Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Let your spirits fly
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Let your spirits fly

Ross Boissoneau - November 10th, 2008
It was Walt Disney who brought the concept of the circle of life to worldwide audiences with the hit animated movie “The Lion King,” and Elton John who wrote and performed the hit song.
But the movie, the Broadway musical based on it and their accompanying soundtracks were hardly the first to showcase the concept of the unending circle of life. Native Americans have long used the hoop dance as an illustration of the same concept. And Traverse City will have the opportunity to see a live illustration of it when Brian Hammill and his group, the Native Spirit Dancers, perform at Dennos Museum’s Milliken Auditorium onTuesday, November 18. The hoops symbolize a sacred part of the Native American life, representing the circle of life with no beginning and no end.. The dancer begins with one hoop and keeps adding and weaving the hoops into formations that represent the journey through life, each additional hoop exemplifying another thread in the web of life.

ONE OF MANY
Though it has become the most requested dance the group performs, the hoop dance is just one of the dances the group will perform at the 7 p.m. show. Hammill and his troupe have an extensive repertoire of dances, including the Eagle Dance, Northern and Southern Traditional Dances, Grass Dance, Fancy Dance, Jingle Dress Dance and Fancy Shawl.
Throughout their history, the indigenous peoples of the Americas have used dance as a means of illuminating and communicating their culture and values, telling stories through the costumes, movements and music. Dances were used for many purposes, such as ceremonial, story telling and entertainment.
The dances represent many things. For example, the Fancy Shawl’s nickname is the butterfly dance, and the performer whirls about the stage, giving the illusion of never touching the ground, epitomizing the grace and beauty of the butterfly.

TOP RATING
The Grass Dance gets its name from the motion of the ribbons and yarn of the dancer’s costume, which brings to mind the movement of the long prairie grasses. It originates from the Omaha Nation of the Northern Plains.
Since founding the Native Spirit Dancers in 1997, Hammill has sought to incorporate dances and styles from various Native American nations from across the United States and Canada. A member of Ho-chunk nation from southern Wisconsin, Hammill is a veteran of the United States Army and currently the number two-ranked hoop dancer in the world. He is also a recording artist, with four recordings currently available.
The event is free to the public. For more information, call the Office of Student Life at NMC at 995-1043.




 
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