Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Let your spirits fly
. . . .

Let your spirits fly

Ross Boissoneau - November 10th, 2008
It was Walt Disney who brought the concept of the circle of life to worldwide audiences with the hit animated movie “The Lion King,” and Elton John who wrote and performed the hit song.
But the movie, the Broadway musical based on it and their accompanying soundtracks were hardly the first to showcase the concept of the unending circle of life. Native Americans have long used the hoop dance as an illustration of the same concept. And Traverse City will have the opportunity to see a live illustration of it when Brian Hammill and his group, the Native Spirit Dancers, perform at Dennos Museum’s Milliken Auditorium onTuesday, November 18. The hoops symbolize a sacred part of the Native American life, representing the circle of life with no beginning and no end.. The dancer begins with one hoop and keeps adding and weaving the hoops into formations that represent the journey through life, each additional hoop exemplifying another thread in the web of life.

ONE OF MANY
Though it has become the most requested dance the group performs, the hoop dance is just one of the dances the group will perform at the 7 p.m. show. Hammill and his troupe have an extensive repertoire of dances, including the Eagle Dance, Northern and Southern Traditional Dances, Grass Dance, Fancy Dance, Jingle Dress Dance and Fancy Shawl.
Throughout their history, the indigenous peoples of the Americas have used dance as a means of illuminating and communicating their culture and values, telling stories through the costumes, movements and music. Dances were used for many purposes, such as ceremonial, story telling and entertainment.
The dances represent many things. For example, the Fancy Shawl’s nickname is the butterfly dance, and the performer whirls about the stage, giving the illusion of never touching the ground, epitomizing the grace and beauty of the butterfly.

TOP RATING
The Grass Dance gets its name from the motion of the ribbons and yarn of the dancer’s costume, which brings to mind the movement of the long prairie grasses. It originates from the Omaha Nation of the Northern Plains.
Since founding the Native Spirit Dancers in 1997, Hammill has sought to incorporate dances and styles from various Native American nations from across the United States and Canada. A member of Ho-chunk nation from southern Wisconsin, Hammill is a veteran of the United States Army and currently the number two-ranked hoop dancer in the world. He is also a recording artist, with four recordings currently available.
The event is free to the public. For more information, call the Office of Student Life at NMC at 995-1043.




 
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