Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · We‘re moving to...
. . . .

We‘re moving to Europe...

Robert Downes - December 1st, 2008
We‘re moving to Europe...
Has anyone noticed that America is starting to look more like Europe lately?
Not that we’re sprouting castles or seeing women going topless at the beach, but there are some trends toward the Europeanization of America that are worth watching. Some good, and some ennh...
Ten years from now, you may wake up and find that you have all of the advantages of a citizen of Paris or Budapest -- and all of the disadvantages too. Consider the following:

Micro cars: You’d swear that most of the cars in Europe aren’t much bigger than shopping carts. And no wonder, because gas hit $12 a gallon in England last summer. Plus, those small cars are more practical in Europe’s congested cities.
Closer to home, Northern Michigan is still the land of giant SUVs and pickup trucks. But the trend is toward smaller cars, especially with the new electric models coming in 2010. Perhaps 10 years from now, European-style Mini Coopers and Smart Cars will be the norm.

Home ownership: America is famous the world over as a land of 75 million homeowners. According to realtor.org, more than two out of three households own their own home -- a rate of more than 67 percent. Home ownership hit 60 percent for minorities in America in 2005 -- an admirable record anywhere in the world.
The 490 million people who live in the European Union, however, are more likely to be renters living in apartments. Even in the prosperous Netherlands, only 48 percent of households own their homes; in Greece, it’s 30 percent.
Unfortunately, the mortgage crisis and job losses are pushing more Americans in that direction, especially for young adults who are already strapped with college loans. Will we become a nation of renters like our European cousins?

Health Care: Sweden has had nationalized health care for most of the 20th century and they’re a healthy bunch, with men living an average of 78 years and women 82. The Swedes tend to exercise, eat healthy, and avoid smoking.
President-elect Barack Obama has promised that we too will have national health care, as is the case for the citizens of most of the 27 countries that make up the European Union.
That’s the good news. The bad news is there’s a high price to pay. The Swedes laid out the equivalent of $25 billion for health care in 2005. How? Their system is funded through local taxation, with county councils having the right to collect an income tax of around 11 percent on top of all the other taxes the Swedes pay -- the highest taxes in the world.
Imagine Emmet or Grand Traverse County sending you an income tax bill of 11 percent to pay for your health care... Then imagine your average American being half as healthy as your average Swede and the extra health care costs for all of our homegrown couch potatoes.

Mass Transit: In Europe, you can go to virtually any village on a train or a bus. If we were to transpose their transit systems to America, then even trips to small towns such as Suttons Bay, Northport, Wolverine and Alanson would be by train, as was the case in the 19th century.
Will those days come again? Possibly. If Obama is able to jump-start the economy, it will be with a $500 billion plan that calls for heavy investment in alternative energy and mass transit among other “green” initiatives.
Northern Michigan would be wise to begin lobbying for some of that public works investment money now. But unlike the clueless Big 3, we need a plan to present... how about a regional train system?

Alternative Power: Denmark produces nearly 20 percent of its electricity from windmills and has cut its carbon emissions by 22 percent since 1988. Increasingly, there are plans to blow Michigan down that same path with the abundance of wind power on the Great Lakes. One plan calls for as many as 100,000 windmills in the state.
In France, however, the alternative is nuclear power. France gets 80 percent of its power from 58 reactors and has made a robust industry out of exporting its nuclear know-how.
Prediction: America will follow suit with both nuclear and wind power schemes as climate change becomes more dire.

Other stuff: You have to “pay to pee” everywhere you go in Europe, with bathroom attendants collecting a coin in every public john. Would anyone be surprised if the same trend took root in America as overburdened municipalities find they can no longer afford public rest-rooms?
Also, like the Europeans, soon, we may find ourselves with more weeks of vacation (albeit unpaid). A citizen of Western Europe gets four-to-six weeks off each year, with the French getting as much as eight weeks of vacation, including the entire month of August.
Unfortunately, our extended vacations are more likely to come in the form of companies and municipalities that are forcing employees to take time off without pay to cope with shrinking budgets...
 
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