Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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Live from Africa?Photographer captures life in the Holler

- June 22nd, 2009
Live from Africa
Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars 6/22/09
Scarred by the wounds of war, but not broken, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars are on a triumphant tour of America in support of a documentary film on the band, whose roots are set in the civil war of the west African country.
The film, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars will have a free showing at the State Theatre in Traverse City on Monday, June 22 at 10 a.m., with the band performing at the City Opera House on Wednesday, June 24 at 6:30 p.m. (Tickets $22 advance, $25 door.)
The band came together while fleeing one of Africa’s most horrifying conflicts, in which victims routinely had limbs amputated or were subject to gang rape, torture, or the massacre of entire villages.
Near the turn of the 21st century, rebel forces attacked Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone, forcing a panicked mass exodus to neighboring countries. Among the thousands who fled were musicians Reuben Koroma and Francis Lamgba (Franco) who connected in a refugee camp in Guinea, West Africa. Along with Reuben’s wife Grace, they began making music for their fellow refugees, providing a welcome distraction to life in the camps.
Safety in the Kalia camp quickly disintegrated, however, when it came under attack from the Guinean army and citizenry. The refugees in this camp were evacuated and relocated to a camp set deep in the Guinean countryside. It was here that, thanks to a Canadian refugee aid organization, the developing band was able to acquire the rusted-out sound system and beat-up electric guitars that helped launch the group.
It was also in this camp that American documentary filmmakers Banker White and Zach Niles, along with Canadian singer-songwriter Chris Velan, encountered the group, which by that point also included Black Nature, a teenaged orphan with a gift for rap, as well as Abdulrahim Kamara (Arahim) and Mohamed Bangura (Medo), both of whom had had limbs amputated by the rebels.
The first-time filmmakers followed the band for three years as they moved from camp to camp. While filming, the United Nations sponsored a trip for the group to return to Freetown so they could see for themselves that the war was indeed over and safe for thousands of refugees to return home.
Ultimately, a recording emerged along with international acclaim, the documentary and a world tour.

Photographer Captures Life in the Holler
Shelby Lee Adams wasn’t always proud of the fact he was born in Hazard, Kentucky, where the Appalachian Mountains isolated the community, or that he spent his teen years in Hot Spot, which was named after a coal company.
He felt trapped there as a child and immersed himself in reading, especially photography and art books.
As he evolved as an artist, Adams devoted his work to telling the story of the mountain folk. Now a world famous photographer, he will talk about his experiences and share his images during a presentation and slide show June 27 at Crooked Tree Arts Center. His appearance culminates Photostock 2009, the fourth-annual gathering of photographers from around the world.
Photostock organizer Bill Schwab said Adams’ intimate portraits of mountain backwoods people resonate everywhere in these tough economic times.
“He shows us generations of families facing a challenging existence with dignity,” Schwab said. “We can all use a few lessons about the merits of being less materialistic.”
As a photographer, Adams began searching for a deeper understanding of his heritage. He ended up documenting the lives of friends from the hollers. They stand on rickety porches held up by cinder blocks, in front of satellite dishes with chickens afoot, and sit at a table in a room with newspaper-covered walls. Sensitive to respecting cultural and humanistic diversity, Adams also captures their strong wills, creativity and motivation.
Tickets are $20 Doors open at 6 p.m. Folk singer Dave Boutette will perform before Adams’ presentation at 7 p.m.
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