Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · All Abourd?
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All Abourd?

Robert Downes - March 23rd, 2009
All Abourd
Robert Downes 3/23/09

Wouldn’t it be nice to travel from Northern Michigan to Detroit or Chicago at 200-300 miles per hour on a magnetic levitation train?
That’s still in the realm of science fiction, but last week’s announcement of plans for a hydrogen-powered MagLev train linking Detroit, Ann Arbor and Lansing does get the wheels of possibility spinning for the future...
Last week, State Representatives Bill Rogers (R-Brighton) and Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City) announced the creation of a bipartisan task force to study the possibility of building a MagLev rail system down the medians of Michigan’s freeway system.
“The elevated rail, designed by Michigan-based Interstate Traveler Company, would not need any federal, state or local funding,” stated Rogers and Schmidt in a news release. “The project could create thousands of jobs for Michigan residents, allow for clean, inexpensive travel, and provide a conduit to distribute electricity, potable water, fiber optics, hydrogen and oxygen.”
Information about the magnetic train line seems a bit half-baked (as evidenced by the above claim that it will somehow be useful as a “conduit for potable water“). It would be built at a reported cost of $2.3 billion, and the hope is that a “HyRail” system could eventually be built across the U.S. State Democrats are also on board the task force, including Reps. Jimmy Womack (D-Detroit) and Mike Huckleberry (D-Greenville).
“We’ve been following the Hydrogen Superhighway for five years now,” said Rep. Huckleberry. “The devil will be in the details, of course. But this concept has enough potential to make it worth pursuing. I’m hoping that we can develop this technology and transportation idea into Michigan jobs.”
If and when the project is built, hydrogen-powered MagLev trains could whisk passengers between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Lansing at 200 mph. Assuming it’s a success, it’s no stretch to imagine that other links would surely extend to Grand Rapids and the cities of Northern Michigan.
The task force is holding four public hearings on the train project: in April, a hearing in Lansing will consider passenger and safety issues. Thereafter, hearings in Ann Arbor, Grand Rapids and Detroit will address energy concerns, environmental impact and financing.
But, as Mike Huckleberry notes, the devil is in the details.
For starters, it’s hard to imagine that a private company could build such a train for $2.3 billion, which seems to be pocket change these days. One can only imagine that Uncle Sam will be tapped on the shoulder at some point during construction of the “Hydrogen Superhighway.”
Fair enough; there are plans for a high-speed rail line from Las Vegas to L.A., and Michigan deserves to be on the same federal gravy train (pun intended).
But what about the train itself? In an artist‘s conception provided by the company, it doesn‘t look any bigger than the Detroit People Mover. Compare this to the vast bullet trains of France or Japan which move hundreds of people at 120-150 mph, with dozens of trains arriving at the station, one right after another. One can only imagine that scores of the MagLev train pictured would be needed to move passengers and recoup the company‘s investment.
There will also be safety concerns. What happens when a trailer truck goes careening into the freeway median on an icy winter night and hits one of the train supports just as the 2 a.m. run is rolling down the tracks? Many of us have seen these jackknife accidents, so the prospect of truck-train collisions is no fantasy.
One can only imagine, however, that people with the know-how to build a MagLev train will be smart enough to find their way around these obstacles. Let‘s hope so, because Michigan‘s future depends on this sort of new technology to get us back on track.

 
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