Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Fresh Treatments on the Age-old Battle of the Sexes

Nancy Sundstrom - April 10th, 2003
The good, the bad, the ugly, and the downright laughable about the business of life as it applies to relationships and family all get a fresh perspective in two new books from writers who obviously know the terrain well.
“Things My Girlfriend and I Have Argued About“ by Mil Millington is the debut novel that is an outgrowth of his Web site of the same name, and “Angry Housewives Eating Bon Bons“ by Lorna Landvik is the latest from the popular author of bestsellers like “Patty Jane’s House of Curl “ and “Welcome to the Great Mysterious.“
After a reading diet as of late that has consisted of serial killers, epic journeys across early America, and techniques for surviving biochemical, nuclear, and terrorist emergencies, both of these felt as welcome as the spring air that we’re opening up our windows to welcome. They’re each funny and affectionate, with many moments from the stuff of daily life that ring true against the backdrop of some textured subplots, and highly recommended.

Things My Girlfriend and I Have Argued About by Mil Millington

Already optioned for the movies, Millington’s story revolves around English-born and bred Pel and his live-in German girlfriend, the unflappable Ursula. Mostly, their life is uneventful, dealing with two young sons and calamities like losing one’s car keys, and, of course, finding new things to argue about.
In the opening paragraphs of the first chapter, he sets up the loving, but combative relationship Pel has with Ursula:

“I’m now late. Ten minutes ago I was early. I was wandering about in a too-early limbo, in fact; scratching out a succession of ludicrously trivial and unsatisfying things to do, struggling against the finger-drumming effort of burning away sections of the too-earliness. The children, quick to sense I was briefly doomed to wander the earth without reason or rest, had attached themselves, one to each of my legs. I clumped around the house like a man in magnetic boots while they laughed themselves breathless and shot at each other with wagging fingers and spit-gargling mouth noises from the cover of opposite knees. Now, however, I’m in a fury of lateness. The responsibility for this rests wholly with the car keys and thereby with their immediate superior - my girlfriend, Ursula.
“Where - where the hell - are the car keys?“ I shout down the stairs. Again. Reason has long since fled. I’ve looked in places where I know there is no possible chance of the car keys lurking. Then I’ve rechecked all those places again. Just in case, you know, I suffered transitory hysterical blindness the first time I looked... I do a semi-controlled fall down the stairs to the kitchen, where Ursula is making herself a cup of coffee in a protective bubble of her own, non-late, serene indifference.
“Well?“ I’m so clenched I have to shake the word from my head.
“Well what?“
“What do you mean “Well what?“ I’ve just asked you twice.“
“I didn’t hear you, Pel. I had the radio on.“ Ursula nods towards the pocket-sized transistor radio on the shelf. Which is off.“

Pel and Ursula’s less-than-idyllic life gets a radical makeover when Pel’s boss mysteriously disappears, and slacker Pel (“for me, half-heartedness is a full-quarter too hearted“) becomes embroiled in a wild chain of events involving stolen money, missing colleagues, and members of the Chinese mafiosi. Whatever warfare Pel and Ursula engage in on a daily basis is hardly training for they mysteries he uncovers through one bumbling escapade after another, all of which comes to a head with a local university building that is going to be built on a historic burial site and has deadly nerve gas in its foundation.
Most of Pel’s narration is extremely sharp and humorous, and while this isn’t a venue for earth-shattering revelations about how men and women jockey for position and power with each other, it is genuinely entertaining at every turn.

Angry Housewives Eating Bon Bons by Lorna Landvik

Landvik had major sleepers with both “Patty Jane’s House of Curl“ and “Welcome to the Great Mysterious,“ and in her latest, she wisely returns to the eccentric landscape of small-town Minnesota life, specifically Freesia Court, where a group of friends have formed a book club they call the AWEB - Angry Wives Eating Bon Bons.
The club becomes a lifestyle, if not a lifeline commitment to each other, and the five women involved each have a story of their own to tell. Newcomer Faith is a lonely housewife and mother with a terrible secret. Audrey is the big, sassy resident sex queen. Merit is a shy doctor’s wife who suffers terrible abuse at his hands. Kari is Mother Earth incarnate - wise, warm, and wordly. Slip is an activist, a spitfire who loves to tackle a challenge, even ones that are greater than her tiny frame might allow.
In the first chapter, “The Members,“ Landvik sets the stage for the three decades of marriages, child raising, neighborhood parties, bad husbands and good friends that will follow by introducing us to Faith and her husband, Wade:

“Fuller Brush salesman had the unfortunate task of trying to sell his wares to the women of Freesia Court during the fifth day of a March cold snap.
“They were like caged animals,“ he complained later to his district manager. “I felt like any minute they were going to turn on me.“
“Brushes?“ Faith Owens had said when he offered up his bright smile and sales pitch on her icy front doorstep. “I‘m sorry, but I‘ve got a little more than brushes to worry about right now. Like wondering if spring is ever going to get here. Because I truly believed it might really be coming when boom -- here it is, twenty below zero with a wind-chill factor that would bring Nanook of the North to his knees.“
“Thank you for your time,“ said the salesman, picking up his case. “You have a pleasant day, now.“
“And what exactly is a wind-chill factor anyway?“
“Faith,“ called her husband, Wade, from the living room. “Faith, don‘t be rude, honey.“
“Well what is it?“ she asked, slamming the door with her hip. “What exactly is a wind-chill factor?“
“This is Minnesota,“ said Wade, ignoring her question because he wasn‘t quite sure of the answer. “What do you expect?“
“Oh, I don‘t know -- maybe a little damn relief?“
“Might I remind you,“ said Wade, “how you cried with delight seeing your first snowfall?“
“I cried with delight the first time I had sex with you, but that doesn‘t mean I want it nonstop.“
“You‘re telling me,“ said Wade with a wistful sigh.“
“Ha, ha, ha,“ said Faith, surveying her neat and trim husband as he brushed his crew cut with his palm, a gesture he always made after what he thought was a joke.“

Landvik’s story spans the ‘40s through the ‘80s, and throughout, the saving grace of friendship is there for her five engaging characters. No matter what hand is dealt them, they play their cards, and in some ways that might surprise the reader. This is the sort of tale that could be far more predictable than it is in its plot conventions, and the material works particularly well because the author isn’t content to make it all safe, neat, and homespun. Landvik’s women learn from the surprises and setbacks they encounter, and the reader can, as well.

 
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