Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 7/06/09
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Letters 7/06/09

- July 6th, 2009
Letters 7/6/09

Tampering with pot vote
There are three State Senate bills being introduced that will take away patients‘ rights to grow their own medical marijuana as originally written in Prop 1 and passed by a majority of voters.
The bills are 616, 617 and 618. While it seems that the bills are working to bring more regulations and public safety to the growing of medical marijuana, instead, it may bring about a statewide monopoly and more federal (DEA) involvement.
First, the DEA does not like large growing operations or buying clubs (the trouble plaguing California‘s medical marijuana) and would target the “medical marijuana growing facilities“ (SB618). Whereas, a “caregiver,” as defined in the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act (MMMA), can only provide medicine for six patients on a much more personal level and is not as big a target.
Bill 616 wishes to amend the MMMA by changing marijuana to a Schedule 2 drug, distributed by a pharmacist, thus taking away the right of patients to grow their own medicine without fear of prosecution. Changing a Federally Scheduled Class 2 drug at the state level may bring in federal agents/agencies and disrupt the needed supply of medicine to patients. Growing a plant does not require additional regulations and oversight as proposed by this bill. Patients cannot poison themselves by growing this medicine. If you grow a plant incorrectly it simply dies.
The original intention and outline of the MMMA, should stand. That is to allow patients access to low-cost medicine, by growing it themselves, if desired.
Having this medicine available at a pharmacy would allow more doctors access to medicinal grade marijuana; however, the federal government may see things differently. Michigan voted to give patients medicine, not a federal government fight.
Call your senator today on this issue, as it will be voted upon soon.

Nirinjan Singh • TC

The new GM
I read with interest Don Montie‘s letter, “Bad auto payback,“ June 2). It appears Don worked at the BOC Assembly plant at Willow Run, which closed in the ‘80s (back when Michigan black tag license plates were a problem in Texas).
I worked at the Hydramatic/Powertrain plant in the same complex at Willow Run until last year. During the ‘70s-‘80s BOC had 4,000-5,000 employees and Powertrain had 14,000 employees. Then GM didn’t make quality products or respond to consumers‘ desires.
Thirty years ago over 50 percent of our plant‘s workforce was under 25 years old, made up of people who graduated from high school in the ‘60s and ‘70s when drug and alcohol use was viewed casually. Back then it was bad, but over the years the people with those problems were let go under the absenteeism programs, drug/ alcohol control programs, quit, or never came back from a layoff.
In the ‘70-‘80s, we made 20-30 transmission products for GM vehicles. One person ran one machine that may have had a cycle time of three-five minutes. You moved your parts to the next machine process by hand, and management didn’t care about quality, just build numbers.
Today, GM is soon to build only a front-wheel and a rear-wheel drive transmission, both with different output housings/torque converters/bell housings for different style and size vehicles. An operator now may run up to 50 long cycle-time machines in a pod, reducing costs; and parts are moved ergonomically on conveyors or chuting with little or no handling.
GM does studies now to minimize the number of times a part is handled from when it comes into the plant to when it leaves, to reduce costs. During the ‘70s, a part that may have had one or two quality checks; today, it is checked for more things and checked at every machining operation.
Today, we build a more complex product with less manpower, better quality, and lower costs that often surpass Honda’s and Toyota’s product numbers.
As to the quality of the employees, I was proud to work with them. To work with 2,000 people and not work with a thief, a drunk, a racist, or a drug abuser is just as likely as to not work with a minister, a VA volunteer, a National Guardsman who served in Iraq, a volunteer EMS fireman, or the many other employees involved in charitable causes and doing good deeds. A bad egg in a company of 10-25 employees is much more noticeable than one in a much larger company, but a bad egg in a big company is liked as much as a bad egg in a small company. I haven’t read “been there,” but the GM of the past is nothing like the GM of the present.

Ray Ravary, Jr. • 32-year GM employee/retiree

Say no to sprinklers
A proposal before the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth to require new residential homes have interior sprinkling systems is ill advised. It is well established that smoke detectors are a more reliable and cost effective way of saving lives.
Hardwired interconnected battery back-up smoke detectors run an average of $50 per detector while independent tamper-proof 10-year battery smoke detectors run between $20 and $25. The average quote in Michigan for installed sprinkler systems for homes on municipal water was $6,566.57 and $11,975.60 for homes on well water.
Families who cannot qualify to purchase the new homes due to the new costs from the mandatory requirement for sprinklers will have to live in housing that is less safe because that housing was built to less stringent code requirements.
Increasing the cost of a new home also drives up the price of existing homes. The greater the increase in the price of existing homes the more Michigan families who are forced to live in less safe homes.

Mike Farrer • TC

Inconvenient
For over a decade I’ve had to mail a paper check twice annually to Garfield Township to pay my property taxes. I was glad to see that the township now offers an online credit card payment option, but only through www.officialpayments.com, which is owned by a company in Reston, Virginia. A “convenience fee” is charged for this service. That is a disappointment, as my own online bill-payment service through a local bank is free.
Using the website’s online calculator, I found the “convenience fee” on a $1,500 tax bill to be $45! This fee is for a one-time payment! Perhaps Garfield Township officials feel the “convenience fee” is a good value in exchange for the convenience (to them) of not having to manually process a large volume of “snailmail” and paper checks.
I decided to continue to mail a paper check to Garfield Township. I’ll use the money I save by not paying the “convenience fee” to help the local economy and buy a good dinner at one of our finer local restaurants.
I’m wondering how many other Garfield Township taxpayers will prefer not to have this “convenient” online service eat their lunch!

Hillar Bergman • TC
 
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