Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Inside the heads of Generation X
. . . .

Inside the heads of Generation X

Kelsey Lauer - August 10th, 2009
Inside the Heads of Generation X

By Kelsey Lauer 8/10/09

backpocket e-pistles
By Mike Darigan
Skellum Imaginations, Inc.
264 pages — $11

“It’s about getting off the track and onto something different, maybe not a road,” writes Josh Meritz, one of four young men in backpocket e-pistles.
And that is exactly what the four close friends — Mike Darigan, Josh Meritz, Cleveland Winfield and Perry Panzarella—proceed to do over the course of a year as they study at four different universities—step off the beaten path and onto one of their own making to escape the pressures of modern society and learn who they truly are.
Through a series of unedited e-mails, backpocket e-pistles tells the story of their adventures and misadventures with learning, love and life in general.
“It’s kind of a collection of useful dreaming and a desire to be an individual and to live life to the fullest, to look at life with a sense of humor and adherence to being creative,” says author Mike Darigan. “Carpe diem would be a two-word summation of the general theme of the book.”
Darigan currently lives in Suttons Bay, where he is working on a book tentatively called La Femme and is starting an organic farm in Northport.

WHO’S WHO
At Emerson College, Mike Darigan is in the final year of a winding, six-year-long college career that began in 1990. Recently returned from studying abroad for a year as an associate student at Oxford University, Darigan discovers the joy of e-mail in 1995 and begins to correspond with three friends, one of whom he met while in England, one of whom he grew up with and another in his first year of university.
Also recently returned from Oxford University, Josh Meritz details his experiences of trying to fit back into a typical American university after his year abroad, which has transformed his expectations of life and given him the ability to question the norm.
Cleveland Winfield, who has known Darigan since the age of six, is a senior political student at the University of Rhode Island and brings a good deal of life experience to the table, thanks to having studied in Wisconsin, served in the army as a tank driver and spent two years in Nevada “slanging dope and getting married.”
Reading for a master’s degree at Whitefriars College, Oxford University, Peregrine “Perry” Panzarella has recently graduated from Providence College, where he and Darigan lived three doors down from each other; Darigan credits Panzarella with his introduction to writing.

COMING OF AGE
In places, backpocket e-pistles fits neatly into the coming-of-age genre personified so well by authors such as Jack Kerouac in On the Road. The concept of coming-of-age spans every generation, for no one really knows who they are until they have lived long enough to make mistakes and fall off—even briefly—the path that they planned to be traveling.
Like some of Kerouac’s works, backpocket e-pistles offers an unedited thought-stream that allows for a deeply personal glimpse inside a character’s life. But it differs from Kerouac’s works in that it details the lives of several students in the first generation to reach adulthood just as technology, such as the Internet, became more prevalent.
E-mail allowed each person writing to attain a spontaneity and realness that can be hard to find in a traditionally-written literary work, even one that is autobiographical; informal writing with at-times entirely lowercase letters means that the language is occasionally hard to follow, but adds to the entirely-true authenticity of each man’s correspondence.
Nearly every page inspires laughter due to one outlandish experience or another or, alternatively, delves deep into a thought-provoking examination of one of life’s many aspects, which Darigan says is exactly what he intended.
“It’s an entertaining book about some funny stories and outlandish acts in terms of the partying,” he says. “It’s a blend of humorous anecdotes mixed with thought-provoking passages. You’re either going to laugh or think about your life a little bit.”

ROADMAP
At a time in life when college students or any other 15 to 25-year-old is struggling to discover who they are and where they are meant to fit in the world, backpocket e-pistles serves as a useful map through some of the rougher patches of life.
It’s no self-help book—and wasn’t meant to be, according to Darigan—but the amusing anecdotes can put a smile onto even the most serious face and teach you a little about life in the process, the main lesson being “...for people to have confidence to adhere to the prompting of their own hearts within the matrix that we all live in that is constantly and subtly exacting pressure to conform,” Darigan says.

Backpocket e-pistles is available locally at Horizon Books and Borders in Traverse City and at Brilliant Books in Suttons Bay and online at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.


 
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