Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Books · A Trek Across the Map of Cool
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A Trek Across the Map of Cool

Nancy Sundstrom - February 27th, 2003
hip••ster - hip-stur (s) n. One who possesses tastes, social attitudes, and opinions deemed cool by the cool. (Note: it is no longer recommended that one use the term “cool“; a Hipster would instead say “deck.“) The Hipster walks among the masses in daily life but is not a part of them and shuns or reduces to kitsch anything held dear by the mainstream. A Hipster ideally possesses no more than 2% body fat.

After reading that definition, are you still mulling over whether or not you might be a hipster? If so, then reflect on the following:
• Do you hold a degree from a liberal arts school whose football team hasn‘t won a game since the Reagan administration?
• Do you frequently use the term “postmodern“ (or its commonly used variation“PoMo“) as an adjective, noun, and verb?
• Do you now or have you ever been known to carry a shoulder-strap messenger bag or wear a pair of horn-rimmed or Elvis Costello-style glasses?
• Do you have refined taste and consider yourself exceptionally cultured, but have one pop vice (ElimiDATE, Quiet Riot, and Entertainment Weekly are popular ones) that helps to define you as well-rounded?
• Do you buy dinnerware at thrift shops to be kitschy, and often throw vegetarian dinner parties?
• Do you have one Republican friend you describe as being your “one Republican friend?“
You get the point, which is why Esquire magazine is calling Robert Lanham’s “The Hipster Handbook“ as “the Official Preppy Handbook for people who wear Atari T-shirts.“ In fact, it doesn’t seem all that long ago that the Preppy Handbook took aim at Izod-wearing, Bloody Mary-sipping elitists, but just in time for the new millennium (which means a bit fashionably late so as to not look over-eager) comes this indispensable “official“ guide to all things hipster, from language and culture to style and etiquette. And what a hoot it is.
More than a bit tongue-in-cheek and with insider knowledge to burn, this book has a decided mission, and Lanham, the author of the romantic series known as “The Emerald Beach Trilogy“ (a collection of novels recently called “a beach towel classic“ by Redbook), was clearly the man for the job, along with his partners-in-crime, Art Director Bret Nicely and “Drawer“ Jeff “J-dawg“ Bechtel.
At the book’s onset, in “Everything That Once Was Cool Is Now Deck,“ Lanham opines on the target audience for his tome, and why hipsters are an essential weave in our society’s fabric:

“You‘ve seen them all over town with their mop-top haircuts, swinging retro pocketbooks, talking on cell phones, smoking European cigarettes, shading their eyes behind bug-eyed lenses, and strutting in platform shoes with a biography of Che sticking out of their bags. They come in all colors, shapes, sizes, and nationalities. Beck is one. Jack Kerouac was one. Meg from the White Stripes is one. And the girl at work in the Jackie-O dress is one too. You may even be one yourself. From New York to New Zealand, Hipsters are everywhere. Welcome to The Hipster Handbook, the first guide to what it means to be a Hipster.
Since Hipsters are a vital part of the international social fabric, this book is for everyone. If you are a Hipster yourself, carry it in your back pocket or in your purse. Excuse yourself to the bathroom during that important party and brush up on the correct lingo by consulting our glossary. Even Hipsters need a refresher course from time to time, and you wouldn‘t want to be throwing out dated slang like “grody“ or “wicked“ when mixing with other Hipsters in the know.
If you are not a Hipster, but want to learn more about this ubiquitous genus, this book is for you too. We will teach you how to spot Hipsters, how to interact with them, and how to better understand their unique culture. If you are a parent with Hipster children, this book will help you understand and maybe even talk to your children. You‘ll also become just a little more deck in the process. If you are a scientist, we hope you‘ll use our anthropological studies as a starting point to document the phenomenon of this emerging human archetype. Our research garnered us a nomination for the Margaret Mead Award in 2001.
And finally, this book is for those among you who want to become Hipsters yourselves. Anyone can become one with the proper education. Study this book and complete the questionnaire at the end and you will be on your way.
But perhaps we are being too kind in saying this book is for everyone. Some people are clearly hopeless. If you are a neo-Nazi and accessorize with an automatic weapon, this book is not for you. If you have appeared in the “Girls Gone Wild“ video series, this book is not for you. If you go to tanning salons, this book is not for you. If you listen to Slipknot and have ever been to the Warped Tour, this book is not for you. And perhaps most important, if you are wearing a sweatshirt that has a Disney character on it, this book is not for you.“

It’s hard not to laugh at most of this, especially the more serious it gets. Just how hip is hip and to what degree does it take to move cool into removed? At what point does it cross over into being a parody of itself? How much can one copy and ingratiate into their own life without completely betraying the essence of the hipster mentality and lifestyle? If you have to work at being a hipster, does the end result even count?
These are just a few of the probing questions Lanham puts under the microscope, and to assist in uncovering the answers, he helpfully provides items like lists of indispensable hipster music and literature, and a questionnaire that susses out whether you’re truly hipster material or not. I won’t reveal what my results showed, because that would fly in the face of even pretending to be somewhat hip, but I’m glad Lanham’s done the heavy lifting for the vast world of hipster wannabees out there. Perhaps that category will be next up on his hit list, and I, for one, wouldn’t hesitate to settle in with that book, either.

 
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