Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Master of cycling
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Master of cycling

Erin Cowell - August 24th, 2009
Masters of Cycling
By Erin Crowell 8/24/09

For the Hagerty Men’s Cycling Masters Team, age is just another number. So is first, second and third. Winning has become a theme this year for both the team as a whole and the individual men who compete in a category of cyclists age 45 and older.
This season, Hagerty has cranked out state-wide wins at the West Branch Classic, Tour of Frankenmuth, Tour of Kensington Valley, the Michigan State Time Trial Championship and the Cone Azalia Spring Classic, along with several single-digit finishes at the Willow Time Trial, Tour de Mount Pleasant, Superior Bike Fest and the Maillot Jaune Road Race.
They will look for another win when they compete on home pavement this weekend at the second annual Cherry Roubaix. The race features a criterium in the Old Town district of Traverse City on Saturday; then a road race through Leelanau Peninsula on Sunday.
Hagerty member Clifford Onthank is confident for Sunday’s race. “I hope to win (the 55 and older category),” he says.
However, Onthank shares the same sentiments as the rest of the Masters Team, saying regardless of the winner, it will be a Hagerty bike crossing the finish line first.
“We do a lot more hill climbing than the flatlanders -- That’s what we call the people from downstate. (The Cherry Roubaix) is a very difficult climbing course as far as hills go,” Onthank says.

MASTERS OF THEIR CRAFT
Leaving their tread marks on the competition is just a part time job for these elite cyclists. All the Hagerty Masters have full-time occupations, including Dr. Onthank, chiropractor; Don Fedrigon, Jr., real estate broker; Dan Hofstra, CPA; and Dr. Norm Licht, M.D., orthopedic surgeon.
Some people might believe holding a steady career while pulling out wins as a competitive athlete would seem impossible. But for these seasoned cyclists, it’s easy.
“Since swimming in college, I’ve learned to time manage,” says Licht. “You just schedule time to do it. Maybe that means an hour ride at lunch or doing it after the kids go to sleep.”
However, training for a bike race pales in comparison to the event Licht was training for seven years ago.
In 2002, he qualified for the ultimate in endurance sport races: The Ironman Triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, comprised of a 2.4-swim in the ocean, a 112-mile bike ride and a marathon (26.2-mile run).
Licht was 45-years-old when he qualified, finishing in the required top 10 percent of his field. However, with his first child due on the day of the race, Licht happily settled for qualifying (having completed the same distance in Lake Placid, New York) and opted out of the race.

GLORY DAYS
Eventually, Licht retired from triathlon racing, but he doesn’t attribute children for the reason he stopped.
“I’m old and decrepit. There’s not much else I can do,” he says.
Aches, pains and a hip problem forced Licht to throw in his running shoes and stay in the clips. He swapped triathlons for cycling.
Former pro cyclist Hal Bezier says he, too, is feeling the effects of age. “I snap and crack nowadays,” he laughs. Bezier, closing in on 48, started racing in the pro circuit when he was 22. Competing in races all over the country, the Oklahoma native spent a couple years at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado.
“I raced with some big names – Phinney, Kiefel, Ekimov, the McCormack brothers – a lot of guys you wouldn’t know nowadays,” he says.
Reaching his 30s, Bezier says he began losing speed. By the time he moved to Traverse City, he retired from pro cycling.
Now, Bezier has taken the road his teammate got off years ago, by training for Ironman races, including the upcoming Panama City Ironman in November.
Aside from switching up sports, getting older has its advantages. Like a fine wine, cyclists get better with age, or at least, smarter. “I’ve learned to ride with the competition,” says Onthank. “I’m also using a more systematic training method, growing with experience.”
Learning to train better means training smarter, not pushing it too hard, getting the easy training to pay off, adds Masters teammate Lars Welton.
“You lose your fast-twitch (muscle) ability so you’re never as good a sprinter as you were before,” says Onthank, “Now, I feel like a have more endurance. The longer the race goes, the better I feel.”

NO PACK FODDERS HERE
Although the Masters category in cycling is for ages 35 and older, make no mistake -- these aren’t just a bunch of “old farts,” as some team members put it. In the world of cycling, there are five categories, or levels, of racing: level five being the most recreational cyclist, all the way down to level one, or those of professional caliber. A person has to be at a level two in order to compete on the Masters level.
“As a Masters, you could race in the pro group but you probably won’t win,” says Licht. “But if you race your age group you can compete.
“We go 30 mph around corners. It’s about competing, rather than just showing up. It’s not about riding in the pelaton and just being a pack fodder,” he says.
Say what??
Pelaton is the cycling term for a group of riders and pack fodder is someone who “just sits in the group and never wins the race,” Licht explains.
In others words, the Hagerty Masters Team gets the job done.
“We actually really do race and we have changed the way Masters Racers race in the state of Michigan,” he says. “Before, you would just sit in the pack and ride around in circles and have a sprint at the end.”
They may be getting older, but it seems the Hagerty Masters will continue taking it to the asphalt and feeling the burn.
“We show up at a race and attack,” Licht says. “It’s actually very painful to be in a Masters Race now.”

The Hagerty Cycling Masters Team will set the pace when they compete at the Second Annual Cherry Roubaix, Aug. 29 & Aug. 30. The criterium, or timed race course, will happen in the Old Town district of Traverse City on Saturday; followed by the road race, a multiple-lap course of up to 72 miles, along the roads of Leelanau Peninsula on Sunday. For more information, go to www.cherryroubaix.com. For more information on the Hagerty Masters Team, visit www.racehagerty.com.

 
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