Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Hot off the Presses, and Hot,...
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Hot off the Presses, and Hot, Period

Nancy Sundstrom - February 20th, 2003
The film “Chicago“ is burning up movie screens all over the country, and in the publishing industry, a Windy City tome entitled “The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America“ is not just hot-off-the-presses, but hot period.
The book is the latest from Erik Larson, a gifted historical storyteller and author of best-sellers like “Isaac’s Storm,“ the title says it all, and the story is absolutely riveting, especially since it’s true. Think of it as the non-fiction brother of “The Alchemist“ by Caleb Carr, and you’re in the ballpark. Like Carr, Larsen takes real events and relates them in a dramatic and spellbinding way, only this is not a novel. Juicy, lurid, endlessly fascinating, and skillfully executed, the history here leaps off the pages and makes for a remarkable overall effort.
Larson weaves together the tale of two men against the backdrop of the 1893 Chicago World‘s Fair. They couldn’t have been more alike and more dissimilar as they went about their respective missions, which were closely linked to what was about to be the Windy City’s finest moment.
The first, and far more noble of the two is Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important and influential structures at the time, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. Burnham had his work cut out for him in transforming Chicago’s swampy Jackson Park into the ambitiously modern “White City,“as he was charged with delivering the sprawling project on an extremely tight two-year schedule while coping with a long list of major obstacles.
The other subject of the tale is the reincarnation of the devil himself. H.H. Holmes (born Herman Webster Mudgett), a serial killer masquerading as a charming doctor who was responsible for the horrifying and grisly murders of somewhere between 27 and 200 people, mostly young women. Jack the Ripper might have caught the attention of the world just a few years earlier, but he had nothing on Holmes. In a simultaneous and perverse twist on what Burnham was doing, Holmes built his own “World’s Fair Hotel“ just west of the fairgrounds - a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium where most of his victims met their fate.
Larson establishes the mood of the day and the gritty feel of a place where such an unthinkable thing could occur. In “The Black City“ chapter in the book’s early pages, he hooks the reader in, and defies them to slide away from him by its end:

“How easy it was to disappear:
A thousand trains a day entered or left Chicago. Many of these trains brought single young women who had never even seen a city but now hoped to make one of the biggest and toughest their home. Jane Addams, the urban reformer who founded Chicago‘s Hull House, wrote, “Never before in civilization have such numbers of young girls been suddenly released from the protection of the home and permitted to walk unattended upon the city streets and to work under alien roofs.“ The women sought work as typewriters, stenographers, seamstresses, and weavers. The men who hired them were for the most part moral citizens intent on efficiency and profit. But not always...
Anonymous death came early and often. Each of the thousand trains that entered and left the city did so at grade level. You could step from a curb and be killed by the Chicago Limited. Every day on average two people were destroyed at the city‘s rail crossings. Their injuries were grotesque. Pedestrians retrieved severed heads. There were other hazards. Streetcars fell from drawbridges. Horses bolted and dragged carriages into crowds. Fires took a dozen lives a day. In describing the fire dead, the term the newspapers most liked to use was “roasted.“ There was diphtheria, typhus, cholera, influenza. And there was murder. In the time of the fair the rate at which men and women killed each other rose sharply throughout the nation but especially in Chicago, where police found themselves without the manpower or expertise to manage the volume. In the first six months of 1892 the city experienced nearly eight hundred homicides. Four a day. Most were prosaic, arising from robbery, argument, or sexual jealousy. Men shot women, women shot men, and children shot each other by accident. But all this could be understood. Nothing like the Whitechapel killings had occurred. Jack the Ripper‘s five-murder spree in 1888 had defied explanation and captivated readers throughout America, who believed such a thing could not happen in their own hometowns.
But things were changing. Everywhere one looked the boundary between the moral and the wicked seemed to be degrading. Elizabeth Cady Stanton argued in favor of divorce. Clarence Darrow advocated free love. A young woman named Borden killed her parents.
And in Chicago a young handsome doctor stepped from a train, his surgical valise in hand. He entered a world of clamor, smoke, and steam, refulgent with the scents of murdered cattle and pigs. He found it to his liking.
The letters came later, from the Cigrands, Williamses, Smythes, and untold others, addressed to that strange gloomy castle at Sixty-third and Wallace, pleading for the whereabouts of daughters and daughters‘ children.
It was so easy to disappear, so easy to deny knowledge, so very easy in the smoke and din to mask that something dark had taken root.
This was Chicago, on the eve of the greatest fair in history.“

As Larson examines Burnham’s painstaking efforts to build a world’s fair and Holmes’ pain-inflicting efforts to lure scores of young women to death, mostly in alternating chapters, he reveals a pentimento of wonder and evil, and majesty and mayhem, punctuated by the appearances of legendary figures of the time, such as Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, Theodore Dreiser, and Buffalo Bill Cody. “The Devil in the White City“ is an amazing piece of historical writing as well as a fascinating psychological profile of two men who each left a profound impact on a city, an era, and, finally, the world. Don’t miss this one.



 
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