Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Studs Terkel
. . . .

Studs Terkel

Rick Coates - November 10th, 2008
Louis “Studs” Terkel passed away on Halloween, a fitting day for one of the great characters of the 20th century. Studs was a celebrated author, journalist, actor, activist and radio show host. For many a journalist, myself included, Studs was an inspiration.
He died at the age of 96, still enjoying his daily cigar and at least one martini. Up to his last days he continued what he enjoyed doing most in life: “Working.” He once wrote: “I took a vacation once - it involved a beach - and to tell you the truth, I had no idea what to do with myself. It was torture. Work is life. Without it, there is no life.”
Studs built a name for himself by seeking out the ordinary people of our world and showing them as extraordinary, and certainly seeking out the famous and making them appear ordinary.
“I have, after a fashion, been celebrated for having celebrated the lives of the uncelebrated among us; for lending voice to the face in the crowd,” he wrote in the opening line of his memoir “Touch and Go.”
He had a journalistic style like no other and scoffed at the notion of the most sacred word in journalism: “objectivity.”
“There ain’t no such animal as objectivity,” he once told National Public Radio. “We all have opinions. If there is not an objective, what is the point? Being objective means taking the status quo, when you question the status quo you are controversial. Anyone who questions authority is often called non-objective, so I object to that word.”

BLACKLISTED
Controversy followed Studs early in his career as he found himself “blacklisted” during the McCarthy era of the ’50s. His popular TV show, “Studs Place,” was dropped by the network after his phone was wiretapped and he was heard using the word “commie.” Later in life, Studs would express frustration as he joked about his wife’s FBI file being thicker than his.
Despite that “blacklisting” from television, Terkel found a home at Chicago radio station WFMT in 1952. Following that year, Studs would broadcast his popular morning show for 45 years, doing what he did best: carrying on conversations and bringing out things in people that other journalists were not able to do. He also wrote several books and articles.
Studs would win the Pulitzer Prize for his oral history of “The Good War,” about WWII. But while many have called that “America’s Greatest Generation,” he would tell the Chicago Tribune there was even a greater one.
“It was in the ‘60’s; there was the civil rights movement, it flourished, at least for a time, and the rise, resurgence, of feminism; the gays and lesbians coming out as free people. So that’s the generation, I think the greatest.”
He ended his radio career in 1998 with his traditional sign-off “Take it easy, but take it.” After radio, he continued writing books, and assisting the Chicago History Museum in cataloging 9,000 hours of tapes of his 45 years in radio. He also began to explore the concept of death, something that was driven home to him the year after he retired when his wife of 60 years passed away.
“We need to spend more time thinking about death,” said Terkel to the BBC. “It is something we don’t talk too much about.”

MY EPITATH
Studs flirted with death a couple times late in life. In 2004, he fell, requiring dangerous neck surgery for a person of any age. In August 2005, he underwent a risky open-heart procedure to replace a narrowed aortic valve and redo one of the five coronary bypasses he’d undergone nine years before. “To my knowledge, Studs is the oldest patient to undergo this complex redo,” said Dr. Marshall Goldin, the cardiovascular surgeon at Rush University Medical Center who operated on Terkel.
A few years back when he was asked what keeps him going and what his gravestone should read he responded:
“My curiosity keeps me going. My epitaph has already been formed: Curiosity did not kill this cat.”
Thanks Studs, for 96 years of “curiosity.” may you be an inspiration to future journalists. Rest in peace and hopefully the guy upstairs is “objective.”
To learn more about Studs Terkel and to listen to the archives of his radio shows and his great interviews with operatic singers, folk singers, popular singers, stage and movie actresses and actors, blues and jazz musicians, television personalities, writers, poets, playwrights, filmmakers, historians, political commentators, activists in community organizing, labor relations and civil rights; and countless everyday people... check out studsterkel.org.


 
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