Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The auto industry‘s last...
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The auto industry‘s last stand

George Foster - November 24th, 2008
Let me get this straight.
President Bush and some legislators don’t want to loan the failing U.S. auto industry $25 billion to help it back on its feet? Not so long ago, the president was one of the first to plead with Americans taxpayers to fork over $700 billion to the banking industry with little accountability required by these Wall Street executives.
The administration is also quick to question the patriotism of any American who balks at his plans for funding the Iraq occupation. Conservative estimates ring up that conflict at $12 billion PER MONTH, $16 billion if you add in the Afghanistan War. Even though Americans were assured at the outset of the Baghdad invasion that Iraqi oil revenues would fund the war, U.S. taxpayers will pay (gulp) many trillions of dollars before our recent Middle East adventures are completed.
We are all suffering from bailout fatigue and I dispute the notion that we have an obligation to save failing companies and industries (we don’t). You have to admit, though, the auto industry may be the exception. No one is sure if the loan will solve the automakers’ problems, but it is worth a shot.
The $25 billion is a drop in the bucket compared to the way we’ve been burning money on bailouts. The proposed auto industry funding would be less than 4% of the money already set aside for Wall Street.
It must be disclosed that I am forever indebted to General Motors, where my father was employed for 44 years in Flint. Dad was always a blue-collar guy, but we never had to worry about how we would pay for our next meal or having a roof over our heads. Thanks to the UAW, G.M.’s fringe benefits plan has provided my parents with a comfortable retirement. G.M. also supplied me with several summer jobs, helping to fund my college education.
Yet, there is no room for sentimentality or partisanship in this crisis. Though General Motors has lost market share, it still sells more autos in this country than any other manufacturer. Respected industry reviews indicate that G.M., Ford, and Chrysler (the so-called Big Three) are manufacturing many quality cars. For those who complain that the U.S. car companies have focused too much on SUV’s and trucks - dude, gas-guzzlers are exactly what you and I and many American consumers wanted to buy until recently.
If the U.S. auto industry doesn’t survive, job losses would climb into the millions as a result of the ripple effect of the Big Three collapsing. If that happens, well... the resulting anarchy would likely be beyond comprehension.
Instead, we should look at this moment as an opportunity. The reeling auto industry, energy crisis, struggling U.S. economy, and national security concerns are all converging as top priorities, needing immediate attention.
Instead of thwarting U.S. automakers, our government should take the initiative to work with the Big Three to accelerate our conversion to mass transit, electric cars, and alternative forms of energy. Loans to the U.S. auto companies should be accompanied by government contracts to help transition our nation’s transportation system toward greener fuel sources.
In return, unlike the result of the Wall Street bailout, there should be sacrifices required for everyone. First, unreasonable auto executive bonuses and benefits would be eliminated. Vastly increased gas-mileage requirements would also be imposed on auto companies.
Blue-collar workers and the UAW would need to sacrifice some benefits in order to keep car prices competitive with Japanese models. Most importantly, a significant gasoline tax, similar to what many other countries use, would be imposed on consumers to encourage more energy conservation and provide funding for the new infrastructure conversion.
The result of government’s cooperation with the U.S. auto industry has phenomenal possibilities. Becoming less energy dependent on rogue nations such as Venezuela, Iran and Saudi Arabia for crude oil would improve American national security. Many thousands of new manufacturing jobs can be created and U.S. car companies will be saved in the process. Most importantly, Americans would be at the forefront of a monumental change in the world’s auto industry.
Though it is a calculated risk, we should support such a loan to automakers with strings attached. The upside is immeasurable.

 
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