Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Images of the Watershed
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Images of the Watershed

Kristi Kates - September 28th, 2009
Images of the Watershed
Photographers challenged in 2010 Juried Exhibition

By Kristi Kates 9/28/09

Northern Michigan waters truly define the character of our region and our residents’ way of life – and that, despite their beauty, these waters are actually quite fragile, points out Gail DeMeyere, Crooked Tree Arts Center Visual Arts Director.
“The future of our waters depends on what we do today to protect and restore them,” DeMeyere says.
“Watershed awareness” is the theme for the Crooked Tree Art Center’s 29th Annual Photography Exhibition, showing January through April 2010 in Petoskey.
As DeMeyere explains it, a watershed is
“the area of the land’s surface that drains to a particular water body.” The Tip of the Mitt
website goes on to explain that watershed boundaries are generally based on high elevations; for instance, the continental divide is North America’s most famous watershed boundary. On the east side of the continental divide, the rivers and other water bodies, including the Great Lakes, all drain to the Atlantic Ocean. On the west side of the continental divide, all of
the waters drain to the Pacific.

MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHERS
The 2010 Juried Exhibition is open to all Michigan photographers age 18 and older and/or members of Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center. The CTAC is working with Petoskey’s Tip of the Mitt Council, the Watershed Center of Grand Traverse Bay, and the Leelanau Conservancy to create an exhibition of images shot solely on watershed lands. Exhibition work will be accepted in early Janurary, but if you’re interested, it’s best to get started now or start sorting through files of past works, as DeMeyere is hoping to acquire images from all four seasons, whether they’re images already shot, or images created this fall/winter.
“Also, just because the photographs need to be created on watershed land does not mean that all images have to have water in them,” DeMeyere explains. “This is merely a reference point from which to spring forward.
“I hope that the photographers will create images that challenge themselves,” she continues. “The seasons here are what make living in this area so exceptional; the fact that the consistency is change, and that water and the beauty of the environment is so much a part of our lives.”

CHALLENGING IMAGES
There are plenty of resources for the photographers to take on that challenge; the Grand Traverse Bay watershed alone encompasses 973 square miles, while, a little closer to CTAC’s Petoskey hometown, Lake Charlevoix, Mullett Lake, Walloon Lake, and the Little Traverse Bay region all hold watershed status.
Little Traverse Bay itself (Petoskey/Harbor Springs) is actually Lake Michigan’s fourth largest bay, with a diverse shoreline that includes sand ecosystems, cobble (rock) beach, and exposed limestone bedrock. The bay is 3.5 miles wide between Petoskey and Harbor Springs, and eight miles wide at its far end.
That’s a lot of opportunity for great photos. But DeMeyere isn’t putting any limits on the photographers with the exception of having them shoot on watershed land (or water.)
“The content of the images are up to the imaginations of the photographers,” she says, “I never go into a juried exhibition with a preconceived concept as to what work will be in the show, this is what makes juried exhibitions so exciting. There are always surprises!”
The best among this particular session of photography work will be rewarded with, of course, public display of the photographers’ works at CTAC, plus cash awards for first, second, and third places, as well as non-cash honorable mention awards. But the real reward, as DeMeyere says, is in helping these delicate waterscapes and the lands surrounding them.
“By bringing attention to the cause of these watershed councils and focusing on the beauty, as well as the fragility of the area in which we live, this exhibition hopes to honor and preserve our resources.”

To obtain more information on the three watershed councils and view maps that highlight the regions in the exhibition, you can go online to: the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council www.watershedcouncil.org the Leelanau Conservancy www.theconservancy.com or the Watershed Center www.gtbay.org. More information about the photography exhibition is on CTAC’s website at www.crookedtree.org, or you may telephone them at 231-347-5552 for art drop-off times and other details.

 
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