Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Images of the Watershed
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Images of the Watershed

Kristi Kates - September 28th, 2009
Images of the Watershed
Photographers challenged in 2010 Juried Exhibition

By Kristi Kates 9/28/09

Northern Michigan waters truly define the character of our region and our residents’ way of life – and that, despite their beauty, these waters are actually quite fragile, points out Gail DeMeyere, Crooked Tree Arts Center Visual Arts Director.
“The future of our waters depends on what we do today to protect and restore them,” DeMeyere says.
“Watershed awareness” is the theme for the Crooked Tree Art Center’s 29th Annual Photography Exhibition, showing January through April 2010 in Petoskey.
As DeMeyere explains it, a watershed is
“the area of the land’s surface that drains to a particular water body.” The Tip of the Mitt
website goes on to explain that watershed boundaries are generally based on high elevations; for instance, the continental divide is North America’s most famous watershed boundary. On the east side of the continental divide, the rivers and other water bodies, including the Great Lakes, all drain to the Atlantic Ocean. On the west side of the continental divide, all of
the waters drain to the Pacific.

MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHERS
The 2010 Juried Exhibition is open to all Michigan photographers age 18 and older and/or members of Petoskey’s Crooked Tree Arts Center. The CTAC is working with Petoskey’s Tip of the Mitt Council, the Watershed Center of Grand Traverse Bay, and the Leelanau Conservancy to create an exhibition of images shot solely on watershed lands. Exhibition work will be accepted in early Janurary, but if you’re interested, it’s best to get started now or start sorting through files of past works, as DeMeyere is hoping to acquire images from all four seasons, whether they’re images already shot, or images created this fall/winter.
“Also, just because the photographs need to be created on watershed land does not mean that all images have to have water in them,” DeMeyere explains. “This is merely a reference point from which to spring forward.
“I hope that the photographers will create images that challenge themselves,” she continues. “The seasons here are what make living in this area so exceptional; the fact that the consistency is change, and that water and the beauty of the environment is so much a part of our lives.”

CHALLENGING IMAGES
There are plenty of resources for the photographers to take on that challenge; the Grand Traverse Bay watershed alone encompasses 973 square miles, while, a little closer to CTAC’s Petoskey hometown, Lake Charlevoix, Mullett Lake, Walloon Lake, and the Little Traverse Bay region all hold watershed status.
Little Traverse Bay itself (Petoskey/Harbor Springs) is actually Lake Michigan’s fourth largest bay, with a diverse shoreline that includes sand ecosystems, cobble (rock) beach, and exposed limestone bedrock. The bay is 3.5 miles wide between Petoskey and Harbor Springs, and eight miles wide at its far end.
That’s a lot of opportunity for great photos. But DeMeyere isn’t putting any limits on the photographers with the exception of having them shoot on watershed land (or water.)
“The content of the images are up to the imaginations of the photographers,” she says, “I never go into a juried exhibition with a preconceived concept as to what work will be in the show, this is what makes juried exhibitions so exciting. There are always surprises!”
The best among this particular session of photography work will be rewarded with, of course, public display of the photographers’ works at CTAC, plus cash awards for first, second, and third places, as well as non-cash honorable mention awards. But the real reward, as DeMeyere says, is in helping these delicate waterscapes and the lands surrounding them.
“By bringing attention to the cause of these watershed councils and focusing on the beauty, as well as the fragility of the area in which we live, this exhibition hopes to honor and preserve our resources.”

To obtain more information on the three watershed councils and view maps that highlight the regions in the exhibition, you can go online to: the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council www.watershedcouncil.org the Leelanau Conservancy www.theconservancy.com or the Watershed Center www.gtbay.org. More information about the photography exhibition is on CTAC’s website at www.crookedtree.org, or you may telephone them at 231-347-5552 for art drop-off times and other details.

 
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