Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Vincent Pernicano
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Vincent Pernicano

Kristi Kates - October 26th, 2009
Boyne Falls Artist Goes International Vincent Pernicano
By Kristi Kates 10/26/09

“I can’t really say what people like best about my work,” Boyne Falls artist Vincent Pernicano says, “I’m just happy that some find it interesting and tell me that they enjoy it.”
“Some” finding it interesting is an understatement, given the rapidly-growing popularity and acclaim of this skillful artisan’s creations.
Originally from Detroit - primarily the Ferndale area - Pernicano began traveling Up North in his early 20s for skiing trips, and eventually bought a house with two good friends who left the state and sold their shares to Pernicano, who has lived in that same house with his family for the past 27 years.
“My studio is in our home, and I do welcome visitors, but I don’t have a formal display area, as space is limited. If I happen to be working when visitors stop by, they are welcome to observe - but, depending on what I am working on, it may be about as interesting as watching paint dry,” Pernicano chuckles.
Pernicano says that he practices three variations of technique that use glass as the unifying material.
“The first and oldest technique that I developed combines glass with copper, brass and silver overlay to make a variety of jewelry pieces as well as ornaments and sculpture,” he explains. “For the second technique, I fuse layers of colored glass together in a kiln to make what I call glass stones or jewels; I then use these stones to make pins, pendants and earrings or to embellish various other works. For my third technique, I use glass in combination with painting to create three-dimensional pictures or scenes. I also enjoy glass blowing but only get to practice it occasionally.”
As seen in the many bright colors and striking shapes of his works, Pernicano is primarily inspired by nature.
“I am inspired in all of my work by everyday life, the natural beauty of our planet, and the mysteries of the universe,” he says, “I try to create positive images of a better world, and believe that one of reasons we are here is to help evolve life to a higher plane.”
Pernicano sells most of his work at art fairs, which he has found the best way to showcase his art.
“Art fairs allow people to view a body of work, and also allow me to meet and communicate with those who find it interesting,” he says.

BOYNE TO JAPAN
One of those who found his work very interesting indeed is a woman named Midori Ueda-Okahana - who just happens to be the director of the Yokohama International Open-Art Fair in Japan. Meeting Ueda-Okahana would prove to be a wonderful happenstance for Pernicano, who will now be one of only 10 artists from outside of Japan who has received an invitation to show his work at this prestigious event October 30 through November 1.
“Last year at the Ann Arbor Art Fair, a woman came into my booth and spent some time looking at my work. She asked me if I would be interested in going to Japan to do an art fair - I told her that I would love to do an art fair in Japan, but I thought that the cost would be prohibitive. She told me that her group was working on ways to financially help the invited artists and that she would be in touch via e-mail. She said that they were inviting a total of ten artists from the U.S. and Canada. A few months later she wrote to say that they were going to pay our transportation to and from Japan, pay the shipping for our work, build display booths for us, and provide translators and take care of customs for us. Delphi Stained Glass, who I buy most of my glass supplies from, has agreed help me with some of my other travel expenses.”
The purpose of Ueda-Okahana’s organization, she explained, was to promote art and art fairs in Japan. Apparantly, art is only available at this time through galleries in Japan; the art fairs that most Northern Michigan residents and visitors are so used to seeing every summer, where anyone can view and purchase art, simply do not exist, something that Ueda-Okahana is trying to change.
Pernicano’s trip to Japan in a couple of weeks - which will be his first art show overseas - will expose his art to a whole new audience; but for him, it’s just as much about the process as it is the finished product.
“I enjoy all aspects of my work, from the original concept to the finished piece,” he says, “it’s not a job, it’s a journey, and at the end of the journey I sometimes have a piece that someone else will enjoy looking at. My greatest reward is the smile I see on the face of someone who has stopped to look at my work.”
Vincent Pernicano’s artwork may be viewed online at www.blueskyglass.com, which shows a variety of his jewelry and 3-D work, as well as his art show itinerary for the year in Michigan, Ohio, and Florida. Pernicano’s fused-glass pendants and earrings are also carried locally by the Art and Soul Gallery in Traverse City.

 
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