Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Art · Vincent Pernicano
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Vincent Pernicano

Kristi Kates - October 26th, 2009
Boyne Falls Artist Goes International Vincent Pernicano
By Kristi Kates 10/26/09

“I can’t really say what people like best about my work,” Boyne Falls artist Vincent Pernicano says, “I’m just happy that some find it interesting and tell me that they enjoy it.”
“Some” finding it interesting is an understatement, given the rapidly-growing popularity and acclaim of this skillful artisan’s creations.
Originally from Detroit - primarily the Ferndale area - Pernicano began traveling Up North in his early 20s for skiing trips, and eventually bought a house with two good friends who left the state and sold their shares to Pernicano, who has lived in that same house with his family for the past 27 years.
“My studio is in our home, and I do welcome visitors, but I don’t have a formal display area, as space is limited. If I happen to be working when visitors stop by, they are welcome to observe - but, depending on what I am working on, it may be about as interesting as watching paint dry,” Pernicano chuckles.
Pernicano says that he practices three variations of technique that use glass as the unifying material.
“The first and oldest technique that I developed combines glass with copper, brass and silver overlay to make a variety of jewelry pieces as well as ornaments and sculpture,” he explains. “For the second technique, I fuse layers of colored glass together in a kiln to make what I call glass stones or jewels; I then use these stones to make pins, pendants and earrings or to embellish various other works. For my third technique, I use glass in combination with painting to create three-dimensional pictures or scenes. I also enjoy glass blowing but only get to practice it occasionally.”
As seen in the many bright colors and striking shapes of his works, Pernicano is primarily inspired by nature.
“I am inspired in all of my work by everyday life, the natural beauty of our planet, and the mysteries of the universe,” he says, “I try to create positive images of a better world, and believe that one of reasons we are here is to help evolve life to a higher plane.”
Pernicano sells most of his work at art fairs, which he has found the best way to showcase his art.
“Art fairs allow people to view a body of work, and also allow me to meet and communicate with those who find it interesting,” he says.

One of those who found his work very interesting indeed is a woman named Midori Ueda-Okahana - who just happens to be the director of the Yokohama International Open-Art Fair in Japan. Meeting Ueda-Okahana would prove to be a wonderful happenstance for Pernicano, who will now be one of only 10 artists from outside of Japan who has received an invitation to show his work at this prestigious event October 30 through November 1.
“Last year at the Ann Arbor Art Fair, a woman came into my booth and spent some time looking at my work. She asked me if I would be interested in going to Japan to do an art fair - I told her that I would love to do an art fair in Japan, but I thought that the cost would be prohibitive. She told me that her group was working on ways to financially help the invited artists and that she would be in touch via e-mail. She said that they were inviting a total of ten artists from the U.S. and Canada. A few months later she wrote to say that they were going to pay our transportation to and from Japan, pay the shipping for our work, build display booths for us, and provide translators and take care of customs for us. Delphi Stained Glass, who I buy most of my glass supplies from, has agreed help me with some of my other travel expenses.”
The purpose of Ueda-Okahana’s organization, she explained, was to promote art and art fairs in Japan. Apparantly, art is only available at this time through galleries in Japan; the art fairs that most Northern Michigan residents and visitors are so used to seeing every summer, where anyone can view and purchase art, simply do not exist, something that Ueda-Okahana is trying to change.
Pernicano’s trip to Japan in a couple of weeks - which will be his first art show overseas - will expose his art to a whole new audience; but for him, it’s just as much about the process as it is the finished product.
“I enjoy all aspects of my work, from the original concept to the finished piece,” he says, “it’s not a job, it’s a journey, and at the end of the journey I sometimes have a piece that someone else will enjoy looking at. My greatest reward is the smile I see on the face of someone who has stopped to look at my work.”
Vincent Pernicano’s artwork may be viewed online at www.blueskyglass.com, which shows a variety of his jewelry and 3-D work, as well as his art show itinerary for the year in Michigan, Ohio, and Florida. Pernicano’s fused-glass pendants and earrings are also carried locally by the Art and Soul Gallery in Traverse City.

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