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Letters 10-03-2016

Truths And Minorities While I appreciate Stephen Tuttle’s mention of the Colin Kaepernick situation, I was disappointed he wrote only of his right not to stand for the national anthem but not his reason for doing so. Personally, I commend Mr. Kaepernick for his courageous attempt to bring issues of concern to the forefront. As a white male baby boomer, I sadly realize I am in a minority among my peers...

“Yes” Means Your Rights It has been brought to my attention that some people in Traverse City are being asked to put “no” on Proposal 3 signs in their yards, and are falsely being told this means they do not want tall buildings downtown. Nothing could be further from the truth. If you vote no, you will be giving up your right to vote on future projects involving buildings over 60 feet in height...

Shame On NMC, Nelson The Northwestern Michigan College board and President Tim Nelson should be ashamed of their bad faith negotiations with the faculty. The faculty have received no raise this year, even though all other college staff have received raises. Mr. Nelson is set to receive a $20,000 raise...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Vincent Pernicano
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Vincent Pernicano

Kristi Kates - October 26th, 2009
Boyne Falls Artist Goes International Vincent Pernicano
By Kristi Kates 10/26/09

“I can’t really say what people like best about my work,” Boyne Falls artist Vincent Pernicano says, “I’m just happy that some find it interesting and tell me that they enjoy it.”
“Some” finding it interesting is an understatement, given the rapidly-growing popularity and acclaim of this skillful artisan’s creations.
Originally from Detroit - primarily the Ferndale area - Pernicano began traveling Up North in his early 20s for skiing trips, and eventually bought a house with two good friends who left the state and sold their shares to Pernicano, who has lived in that same house with his family for the past 27 years.
“My studio is in our home, and I do welcome visitors, but I don’t have a formal display area, as space is limited. If I happen to be working when visitors stop by, they are welcome to observe - but, depending on what I am working on, it may be about as interesting as watching paint dry,” Pernicano chuckles.
Pernicano says that he practices three variations of technique that use glass as the unifying material.
“The first and oldest technique that I developed combines glass with copper, brass and silver overlay to make a variety of jewelry pieces as well as ornaments and sculpture,” he explains. “For the second technique, I fuse layers of colored glass together in a kiln to make what I call glass stones or jewels; I then use these stones to make pins, pendants and earrings or to embellish various other works. For my third technique, I use glass in combination with painting to create three-dimensional pictures or scenes. I also enjoy glass blowing but only get to practice it occasionally.”
As seen in the many bright colors and striking shapes of his works, Pernicano is primarily inspired by nature.
“I am inspired in all of my work by everyday life, the natural beauty of our planet, and the mysteries of the universe,” he says, “I try to create positive images of a better world, and believe that one of reasons we are here is to help evolve life to a higher plane.”
Pernicano sells most of his work at art fairs, which he has found the best way to showcase his art.
“Art fairs allow people to view a body of work, and also allow me to meet and communicate with those who find it interesting,” he says.

BOYNE TO JAPAN
One of those who found his work very interesting indeed is a woman named Midori Ueda-Okahana - who just happens to be the director of the Yokohama International Open-Art Fair in Japan. Meeting Ueda-Okahana would prove to be a wonderful happenstance for Pernicano, who will now be one of only 10 artists from outside of Japan who has received an invitation to show his work at this prestigious event October 30 through November 1.
“Last year at the Ann Arbor Art Fair, a woman came into my booth and spent some time looking at my work. She asked me if I would be interested in going to Japan to do an art fair - I told her that I would love to do an art fair in Japan, but I thought that the cost would be prohibitive. She told me that her group was working on ways to financially help the invited artists and that she would be in touch via e-mail. She said that they were inviting a total of ten artists from the U.S. and Canada. A few months later she wrote to say that they were going to pay our transportation to and from Japan, pay the shipping for our work, build display booths for us, and provide translators and take care of customs for us. Delphi Stained Glass, who I buy most of my glass supplies from, has agreed help me with some of my other travel expenses.”
The purpose of Ueda-Okahana’s organization, she explained, was to promote art and art fairs in Japan. Apparantly, art is only available at this time through galleries in Japan; the art fairs that most Northern Michigan residents and visitors are so used to seeing every summer, where anyone can view and purchase art, simply do not exist, something that Ueda-Okahana is trying to change.
Pernicano’s trip to Japan in a couple of weeks - which will be his first art show overseas - will expose his art to a whole new audience; but for him, it’s just as much about the process as it is the finished product.
“I enjoy all aspects of my work, from the original concept to the finished piece,” he says, “it’s not a job, it’s a journey, and at the end of the journey I sometimes have a piece that someone else will enjoy looking at. My greatest reward is the smile I see on the face of someone who has stopped to look at my work.”
Vincent Pernicano’s artwork may be viewed online at www.blueskyglass.com, which shows a variety of his jewelry and 3-D work, as well as his art show itinerary for the year in Michigan, Ohio, and Florida. Pernicano’s fused-glass pendants and earrings are also carried locally by the Art and Soul Gallery in Traverse City.

 
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