Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Random Thoughts: Untying the knots of justice

Robert Downes - November 2nd, 2009
Random Thoughts
Robert Downes 11/2/09
Untying the Knots of Injustice
We get a lot of requests to investigate stories of the “she said, he said” variety here at the Express. Often, these are a result of a perceived failure of the local courts and the feeling that justice has been denied.
Custody battles, disputes with builders, issues over getting fired, anger over court decisions and claims of harassment by the cops... these are typical of the requests we receive at the Express on a weekly basis. Many requests involve knotty issues that could take days or weeks to unravel, if ever.
Sometimes, people feel they’ve gotten the runaround by the law, or they’ve taken their problem along with an eight-page summary all the way to Michigan’s attorney general, where it is most likely sitting in a file cabinet or a waste basket.
Some people with grievances have taken no legal action at all, but are “planning” to sue a shady builder or the boss who fired them unfairly. These callers often feel that a newspaper article listing all of the injustices against them will somehow fix the problem, or at least offer the satisfaction of sticking it to the person who did them wrong.
The problem for any news organization is that there are always two sides of a story, separated by what is often a muddy field of half-truths. And unlike in a court of law, where perjury can lead to a fine and/or a prison sentence, you can get pretty creative with what you tell a newspaper: omitting damning details, embroidering the truth, painting yourself as an angel while the other guy is a devil... you get the picture.
This is why newspapers rely heavily on legal documentation and the confirmation of the facts by at least two sources.
It’s also why we sometimes throw up our hands at the possibility of approaching worthy stories that seem too complicated and filled with pitfalls for us to handle. The simple truth is that not everyone can be a “winner” in court -- or in a newspaper article.
Recently, for instance, a woman called regarding a custody battle with her ex-husband that involved more than 20 years of abuse. She said her husband had framed her in a case involving theft from her employer. Subsequently, she lost her job and her home.
She spelled out a horrific tale of abuse, bound to a cruel man for more than two decades who ripped her off and has left her with nothing.
“I would have been better off killing him,” she said, alluding to the alleged murder of State Police officer Melvin Paul Holbrook by his wife Joni in Frankfort. Six years or so of prison would have been better than more than 20 years of hell with her husband.
Interesting story? Yes. Difficult to approach? Extremely. Because each allegation of abuse in a story like this has to be backed up by court records or police reports for us to even begin reporting on it. Not to mention getting the husband’s side, which tends to be 180 degrees in the opposite direction with an entirely different set of allegations, all of which also have to be checked out.
You calculate the time it will take to invest in such a story and realize it may take weeks. And the outcome may not be what the person who contacted you desires, since there is, of course, always “another side to the story.”
In our current issue, for instance, investigative reporter Anne Stanton spent months tracking down information for her exclusive interview with Anne Avery Miller. There’s so much to this story and its side issues that it could easily fill a book. Many of the details in Anne’s article could be stand-alone stories on their own.
One can only imagine that there must be similar tales of woe and a stack of statements three feet high on the desk of every Friend of the Court in the nation.
So if justice sometimes goes astray in our court system, perhaps it’s because people tend to get themselves so deeply entangled in their domestic problems that the knots upon knots become impossible to unravel.
In the case cited above, I wondered why the woman didn’t simply walk away from her husband 10, 15, or even 20 years ago when she began to realize that he was a bad apple. Wouldn‘t that be better than regretting that you didn‘t kill someone you once professed to love?
But then, I’ve known many women who’ve stayed in abusive relationships for years for their kids’ sake. They know they can’t afford to raise their kids on their own, and if they bail out on their marriage they fear their husband will win custody.
Result? Unhappy stories with unhappy endings. Solution? I‘m no Ann Landers, but I would say, don’t tie that knot to begin with, because there are some bonds that no court or newspaper story can untie.

 
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