Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Random Thoughts: More cultural stuff? Not so fast...

Robert Downes - November 9th, 2009
Random Thoughts:More cultural stuff? Not so fast...
Robert Downes 11/9/09

The big entertainment news in Traverse City this month involves the possibility of East Lansing’s Wharton Center of Performing Arts taking over the management of our City Opera House.
Drawing on the creative power and resources of Michigan State University, the Wharton Center earns rave reviews from theater-goers for bringing Broadway
musicals such as Wicked to East Lansing, along with dozens of musical acts and comedians each year.
It sounds like a slam-dunk good idea when you look at their roster of upcoming performances by the likes of Jerry Seinfeld, Jeff
Foxworthy, Wilco and The Lion King. Negotiations are underway to see what Wharton can do for the City Opera House, with a proposal to be presented to the TC City Commission later this month.
Still, the philistine in me says we should think this over, lest we “toss the baby with the bathwater.”
The City Opera House is still struggling to pay off the debt on its $8.5 million renovation -- a project which was supported by community fundraising efforts. One might think that this is all the more reason to hand off its management to the pros in East Lansing, right?
Well, maybe. But before Traverse City takes the bait, it would be nice to know whether acts such as Jerry Seinfeld, Wilco and The Lion King would actually make the trip up here to Tiny Town to perform in our 730-seat opera house. And at what cost?
By contrast, the Cobb Great Hall at the Wharton Center in East Lansing seats 2,500 people. Wharton’s Concert Auditorium seats 3,763. And chances are, you couldn‘t stage a credible Broadway production at our opera house on par with Wicked; that sort of thing requires a specially-designed theater with trapdoors, a fly space, and actors whizzing around on cables and such.
It seems more likely that Traverse City would get the “lesser” acts with a high-culture bent, which we already have in spades at Interlochen and the Dennos Museum Center.
Acts like the Shaolin Warriors, Itzhak Perlman, The Nutcracker, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas musical, and the Moscow Festival Ballet’s production of Coppelia. Ho-hum... Zzzz...
Excuse me for falling asleep here, but those acts -- which are on Wharton’s roster for the next few months -- are the exact same snoozy fare we‘ve come to expect from Interlochen during the “off” season. Been there, done that, seen ’em all a dozen times.
They are worthy acts, and they have their place (at Interlochen), but are they what Traverse
City needs to inject a lively sense of energy and excitement
downtown?
Currently, there’s a huge controversy about the recent
Umphrey’s McGee jam band show that was held at the opera house a few weeks ago. The concert-goers scuffed up the floor with their dancing and some of them were reportedly overserved. But no arrests were made and the show was widely regarded as the “best” of the year by opinion-makers in this town.
That show from Porterhouse Productions also brought more than 700 young adult professionals downtown, filling restaurants, stores and nightclubs. For the moment, at least, TC really was the sort of “Cool City” that our state aspires to.
You know: a city that is so cool and compelling that it attracts new businesses, young professionals and jobs, generating a lively downtown and a great place to live.
Those young adults in their early 20s are the future of our downtown and of the City Opera House. It would be a grave mistake to turn that crowd away simply to facilitate a management contract, because brother, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas isn‘t going to cut it with the people who are shaping Northern Michigan’s future.

 
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