Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · Region Watch: Med pot...
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Region Watch: Med pot grower faces jail/ Want to tell a great story?

Anne Stanton - November 9th, 2009
Region Watch:Med pot grower faces trial/Want to tell a great story?
By Anne Stanton 11/09/09

Archie Kiel, a “caregiver” who grows marijuana plants for himself and several other medical marijuana patients, was arraigned in 13th Circuit Court last week on felony charges for growing more than the legal limit of plants.
He pled not guilty. Kiel has a jury status conference on December 9—the final date on whether he can decide to plead or go to trial.
Charged with manufacture of more than 20 plants and less than 200, Kiel of Rapid City will likely stand trial in December, unless the judge agrees to dismiss his case, said his attorney Ross Hickman.
Hickman says he wishes the prosecutor would just drop the case. “At best, here’s a guy who was trying to abide by the law, and thought he was and made a mistake. It’s certainly possible he didn’t make a mistake. It just doesn’t seem appropriate to hang him out to dry for this,” Hickman said.
Kalkaska County Assistant Prosecutor Kirk Metzger, who is handling the case, said he understands Hickman’s position, but obviously disagrees.
“We don’t feel it was merely a mistake. He wasn’t in compliance with the law. I respect Mr. Hickman, don’t get me wrong on that, but we have a fundamental disagreement on proceeding with the prosecution. I don’t think it was a good faith mistake. He simply was not in compliance. It’s very specific what you’re allowed to do under these exceptions.”
Kiel was featured in the Express in late August as a grower who was dedicated to the medicinal uses of marijuana. He decided to go public in an effort to educate people about the new state medical marijuana law. But after the article ran, he was busted by the Traverse Narcotics Team for growing more than the allowable six plants per person.
At issue is the affirmative defense under the law, which Hickman contends gives the caregiver the legal ability to grow enough marijuana to provide an uninterrupted supply for his patients. Also at issue is exactly when a person can be considered a legal patient under the law—when he or she has evidence of a signed physician’s statement, after a certain period of sending in an application to the state for the patient card, or when the patient receives the actual card from the state. Finally, there’s the question of exactly what documents the caregiver must present when confronted by law enforcement.
Metzger believes the caregiver must be able to present cards for each patient when officers show up at the door.
Hickman plans to file a motion to dismiss within the next two weeks. The stakes are high if the case continues to trial. The normal maximum for the felony charge is seven years in prison, but in Kiel’s case, it doubles to 14 years since there was a prior misdemeanor for possession, Metzger said.
About 15 people showed up at last week‘s arraignment in support of Kiel, coming from as far as Lansing, Grand Rapids, and West Branch. Most belonged to Michigan NORML, which supports legalization of marijuana.
“There were certainly more people there than normal, no pun or anything,” said Hickman.
Kiel, whose favorite phrase is “be happy,” said he’s frustrated that he hasn’t been able to say anything in court yet.
“My lawyer only said 10 words,” he said. “I have a whole long speech on the whole incident. But everything is all for the better, it’s all helping awareness of the law. When it’s all said and done, there will be a clear definition of what’s legal. I was within the bounds of the laws, and it will come to light. It will help everyone else.”

Want to tell a great story?
Whether you‘re interested in writing The Great American Novel, or just want to improve your blog, there‘s something for everyone at the “Courting the Muse - Writer’s Conference” on Friday, Nov. 20, from 9. a.m to 5 p.m.
Hosted by Northwestern Michigan College in partnership with Michigan Writers, the conference at NMC‘s Olesen Center is designed for the beginner, established writers, and all those in-between; it will include presentations and workshops designed to inspire and challenge your writing.
Author Benjamin Percy, (Language of Elk, Refresh, Refresh) leads the opening session, “The Single-Minded Writer” as well as a fiction workshop session. Percy is the winner of the 2008 Whitting Award and a contributor to Esquire and The Paris Review. He teaches in the MFA program at Iowa State University.
Two Northern Express staffers are among the presenters: reporter Anne Stanton will walk aspiring writers through the investigative reporting process, from getting the initial tip to writing a compelling story. Students should come to class prepared to talk about a story idea they’d like to pursue. Editor Robert Downes will talk about travel and adventure writing, based on his book, Planet Backpacker.
Other workshop leaders include authors Aaron Stander (Summer People, Deer Season); Elizabeth Buzzelli (Dead Dancing Women, Dead Floating Lovers); poet Fleda Brown (Reunion, Breathing In, Breathing Out); and Anne-Marie Oomen (Pulling Down the Barn, House of Fields). Also featured is screenwriter Lesley Tye.
The cost for the day is $95 and includes lunch. For info and to register visit www.nmc.edu/ees or call NMC at 231-995-1700.

 
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