Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Saving our history
. . . .

Saving our history

Harley L. Sachs - September 21st, 2009
Saving Our History
What happens if our digital
records get wiped out?
Harley L. Sachs 9/21/09

With the Internet buzzing with warnings about the threat from Iran or Korea of an EMP -- a destructive “electromagnetic pulse” -- that could disrupt America’s electrical grid, shut down communications, and wipe out all electronic circuitry and digital files, there’s a genuine risk that we can lose not only our current computer files, but our history.
If the entire digital store of human knowledge went up in smoke tomorrow, how would we know how to make anything? Without permanent records, the knowledge on how to do everything from smelting iron ore to building nuclear power plants would be lost.
Remember the Rosetta Stone? It was dug up by one of Napoleon’s soldiers in Egypt and has the same document carved into it in three languages, including the then-undecipherable hieroglyphics which took more than 20 years to decipher.
Years ago, thinking about the Rosetta Stone, I gave a talk at the annual meeting of the Society for Technical Communication using a box of sand and a five-and-a-quarter-inch computer disk. As a future archeologist, I reported we had found this artifact from the 20th century, a vinyl plastic object of uncertain use. To the horror of the attending audience, I took it apart and found a brown, coated plastic disk. Hmm. What could that be? Obviously, it was unreadable and useless.
In fact, if you pick up a five-and-a-quarter-inch computer disk at the Goodwill today, you probably can’t access the data on it, for the disks are no longer made and the drives exist only on obsolete computers destined for the recycling heaps. Technology moves too rapidly.
I kept some allegedly archival files on such disks in our safe, but when I wanted to check on them I found that the glue that held the felt cleaning pad to the inside of the vinyl cover had leaked through and damaged the magnetic surface of the data disk inside. It was useless. Disks don’t last, and CDs have a shelf life of five to 15 years. Magnetic tape on old reel-to-reel recordings gets brittle and there’s through-print as the magnetic record creeps.
Yet old manuscripts in my 14 file drawers of hard copies typed on paper, some going back 60 years, are still readable, even thought the early ones were on the cheapest yellow foolscap.
What’s scary is that the Library of Congress is currently digitizing its holdings. Yes, it saves space. The digital versions of my drawers full of manuscripts after 1983 when I got the first computer easily fit on a single one gigabyte flash drive. It’s amazing. And my CD “Library of the Future” holds 5,000 titles, including some audio clips; but what’s its shelf life?
Knowing the limited shelf life of those digital files, the whole collection will have to be transferred every 15 years or so to the latest storage medium or the library will go the route of the IBM census on punch cards.
An old Master Sergeant in the California National Guard keeps a couple of manual typewriters hidden in the back of a store room against the day when all the computers crash. We still have a couple of portables. Time to advertise on eBay:
“For sale: machine that makes archival quality copies; requires no batteries or electric power source, is immune from EMP attack or power grid failure.”
We have two archival machines, a Royal portable my mother used and my 1940 Underwood from the era of Ernie Pyle (Ernie Pyle? Who was that? Another story…).
Now all I need are some fresh typewriter ribbons. There’s an old cheapskate’s trick: drip some lubricant onto the spools of dry ribbon to bring it back to life. The first few pages may be oil spattered, and eventually even that method won’t work when the ink is finally gone. Shucks.

 
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