Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Just Take those Old Records off...
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Just Take those Old Records off the Shelf....

Nancy Sundstrom - July 22nd, 2004
Chris Colin is a talented young writer whose work has been featured in McSweeney’s and the New York Times Book Review, among other publications, and who served a respectable tenure as a writer and editor for Salon.com. When it was announced that his first book, a work of non-fiction, would hit the stands this summer, there was a fair amount of anticipation in literary circles.
When the subject matter was revealed, eyebrows were raised in a different way.
Conlon’s hot-off-the-presses book bears the hefty and intriguing title, “What Really Happened to the Class of ‘93: Start-ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations Through an Untidy Decade.” What begat both curiosity and skepticism was that Conlon put forth the premise that his graduating high school class was a microcosm for a slew of the most significant events that history and pop culture could muster between 1993 and now.
Conlon’s take was that he and his classmates left high school for the real world midway through 1993 with a spirit of optimism that hadn’t been present in American youth for nearly 40 years. They’d weathered the jaded, decadent, money-grubbing, me-oriented era of the big ‘80s, and it now smelled like teen invincibility. After all, Clinton was newly installed in the White House, Big Brother no longer lurked in the form of the former Soviet Union, and the mere suggestion of a new thing called dot.coms promised lucrative, unlimited easy streets.
When the author and his classmates reunited for their 10-year reunion, the mood was noticeably different; enough so to move Conlon to write a book that examined what had taken place during that time. The other bookend to all the aforementioned optimism was a brilliant, disgraced leader who crawled away from the presidency under a cloud of scandal, the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York City on a beautiful September day when America fell under attack, and a staggering economic downturn. There was also the chaos of personal lives put asunder by all the things that can tear a seemingly normal life apart.
Conlon profiled a diverse group of 20 of his 1993 classmates from Thomas Jefferson School of Science and Technology in Virginia, prefacing each individual story with comments by other classmates. Here is an excerpt dedicated to Chris Sununu, a minor celebrity of the school due to his rather infamous father, John:

“Wes Black: “Friends of ours would come up to him and spread their arms like an airplane, make airplane noises. He’d get pissed off. He was probably a little embarrassed about the whole [scandal involving his father]. I think that hurt him. He was a good person.”
Rebecca (Gray) Lamey: “I went head-to-head with Chris constantly. Usually what ended up happening was, he always had all the guys on his side, and I always had all the girls on my side. Something about him -- there were a lot of guys laughing and applauding him that wouldn’t have normally. One argument I remember was about the differences between the sexes. He and I ended up getting pretty heated. He was going on about how if he took a woman to prom, and rented a limo, and bought her dinner, he’d better get reimbursed for it at the end of the night. I said, ‘You’d expect her to put out just because you spent money on her?’ And he said, ‘Yes, definitely.’
Wayne Steward: “He was your typical straight guy’s guy. Our lockers were near each other. We disagreed on stuff, but at no point did I ever have a really nasty interaction with him. At no point did he ever come up to me and say something overtly prejudiced. Then again, I was already out, you know? What, you’re going to walk down the hall and call me faggot? I’d just turn around and say, ‘I know!’”
Vanya (Seaman) Wright: “Freshman year I went to Karen Taggart’s birthday party – everyone was invited. It was at a mall, and we were trying to get seated at a restaurant there and we couldn’t get in. We walked around and around for 45 minutes. Then Chris mumbled, ‘I never have to wait for a table when I’m with my dad.’ We went back and changed the name to Sununu and got right in -- though maybe they were going to let us in then anyway.”
John Helmantoler: “I really liked Chris. He was a great guy… Politically, his reputation was that of a Rush Limbaugh/Fox News type. That was definitely an accurate portrayal of him. He was definitely of that ‘intolerant’ camp -- I suppose I was, too -- though it’s a bad word. He was of that party line -- ‘What the hell’s going on? We’re making these people heroes and martyrs for coming out of the closet!’ In our defense, we hadn’t seen this before. It’s usually not until college that you start seeing this stuff, and for us it was happening in high school.”

Conlin’s school was a specialized one located just outside of Washington, D.C, and its students were, for the most part, bright and gifted, with unlimited potential. Among his classmates were Karen, a rebel who walked out of her LSAT exam and became an inner-city teacher; Ryan, who drifted to Buddhism after giving up his dream of being a doctor; and Lesley. We also meet the homecoming queen who morphed into Fair Trade activist, the transgendered Matthew/Anne, and others, whose stories touch on the war in Kosovo, being an unwed mother, leftist politics and a love of weaponry, to name just a few.
For the most part, they are all compelling stories, and Conlin is a skilled enough writer to dig for texture in his portraits of the class nerd, prom queen and local nympho, but the greater question is whether the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Do we as a society, or for that matter, does Conlin have enough perspective to be able to wax nostalgically about a time period just 10-years-old? Do the people represented here really speak for that era and define a generation in the way the author wishes them to?
In some ways, what really emerges here is a picture of a period in time, perhaps more so than of a group of individuals, but however one interprets what Conlin presents, his book is candid and generally engaging. In some ways, there’s a part of each one of us that will always be steeped in our high school lore, and there’s a timelessness in that thought that will resonate with readers and carry us back to a time when innocence, and yes, optimism, didn’t seem so far away.
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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