Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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An old ice house makes history as Stafford‘s Gallery

Kristi Kates - November 30th, 2009
An Old Ice House
Makes History as Stafford’s Gallery
By Kristi Kates
Getting creative with an historic building was a challenge at first for Stafford’s Hospitality in Petoskey.
Stafford’s purchased the former Longton Hall Antiques building in the fall of 2007, as a “natural addition” to its Perry Hotel, according to Stafford’s Lisa Wilbur. Located adjacent to the Perry’s parking lot, ideas on what to do with the building were many, but a decision had yet to be made.
There were many things to consider; the building itself, for one, was unique in that it had been built in the late 1800s as an ice house, meaning it carried plenty of history as well as interesting architecture and antiques within.
“As a member of the Historic Hotels of America, Stafford’s felt that it was important to continue to tell the story of hospitality in Northern Michigan,” Wilbur says. Wilbur, who had been an art consultant for the past six years, met with Stafford’s business manager David Marvin, and the two of them saw the potential of a gallery in the ice house space. A few renovations later, and Stafford’s Gallery of Art and History was opened in June 2008, with Wilbur installed as gallery manager.

HISTORY AND HOSPITALITY
“The Gallery’s goal is to offer a great variety of fine art, with a selection varying from traditional to contemporary works to meet the style of a collector or first-time art buyer,” Wilbur says.
The building offers a look back into Petoskey’s olden days. Guests can still walk through the freezer doors of the ice house, and into different rooms that Wilbur says still have the original glazed block walls, ice chutes, and delivery entrances.
“All of these unique characteristics make the perfect backdrop for displaying art work, and our Hall of History room also showcases a collection of photos and artifacts representing the history of downtown Petoskey from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, with emphasis on the 22 hotels that were located downtown.”

MUST STOP SPOT
Representing 45 Michigan artists, from established to new and emerging talents, Stafford’s Gallery has become a place that both locals and out-of-town guests frequent when looking for new artwork.
A wide range of mediums, styles, and prices are available at the Gallery as are many of Northern Michigan’s most popular artists. Wilbur says that the most popular artworks so far include Todd Warner’s whimsical sculptures; Kevin Barton’s brightly-colored paintings; Mimi Prussack’s birch trees in oil and wax; George Peebles’ contemporary landscape paintings; and Kathleen C. Fritz’ giclee prints.
Photography, pottery, handblown glass, and custom jewelry are also represented, as are display antiques and a range of special events slated to further introduce people to both the Gallery itself and the local art scene.
Special events over the year will include a Gallery “Wine Down Hour” on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings (4 p.m.) in the fall; Stafford’s Featured Studio Artist events, in which artists will set up to paint within the gallery; a “Perry Paint-Out” in which select artists from the Gallery will paint plein-air style in the Garden Veranda, followed by an auction; and participation in Petoskey’s Gallery Walk in June.

For more information on Stafford’s Gallery of Art and History, visit www.staffordsgallery.com, or telephone 231-347-0142; the Gallery is located directly next to Stafford’s Perry Hotel at 118 Lewis Street in downtown Petoskey.

 
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