Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · An old ice house makes history as...
. . . .

An old ice house makes history as Stafford‘s Gallery

Kristi Kates - November 30th, 2009
An Old Ice House
Makes History as Stafford’s Gallery
By Kristi Kates
Getting creative with an historic building was a challenge at first for Stafford’s Hospitality in Petoskey.
Stafford’s purchased the former Longton Hall Antiques building in the fall of 2007, as a “natural addition” to its Perry Hotel, according to Stafford’s Lisa Wilbur. Located adjacent to the Perry’s parking lot, ideas on what to do with the building were many, but a decision had yet to be made.
There were many things to consider; the building itself, for one, was unique in that it had been built in the late 1800s as an ice house, meaning it carried plenty of history as well as interesting architecture and antiques within.
“As a member of the Historic Hotels of America, Stafford’s felt that it was important to continue to tell the story of hospitality in Northern Michigan,” Wilbur says. Wilbur, who had been an art consultant for the past six years, met with Stafford’s business manager David Marvin, and the two of them saw the potential of a gallery in the ice house space. A few renovations later, and Stafford’s Gallery of Art and History was opened in June 2008, with Wilbur installed as gallery manager.

HISTORY AND HOSPITALITY
“The Gallery’s goal is to offer a great variety of fine art, with a selection varying from traditional to contemporary works to meet the style of a collector or first-time art buyer,” Wilbur says.
The building offers a look back into Petoskey’s olden days. Guests can still walk through the freezer doors of the ice house, and into different rooms that Wilbur says still have the original glazed block walls, ice chutes, and delivery entrances.
“All of these unique characteristics make the perfect backdrop for displaying art work, and our Hall of History room also showcases a collection of photos and artifacts representing the history of downtown Petoskey from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, with emphasis on the 22 hotels that were located downtown.”

MUST STOP SPOT
Representing 45 Michigan artists, from established to new and emerging talents, Stafford’s Gallery has become a place that both locals and out-of-town guests frequent when looking for new artwork.
A wide range of mediums, styles, and prices are available at the Gallery as are many of Northern Michigan’s most popular artists. Wilbur says that the most popular artworks so far include Todd Warner’s whimsical sculptures; Kevin Barton’s brightly-colored paintings; Mimi Prussack’s birch trees in oil and wax; George Peebles’ contemporary landscape paintings; and Kathleen C. Fritz’ giclee prints.
Photography, pottery, handblown glass, and custom jewelry are also represented, as are display antiques and a range of special events slated to further introduce people to both the Gallery itself and the local art scene.
Special events over the year will include a Gallery “Wine Down Hour” on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings (4 p.m.) in the fall; Stafford’s Featured Studio Artist events, in which artists will set up to paint within the gallery; a “Perry Paint-Out” in which select artists from the Gallery will paint plein-air style in the Garden Veranda, followed by an auction; and participation in Petoskey’s Gallery Walk in June.

For more information on Stafford’s Gallery of Art and History, visit www.staffordsgallery.com, or telephone 231-347-0142; the Gallery is located directly next to Stafford’s Perry Hotel at 118 Lewis Street in downtown Petoskey.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close