Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


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Thai yoga massage from Thailand

Erin Cowell - March 2nd, 2009
Thai yoga massage from Thailand
Erin Cowell 3/2/09


In dance, one partner leads the other, always guiding and moving with the music, creating an energy that can be invigorating, releasing and therapeutic, all at the same time.
In order to understand Thai yoga massage (TYM), it’s best to think of it in terms of dancing. Therapeutic massage generally involves a passive client laying nearly unconscious on a table with a masseuse working over him or her. But with TYM, both client and masseuse are on the floor, working in a three-dimensional space of movement. The partner leading is the masseuse, guiding the other through a series of deep stretches and massage.
The result is a comprehensive full-body treatment. Like therapeutic massage, it relieves muscular tension, improves circulation, boosts the immune system and balances the body’s energy. However, the benefits of TYM outlast those of basic massage through movement and correct posture.
Sally Trombly, a certified Thai yoga massage therapist at Living Light Massage & Wellness Center in Traverse City, believes those two elements are key to long-term health.
“When they say mind/body connection, there’s actually science behind that statement. The brain controls the musculature of the body. Sensory-motor amnesia occurs as we grow older, causing disconnection with certain areas of our body. Thai yoga massage works to re-educate and reconnect the mind and body,” Trombly says.
Although fairly new to the Western Hemisphere, TYM has been practiced for more than 2,500 years. Originating in India, it evolved from traditional Thai massage within the environment of Buddhist temples.
“Thai massage is a well-respected and proven healing art that’s quickly gaining popularity in the West because of its meditative approach and its application of yoga’s well-established benefits,” says Kam Thye Chow, founder of The Lotus Palm: School of Thai Yoga Massage in Montreal, Canada.
If TYM is a dance, then “prana” would be the music. It’s believed that when “prana” – being the fundamental life force of energy circulating within the body – is blocked or restricted, then sickness or disease can result. TYM clears those blockages through palming and thumbing along pressure points.
Like basic yoga, TYM allows a person to gradually stretch and move their body to a level beyond their everyday movement. Because of this, TYM is ideal for anyone. Elderly people can gradually increase flexibility while helping relieve the effects of osteoporosis. Athletes get an even deeper stretch beyond what they normally do alone. And everyone in between can reawaken the body, participating in this old, yet modern-day dance.

For more information on Thai Yoga Massage, call Living Light Massage & Wellness Center at 231-995-9697.

 
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