Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · One way to end the war...
. . . .

One way to end the war forever: tax it

Robert Downes - December 7th, 2009
“Any tax is a discouragement and therefore a regulation so far as it goes.”
-- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

One idea that went nowhere recently was a proposal by two
legislators to slap a new tax on the wealthy to finance the war in
Afghanistan.
A pity, because if we citizens really wanted to end war forever --
or at least keep our wars short and sweet -- we would rise up and
demand that every American be taxed to pay for whatever new conflict
our president or Congress dreams up.
Crazy? Yeah, sure. But consider...
It’s common knowledge that Americans hate taxes. Possibly, we hate
taxes even more than we love the sort of foaming-at-the-mouth
patriotic fever that kicks off every new war that comes along. So if
we knew in advance that going to war would mean an automatic tax
hike... well, you get the picture.
Overnight, you’d find anti-tax conservatives transformed into
flower-waving peaceniks.
Most likely, Americans were angry enough in the wake of 9/11 to
have upped their own taxes to pay for the war in Afghanistan, but that
fight would be long over by now if we were still paying. And Iraq?
That war would have blown up on the launching pad if the Bush
administration had ‘dropped the bomb’ on you that you were going to be
taxed an extra $1,000 to $5,000 per year to pay for it.
Can you imagine how popular our wars would be on talk radio if
Americans knew they’d have to pay through the nose for all of those
$30,000 smart bombs we toss around like candy at a parade?
Actually, in a roundabout way, that‘s how it’s supposed to work
under the U.S. Constitution, only the mechanism for paying for our
wars has been broken beyond repair by Washington‘s practice of
borrowing money to pay for them.
When America’s founding fathers wrote the Constitution some 220
years ago, they decreed in Article 1, Section 8 that only Congress has
the power to declare war, in addition to the responsibility of raising
the funds to pay for it.
The founding fathers stuck Congress with the task of paying for our
wars because they knew that our senators and congressmen would have to
drum up the money for all of the guns, ammo and troops from their
constituents. How? Through taxes.
Thus, there was a lot of incentive to end wars quickly -- not just
to avoid the death of family members -- but also to get the
government’s war taxes off your back.
Consider that during World War II, the tax rate went higher than
90% for the wealthiest Americans, with the tax pain spread throughout
the population. World War II was the biggest shoot-out in history, yet
America’s share of it ran just a little over three and a half years.
By contrast, the war in Afghanistan is entering its ninth year and
we’ll soon be heading into our seventh year with the war in Iraq.
That‘s because today, Congress simply votes to borrow more money to
pay for our wars, so no one has a care in the world... for the short
term, anyway.
You can bet that Americans were a lot more motivated to end World
War II asap than they are Iraq and Afghanistan for the simple reason
that there’s no sacrifice of any kind for most of us.
Recently, Rep. David Obey, D-WI., chairman of the U.S. House
Appropriations Committee, called for a “war surtax” to pay for our
additional 30,000 troops in Afghanistan. Each of those soldiers will
cost our country an estimated $1 million per year.
Before backpedaling on the idea, Obey said that a war surtax is one
of simple fairness. “The problem with this issue is that the only
people that have to sacrifice are military families and they’ve had to
go to the well again and again and again and again, and everybody else
is blithely unaffected by the war.”
Similarly, U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, (D-MI) chairman of the Senate
Armed Services Committee, recommended a tax on Americans making more
than $200,000 or $250,000.
But that’s not fair: a war tax should apply to all Americans as a
civic duty. If you’re a wealthy citizen who hates war, why should you
have to pay extra while some gung-ho, war-loving redneck of limited
means goes scot-free?
To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, when you’re in a war, you either
“hang together or you hang separately.” Only when every American has
to pay up to finance our wars will we ever muster the kind of
political backlash that ends them quickly... or stops war dead in its
tracks before the first shot can be fired.
So, this is a utopian idea that could never come to pass, but we
citizens should recognize that Congress has failed in its
responsibility to seek taxes to pay for our wars, thus prolonging them
and passing on the debt to our children’s children. We should
consider a constitutional amendment requiring an across-the-board
automatic tax on every citizen any time our president or Congress
hatches a new war plan.
If that ever happened, you can bet that Washington would be hearing
plenty of battle cries -- but those rebel yells would be coming from
the homefront before the cannonballs even started to fly.

 
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