Letters

Letters 04-25-2016

Taking Our Trees Seconds ago this pine tree was alive. Well, Mr. Cook — our County Road Commission head —and Peninsula Township government … by not weighing in (I guess it’s not your problem or responsibility to communicate with residents), you allowed the County Road Commission to bulldoze down huge swaths of lakeside trees in order to increase the bike lane. This can’t be happening. I have no clue why they would cut trees down that help block snow from creating drifts on Peninsula Drive and help keep the beach area intact. Plus, they are not increasing the width of the road when they repave. I just don’t get it. This is amateur hour at county and township government...

Government Service Unrewarded I served the federal government for XX years with the [agency], [doing XX]. I also worked in the private sector, [doing XX]. When I retired, I was surprised to learn my Social Security benefit would be $XXX less per month than my colleagues and neighbors who had never worked for the federal government. This is all because of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) under the Social Security law...

Which Greased Palm Now that “Chicago values” have utterly corrupted the executive and judicial branches of our federal government, this November We the Plebeians shall either vote to right the governing integrity of the United States constitution’s twin pillars of limited government and separation of powers or turn and step collectively onto the blood soaked road to serfdom...

The Political Mess And Challenge As citizens we are faced with a real challenge. The media and the political candidates have taken over a year to attack those whom they are opposing. The unfavorable ratings of those who may be nominated are above 50 percent. That should be no surprise, considering the length of time given to bloodying one another with opinions that have little relationship to truth. The polling companies, which confess they are not reliable, make everything a game of winning...

CORRECTIONS In last week’s issue we had photos with the incorrect stories on page five. The dance photo should have accompanied the story about grants to nonprofits. The image of Crooked Tree Arts Center Petoskey should have accompanied the story about the ArtPrize exhibit at CTAC.

We also reported the incorrect day for the Bayshore Marathon in Traverse City. The correct date is Sat., May 28.

We apologize for these errors.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Happy Ending/Lori Montroy
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Happy Ending/Lori Montroy

Anne Stanton - January 11th, 2010
Happy Ending
Medical marijuana patient gets to stay in her home
By Anne Stanton
Lori Montroy no longer has to worry about getting evicted from her Elk
Rapids apartment for growing medical marijuana plants, but the reprieve
doesn’t necessarily apply to other medical marijuana patients who live in
federally subsidized apartments.
Montroy, who has the deadliest form of brain cancer, received an eviction
notice in early December after telling Susan Grodi, the manager of Elk
Rapids Apartments, that she was growing marijuana in her closet. Grodi is
employed by the property management firm of the Gardner Group of Michigan.
Soon after the eviction fueled national publicity following an Express
article, it was put on hold by the USDA (United States Department of
Agriculture) Rural Development of Michigan, which owns the building.
On December 23, Montroy said that James Turner, the director of the USDA’s
state office, called her to say the eviction notice was formally
withdrawn.
Montroy, who was feeling very ill when contacted, kept the interview
brief: “Praise the Lord!” she said.

POLICY STRUGGLE
USDA officials have not announced a policy for all medical marijuana
patients living in subsidized apartments, said Alec Lloyd, public
information coordinator for the USDA Michigan office.
Under the Obama administration, the official policy of the U.S. government
has been not to prosecute medical marijuana patients who comply with state
drug laws. Medical marijuana is legal in the state, but against federal
law. The issue is a difficult one because the controlled substance federal
law must be weighed with other federal laws, such as civil rights laws and
the right to obtain legal medical treatment, Lloyd said.
Montroy began using marijuana in 2006 to help with fatigue, nausea and
crippling headaches. Montroy told Grodi she was growing marijuana during a
random search of her apartment.
Lloyd said Montroy’s eviction notice during the holidays was a “P.R.
disaster” for USDA Rural Development of Michigan, who give rural residents
a tremendous amount of help. Last year, the agency helped more than 7,500
rural families in the state pay their monthly rent. “Even if it were July
it would be just as unjust. We want to find out how we can help our
tenants and be in compliance with the federal law. Our mission is to
create a quality of life for rural people, and evicting someone with brain
cancer isn’t doing that. We are trying to do the right thing, but we don’t
get to pick and choose the laws we follow.”

ACLU OBJECTS
In a press release issued after Montroy’s eviction, the American Civil
Liberties Union of Michigan strenuously objected to Montroy’s eviction and
said that landlords of federally-assisted housing are not required to
evict tenants who violate federal drug laws. The ACLU maintained that the
Gardner Group had full discretion under federal law to allow Montroy to
stay in her home.
“Ms. Montroy is already engaged in a daily battle to stay alive,” the ACLU
wrote to the Gardner Group. “She is no danger to herself, her neighbors,
or her community... And yet, in the midst of this holiday season, Ms.
Montroy faces eviction from her apartment. You have the ability, and the
moral obligation, to prevent such a miscarriage of justice from taking
place.” 

 
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