Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Happy Ending/Lori Montroy
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Happy Ending/Lori Montroy

Anne Stanton - January 11th, 2010
Happy Ending
Medical marijuana patient gets to stay in her home
By Anne Stanton
Lori Montroy no longer has to worry about getting evicted from her Elk
Rapids apartment for growing medical marijuana plants, but the reprieve
doesn’t necessarily apply to other medical marijuana patients who live in
federally subsidized apartments.
Montroy, who has the deadliest form of brain cancer, received an eviction
notice in early December after telling Susan Grodi, the manager of Elk
Rapids Apartments, that she was growing marijuana in her closet. Grodi is
employed by the property management firm of the Gardner Group of Michigan.
Soon after the eviction fueled national publicity following an Express
article, it was put on hold by the USDA (United States Department of
Agriculture) Rural Development of Michigan, which owns the building.
On December 23, Montroy said that James Turner, the director of the USDA’s
state office, called her to say the eviction notice was formally
withdrawn.
Montroy, who was feeling very ill when contacted, kept the interview
brief: “Praise the Lord!” she said.

POLICY STRUGGLE
USDA officials have not announced a policy for all medical marijuana
patients living in subsidized apartments, said Alec Lloyd, public
information coordinator for the USDA Michigan office.
Under the Obama administration, the official policy of the U.S. government
has been not to prosecute medical marijuana patients who comply with state
drug laws. Medical marijuana is legal in the state, but against federal
law. The issue is a difficult one because the controlled substance federal
law must be weighed with other federal laws, such as civil rights laws and
the right to obtain legal medical treatment, Lloyd said.
Montroy began using marijuana in 2006 to help with fatigue, nausea and
crippling headaches. Montroy told Grodi she was growing marijuana during a
random search of her apartment.
Lloyd said Montroy’s eviction notice during the holidays was a “P.R.
disaster” for USDA Rural Development of Michigan, who give rural residents
a tremendous amount of help. Last year, the agency helped more than 7,500
rural families in the state pay their monthly rent. “Even if it were July
it would be just as unjust. We want to find out how we can help our
tenants and be in compliance with the federal law. Our mission is to
create a quality of life for rural people, and evicting someone with brain
cancer isn’t doing that. We are trying to do the right thing, but we don’t
get to pick and choose the laws we follow.”

ACLU OBJECTS
In a press release issued after Montroy’s eviction, the American Civil
Liberties Union of Michigan strenuously objected to Montroy’s eviction and
said that landlords of federally-assisted housing are not required to
evict tenants who violate federal drug laws. The ACLU maintained that the
Gardner Group had full discretion under federal law to allow Montroy to
stay in her home.
“Ms. Montroy is already engaged in a daily battle to stay alive,” the ACLU
wrote to the Gardner Group. “She is no danger to herself, her neighbors,
or her community... And yet, in the midst of this holiday season, Ms.
Montroy faces eviction from her apartment. You have the ability, and the
moral obligation, to prevent such a miscarriage of justice from taking
place.” 

 
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