Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Happy Ending/Lori Montroy
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Happy Ending/Lori Montroy

Anne Stanton - January 11th, 2010
Happy Ending
Medical marijuana patient gets to stay in her home
By Anne Stanton
Lori Montroy no longer has to worry about getting evicted from her Elk
Rapids apartment for growing medical marijuana plants, but the reprieve
doesn’t necessarily apply to other medical marijuana patients who live in
federally subsidized apartments.
Montroy, who has the deadliest form of brain cancer, received an eviction
notice in early December after telling Susan Grodi, the manager of Elk
Rapids Apartments, that she was growing marijuana in her closet. Grodi is
employed by the property management firm of the Gardner Group of Michigan.
Soon after the eviction fueled national publicity following an Express
article, it was put on hold by the USDA (United States Department of
Agriculture) Rural Development of Michigan, which owns the building.
On December 23, Montroy said that James Turner, the director of the USDA’s
state office, called her to say the eviction notice was formally
withdrawn.
Montroy, who was feeling very ill when contacted, kept the interview
brief: “Praise the Lord!” she said.

POLICY STRUGGLE
USDA officials have not announced a policy for all medical marijuana
patients living in subsidized apartments, said Alec Lloyd, public
information coordinator for the USDA Michigan office.
Under the Obama administration, the official policy of the U.S. government
has been not to prosecute medical marijuana patients who comply with state
drug laws. Medical marijuana is legal in the state, but against federal
law. The issue is a difficult one because the controlled substance federal
law must be weighed with other federal laws, such as civil rights laws and
the right to obtain legal medical treatment, Lloyd said.
Montroy began using marijuana in 2006 to help with fatigue, nausea and
crippling headaches. Montroy told Grodi she was growing marijuana during a
random search of her apartment.
Lloyd said Montroy’s eviction notice during the holidays was a “P.R.
disaster” for USDA Rural Development of Michigan, who give rural residents
a tremendous amount of help. Last year, the agency helped more than 7,500
rural families in the state pay their monthly rent. “Even if it were July
it would be just as unjust. We want to find out how we can help our
tenants and be in compliance with the federal law. Our mission is to
create a quality of life for rural people, and evicting someone with brain
cancer isn’t doing that. We are trying to do the right thing, but we don’t
get to pick and choose the laws we follow.”

ACLU OBJECTS
In a press release issued after Montroy’s eviction, the American Civil
Liberties Union of Michigan strenuously objected to Montroy’s eviction and
said that landlords of federally-assisted housing are not required to
evict tenants who violate federal drug laws. The ACLU maintained that the
Gardner Group had full discretion under federal law to allow Montroy to
stay in her home.
“Ms. Montroy is already engaged in a daily battle to stay alive,” the ACLU
wrote to the Gardner Group. “She is no danger to herself, her neighbors,
or her community... And yet, in the midst of this holiday season, Ms.
Montroy faces eviction from her apartment. You have the ability, and the
moral obligation, to prevent such a miscarriage of justice from taking
place.” 

 
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