Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · ‘Roids & baseball:...
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‘Roids & baseball: Soap opers never ends

George Foster - January 18th, 2010
‘Roids & Baseball: Soap opera never ends
Why is it that every time a Major League baseball star admits using
steroids, the sports world seems to erupt? By now we should be more
stunned when discovering a successful player from the 1980s or ‘90s DIDN’T
use performance-enhancing drugs.
Recently, when a teary-eyed Mark McGwire publically admitted to making a
“mistake” by using steroids throughout his storied career, another
firestorm engulfed the media. Is he really contrite for his actions?
Should McGwire be voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame? Has he been
punished enough?
It seems to me that these are still the wrong questions. The image of a
sobbing player, asking for forgiveness after being caught cheating, then
moving on with life as if nothing happened but breaking a few rules sends
the wrong message to other players and our kids.
We should be asking the sport of baseball how it can better educate young
athletes about the serious dangers of steroid use. Maybe some athletes
think they can live with known side effects such as acne, baldness, bad
breath, yellow teeth, nervousness, and height loss. It may even be worth
it for some men to look forward to a future existence with shrunken
testicles and breast development.
Yet, it could literally be impossible to live with the increased
propensity for heart attacks and liver damage brought on by steroids.
These drugs can kill you.
Beyond the obvious physical changes, increased aggression and violence
are the least understood side effects of these drugs. The ‘roid rage
phenomenon is blamed by many for the disproportionately large number of
body- builders accused of murder compared to other athletes.
’Roid rage may also help explain the reaction of McGwire’s former
teammate, Jose Canseco, the day after McGwire’s recent confession. Though
McGwire admitted to using steroids, he denied Canseco’s allegations about
him. Canseco wrote a book in 2005 about baseball and steroid use, claiming
that he introduced many baseball players to the drugs, including McGwire,
and injected him with drugs in bathroom stalls before games.
If there was ever an example of why steroids should be avoided at all
costs, Canseco’s juvenile actions should qualify him as the poster-boy.
After McGwire’s confession, Canseco exclaimed, “I can’t believe he called
me a liar.”
“I even polygraphed that I injected him, and I passed it completely. So I
want to challenge him on national TV to a polygraph examination. I want to
see him call me a liar under a polygraph examination.” Canseco was
scheduled to appear on “Larry King Live” that night, but said he had to
cancel due to the emotional stress that McGwire’s interview had caused
him.
Between McGwire’s sobbing confession and Canseco’s apparent emotional
meltdown, we are left wondering if the former “Bash Brothers” (as they
were know in their heyday) of the mighty Oakland A’s are still on
steroids. They have been reduced to the Bawling Brothers – a couple of
weepy drama queens only concerned about proving the other to be the bigger
liar.
If Major League Baseball was really serious about waging war on steroids
in sports it would strictly enforce the rules now in place and bar
admitted steroid users such as Mark McGwire from the sport effective
immediately. No playing or coaching, no Hall-of-Fame eligibility, no
attending games, no autograph signings, no connection with the game in any
way - unless the drug-abusing players paid a penance.
Their punishment would be to convincingly lecture youth groups over a year
on the dangers of steroid use. That way it might sink in for all of us
that using performance-enhancing drugs is far worse than making a simple
mistake.

 
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