Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · ‘Roids & baseball:...
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‘Roids & baseball: Soap opers never ends

George Foster - January 18th, 2010
‘Roids & Baseball: Soap opera never ends
Why is it that every time a Major League baseball star admits using
steroids, the sports world seems to erupt? By now we should be more
stunned when discovering a successful player from the 1980s or ‘90s DIDN’T
use performance-enhancing drugs.
Recently, when a teary-eyed Mark McGwire publically admitted to making a
“mistake” by using steroids throughout his storied career, another
firestorm engulfed the media. Is he really contrite for his actions?
Should McGwire be voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame? Has he been
punished enough?
It seems to me that these are still the wrong questions. The image of a
sobbing player, asking for forgiveness after being caught cheating, then
moving on with life as if nothing happened but breaking a few rules sends
the wrong message to other players and our kids.
We should be asking the sport of baseball how it can better educate young
athletes about the serious dangers of steroid use. Maybe some athletes
think they can live with known side effects such as acne, baldness, bad
breath, yellow teeth, nervousness, and height loss. It may even be worth
it for some men to look forward to a future existence with shrunken
testicles and breast development.
Yet, it could literally be impossible to live with the increased
propensity for heart attacks and liver damage brought on by steroids.
These drugs can kill you.
Beyond the obvious physical changes, increased aggression and violence
are the least understood side effects of these drugs. The ‘roid rage
phenomenon is blamed by many for the disproportionately large number of
body- builders accused of murder compared to other athletes.
’Roid rage may also help explain the reaction of McGwire’s former
teammate, Jose Canseco, the day after McGwire’s recent confession. Though
McGwire admitted to using steroids, he denied Canseco’s allegations about
him. Canseco wrote a book in 2005 about baseball and steroid use, claiming
that he introduced many baseball players to the drugs, including McGwire,
and injected him with drugs in bathroom stalls before games.
If there was ever an example of why steroids should be avoided at all
costs, Canseco’s juvenile actions should qualify him as the poster-boy.
After McGwire’s confession, Canseco exclaimed, “I can’t believe he called
me a liar.”
“I even polygraphed that I injected him, and I passed it completely. So I
want to challenge him on national TV to a polygraph examination. I want to
see him call me a liar under a polygraph examination.” Canseco was
scheduled to appear on “Larry King Live” that night, but said he had to
cancel due to the emotional stress that McGwire’s interview had caused
him.
Between McGwire’s sobbing confession and Canseco’s apparent emotional
meltdown, we are left wondering if the former “Bash Brothers” (as they
were know in their heyday) of the mighty Oakland A’s are still on
steroids. They have been reduced to the Bawling Brothers – a couple of
weepy drama queens only concerned about proving the other to be the bigger
liar.
If Major League Baseball was really serious about waging war on steroids
in sports it would strictly enforce the rules now in place and bar
admitted steroid users such as Mark McGwire from the sport effective
immediately. No playing or coaching, no Hall-of-Fame eligibility, no
attending games, no autograph signings, no connection with the game in any
way - unless the drug-abusing players paid a penance.
Their punishment would be to convincingly lecture youth groups over a year
on the dangers of steroid use. That way it might sink in for all of us
that using performance-enhancing drugs is far worse than making a simple
mistake.

 
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