Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Michigan: A fading leader/Does...
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Michigan: A fading leader/Does area have high rate of removal of kids from moms?

Anne Stanton - January 25th, 2010
Michigan: a Fading Leader
By Anne Stanton
Michigan was once a leader for keeping kids with their families by
providing intensive support services to families like parenting classes
and job skill training, said child protection advocate Richard Wexler.
“In the mid 1990s, Michigan was still a leader, Illinois was a disaster.
But then Illinois looked at Michigan’s innovations and made them work,”
Wexler said.
But then Michigan’s commitment to prevention and working with families
diminished and so did the dollars. Secondly, the Binsfeld laws were passed
in 1996 to unclog the courts and to give permanency to children left
hanging in foster care. If parents couldn’t prove they could care for
their children within a year, they lost them forever. But the law
effectively funneled thousands more kids into foster care with no hope of
adoption. In 1994, there were 2,972 legal orphans or state wards. In 2006,
there were 6,292, according to Michigan DHS statistics.
“Michigan now has twice as many legal orphans—kids whose parents rights
have been terminated but who have little realistic hope of being adopted
because of their age, behavior or medical problems, or because they are
part of large sibling groups that ideally would be adopted together,”
wrote 28th Circuit Judge Kenneth Tacoma in a scathing critique, The
Unintended Consequences of the Binsfeld Law.
Tacoma and others have fought successfully for reform—particularly,
allowing relatives to receive benefits for taking in children, which
allows the kids and parents to stay connected.
But for every step forward is a step backward. In 2006, Michigan first
accepted, and then spurned a waiver that would have allowed DHS to use up
to $100 million in foster care funding alternatives.
This month, the Family Group Decision Making Program was cut, a program
that worked with troubled families and kids. The program was piloted in
Northern Michigan and served nearly 370 families. It also helped kids who
were aging out of the foster care system to navigate college, jobs, and
car buying.
The cut will save the state $800,000 this year, and $2.5 million next
year. But former area DHS Director Mary Marois said it will cost us in the
long run.
“Do you think Michigan is thinking about the long run? We’ve got to get
through this year … Nobody is looking at what this is going to cost us
five to ten years from now. We’ve already dumped prevention; what else is
there to cut?”


Does Area Have High Rate of
Removal of Kids from Homes?

By Anne Stanton

Grand Traverse County had the third highest removal rate of children in
the state of Michigan in 2008, according to a report by the National
Coalition for Child Protection Reform (NCCPR).
Dawn McLaughlin, who now heads DHS for Grand Traverse and Leelanau
counties, questioned those figures.
“I don’t think it’s true. I don’t think the statistics are accurate.
…We’re a dual county agency and we get combined with Leelanau County. Our
stats internally don’t reflect what they’re saying, and the court
statistics don’t reflect it. Anybody can take a statistic and come to a
conclusion, and it doesn’t make it true.”
Richard Wexler, head of the NCCPR countered that McLaughlin’s statements
are “misleading.” His data are lifted directly from DHS statistics and the
United States Census Bureau.
“When we calculated the numbers, Leelanau made almost no difference
because it’s so small. That’s why I didn’t include it among the ranked
counties,” Wexler said. “But just to humor Ms. McLaughlin I combined the
two counties and recalculated the figures.  When you do that, the rate of
removal does drop - slightly, from 39.2 to 34.1, and the ranking for the
combined region goes from third worst to merely fifth worst.”
But why calculate rate of removal using the number of poor children,
rather than the number of total children in the county?
Responded Wexler: “We could have simply compared the number of children
removed to a county’s total child population. But then all the counties
with high rates-of-removal and high child poverty rates would complain
that this was unfair because we didn’t consider the single largest risk
factor for actual abuse, not to mention the factor most often confused
with neglect —poverty. So, in order to factor that out, and come closer to
an apples-to-apples comparison, we compare removals to the number of
impoverished children in each county.”
The report shows that wealthier Grand Traverse County has three and a half
times the removal rate of Wayne County, a much poorer county—a strong
indication DHS is mistaking poverty for neglect, he said.
Mary Marois, former area DHS Director, hypothesizes the high numbers owe,
in part, to Munson Medical Center being a regional hospital. “All infants
born with drug addictions or children who are suspected of being abused
are run through Grand Traverse County for investigation and then turned
over to the county of residence.  This could affect the numbers,” she
said.
Wexler didn’t agree, saying the termination of parental rights and removal
take place in a parent’s county of residence.




 
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