Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The dark side of Mike Stanley
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The dark side of Mike Stanley

Erin Cowell - January 25th, 2010
The Dark Side of Mike Stanley
By Erin Crowell
Stand-up comic Mike Stanley is a lot like the venue he’ll be performing at this weekend: dark and off-the-wall. The Detroit native and Last Comic Still Standing 2005 winner will be performing at InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City, Jan. 29 & 30.
“I love that place,” Stanley says of InsideOut. “I love the art, how the place is set up. I really dig that place.”
It’s a location that suits Stanley’s style of comedy.
“Somebody once did a review and called me dark and hilarious,” he says. “That’s probably the best way to sum it up.”
So, what exactly is dark comedy?
“I want to push you somewhere you don’t want to go. Then, I want to make you laugh about it,” he says. “People are just so serious about things, it’s ridiculous.”
It will be a return trip for the guy whose style of comedy has been called “high energy” and “fearless.” He’s proven to be an audience favorite as he was recently voted Best Comedian in Chicago – his now homebase on a busy touring schedule.
“I started in the Detroit area and it was always a pain in the ass to drive out of Michigan—it’s a peninsula—just to go to tour out of Chicago.”

FIRST STANDUP
Stanley says he grew up watching standup.
“I’ve always been a huge fan ever since I was a kid. I’d watch everything from Cosby to Carlin. As a kid, when you see someone like Gallagher you think it’s the funniest damn thing in the world.
“I did my first stand-up when I was in seventh grade. It was a talent show. I thought it was really bad, but I won third place. I didn’t know how to go about being a stand-up comic. I thought you had to be from Hollywood or something.”
As he got older, Stanley observed other comics at local open mic nights.
“I started watching people. They thought no matter what, if they have a microphone in their hand they thought people would laugh.”
He started out slow, but eventually Stanley got better, turning five minute stand-ups into 50. Bill Bushart, another comic at Joey’s Comedy Club in Livonia, asked Stanley if he’d be interested in touring with him.
“I went from the opening act to the guy headlining,” Stanley says.
Stanley has been touring relentlessly for the past five years, landing gigs all over the Midwest, including return bookings at the Chicago Improv.
“I’m pretty much booked solid through July.”

RADIO HOST
When he’s not touring, Stanley is co-host of the popular podcast Red Bar Radio, which in early 2009 earned number one on Podcast Alley, an online directory for thousands of podcasts, and is still currently holding in the top 10 list.
He also just signed a deal with Stand Up! Records and just finished shooting for his hour-long DVD, “Tough Luck, Chump!”, and has his documentary “Salty Language, Peppered Morals” (about the Boston Comedy Festival) available through Red Bar Radio.
Whew!
So, what’s a guy with all these projects doing, coming to a small town like Traverse City?
“I really like the little beach towns,” he says. “Sometimes it doesn’t matter how big the crowd is, as long as the people are into the show.”
Having a good time is a two-way street for Stanley.
“(Onstage) is probably the most comfortable place I feel, other than being in the shower.”
See why Mike Stanley is one of the funniest guys onstage, when he performs January 29 & 30 at the InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City, located at 211 Garland Street in the Warehouse District. Both shows start at 8 p.m. Admission is $10. Visit insideoutgallery.com or check out Stanley’s podcast at
redbarradio.com.


 
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