Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · When the law goes nuts
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When the law goes nuts

Robert Downes - March 8th, 2010
In the spring of 2005, undercover officers from the Flint Area
Narcotics Group raided a dance club called the Club What’s Next and
rounded up 117 young men and women under the pretense that they were
“frequenting a drug house.”
Although the majority of college-aged patrons at the dance club had
done nothing illegal, some undercover cops had purchased drugs from a
few individuals, casting the light of suspicion on everyone.
Jennifer Thompson was one of the many patrons who were handcuffed,
strip searched, cavity searched and falsely arrested. Women were taken
into a restroom and told to remove their blouses and bras within sight
of male officers. One male officer commented on the size of a young
woman’s breasts, asking if they were real.
The winter issue of the ACLU Rights Review newspaper goes on in this
vein: “Most of the men were taken into a men’s bathroom and told to
raise their shirts, drop their pants and underwear, and to bend over
and cough. Some were told to put a finger into their anus. Those who
were still handcuffed had their pants and underwear pulled down to
around their knees by police officers. One man was stripped on the
side of the road after he had left the club.”
The upshot of this unconstitutional strip- and body cavity search was
a class action lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union.
The ACLU settled the case in December, forcing the police department
to institute new policies and training to prevent unlawful searches to
ever occur again. Flint and Genesee County must also pay victims of
the incident a total of $900,000.
But suppose it was you? Just minding your own business, wrapping up
the night at a dance club in Petoskey or TC? Who would you call?
It’s popular in America to heap scorn on the ACLU and its
“card-carrying members.” The stereotype of the American Civil
Liberties Union is that it’s made up of liberal crackpot lawyers who
spend much of their time driving around looking for Nativity scenes to
shut down at Christmas.
But those who’ve been victims of the powers-that-be know that those
stereotypes are wrong.
“Though the ACLU has always been viewed as powerful, few people know
that just a handful of brave and outspoken
activists around the state of Michigan are responsible for the
organization...” notes the
Rights Review.
Here are some of the cases that Michigan’s ACLU has been involved in recently:

• Ending naked detention in the Saginaw County Jail. Shades of Abu
Ghraib: from 1999 to 2005 the jail had a policy of stripping inmates
naked and forcing them to remain in a cell called “the hole,” where
they could be viewed by jail personnel and inmates of the opposite
“If the prisoner declined to strip, guards forcibly removed the
clothing, often by spraying chemicals in their faces, forcing them on
the ground and cutting off their clothing.”
Multiple lawsuits resulted in an end to this practice, along with
Saginaw County paying $1.5 million for “Callously disregarding the
basic human dignity of individuals awaiting trial.”

• No crime being homeless: In Ann Arbor, a number of homeless people
live on public land near a highway. Caleb Poirier is one of them --
he was arrested and charged with trespassing. The ACLU filed a brief,
“arguing that it is unconstitutional to arrest a person for sleeping
on public land when there is no place else for him to sleep.” The
prosecutor dropped the charges.

• Illegal home entries in Leelanau County: Last October, the local
ACLU demanded that police officers put an end to the practice of
“entering homes without warrants and forcing college-age students to
submit to breathalyzer tests.”
In one incident, police entered a Leelanau County home illegally,
walked into a woman’s bedroom at 3:30 a.m., woke her up, and forced
her to take a breathalyzer test.

• A terrorist? Daniel
Allen of Macomb County bit a neighbor during a fight and wound up
being charged as a terrorist because he’s HIV-positive. The ACLU is
preparing a brief, arguing that this is not how Michigan’s statute on
terrorism is intended to be used.

• Unjustly labelled a sex offender: In a case also reported by
Northern Express, a young man had sex with his girlfriend (now his
wife) when he was 18. A teacher reported the relationship to police,
and although criminal charges were dismissed, he was required to
register for life as a sex offender. In November, an appeals court
agreed with the ACLU that this constituted cruel and unusual
punishment, and took him off the list.

These are among the many other News of the Weird-style incidents that
the ACLU is involved with in Michigan. Who knows? Perhaps someday
they’ll even throw you a line when no one else will help or listen.
Check them out at www.aclumich.org. Like me, you may even decide to
become a “card-carrying member.”

A Threat to Your Right to Know

Currently, six bills are being considered in the State House of
Representatives which would allow Michigan communities to post legal
notices on websites, rather than in local newspapers.
The bills would allow legal notices to be listed on one of the following:
• the municipality’s website.
• the website of the local newspaper.
• on the local public TV channel.
This issue has got the Michigan Press Association and its member
newspapers in an uproar over the public’s “right to know” (not to
mention lost revenues from legal notices).
We receive few, if any, legal notices at Northern Express and have
no vested interest in this matter, but one could argue that the
Internet is too diffuse a medium to trust with legal notices.
By its nature, the Internet encourages people to flit from
site-to-site on a moment’s notice, seldom spending much time in any
one “place.” And it’s also crowded out there, with millions of
websites competing for your attention.
Thus, it would be all too easy for the general public to miss legal
notices -- even those inveterate city government watchers who are
inclined to search out such things.
Better to keep them in the local “newspaper of record,” where they
are sure to be seen by someone, if only your pet parakeet...

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