Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dance of India
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Dance of India

Erin Cowell - March 15th, 2010
The Dance of India:Nrityagram brings ancient Asia to the Dennos Museum Center
By Erin Crowell
Many professional dancers center their lives around their craft; but
it’s nothing compared to the complete dedication of the Nrityagram
dancers – the international dance ensemble from Southern India that
performs some of the most ancient and classical dance forms of the
region.
The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble will bring its holistic performance to the
Dennos Museum Center, in Traverse City, on March 20.
The idea behind the Nrityagram program is to provide its students with
a complete understanding of the philosophy that a good dancer is
second only to being a good human being. It’s an idea rooted in the
Gurukul Tradition, that students are provided everything from their
Guru—which, for the Nrityagram dancers, includes teachings in Indian
literature, mythology, poetry, music aesthetics and spiritual dance
theory—and, in turn, the students provide care to their Guru through
basic labor.

A WAY OF LIFE
In other words, the Nrityagram dancers are fully dedicated to their
craft, and the dance institute (being their guru), is totally
dedicated to their development.
“At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life, a matter of faith and belief,
nurtured and enriched by the souls of its’ own people,” said Protima
Gauri, founder.
Audiences can expect to see several dance variations, including:
Odissi, the oldest form of Indian dance; the sensuous and feminine
Mohiniattam,; Kathak, the tradition of story telling; Kathakali, a
religious dance-drama; and Manipuri, a martial arts type repertoire.
The New York Times called the ensemble, “One of the most luminous
dance events of the year…they performed with a burnished grace, a
selfless concentration and a depth that reflected their intensive
training in dance, music, literature, language and philosophy.”
Don’t miss your opportunity to see this performance, held Saturday,
March 20, in Milliken Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25
in advance; and $28 at the door. Visit dennosmuseum.org or call the
box office at 995-1553.

Photographing India
Further your Indian education with the exhibit “Larry K. Snider:
Photographing India,” held Sunday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Snider, a
photographer who has traveled the world for 30 years, focuses on the
city of Varanasi, which is situated on the west bank of the Ganga
River – and is considered the most sacred of India’s seven holy
cities. See images that document the people and landscape of this
particular region.
The cost to attend is regular museum admission ($6 for adults; and $4
for children). Visit dennosmuseum.org for more information.

Also of note: Ron Somers, president of the U.S.-India Business Council
will present “Game Changers: India’s First Decade of the 21st Century”
in Milliken Auditorium, on March 18. The presentation is part of the
International Affairs Forum, a monthly program featuring experts in
the areas of politics, media and other affairs. Program starts at 6
p.m. Tickets, $10. Call 231-995-1027.
 
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