Letters

Letters 03-30-2015

Bigotry Determined Webster’s New World Dictionary defines “bigot” as “a person who holds blindly and intolerantly to a particular creed, opinion, etc.” and “bigotry” as “the behavior, attitude, or beliefs of a bigot.”

Police State Thomas Kachadurian’s column might get the facts right but misses the story.

Oppose The Shell Game Is this a Shell Game? As a Democrat, I support increased taxes on motor fuels and vehicles to provide funding for our transportation infrastructure.

Sugars On The Way Senator Patrick Colbeck from Canton introduced a bill and the Senate passed it allowing schools and Girl & Boy Scout troops to have up to 3 bake sales per week.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dance of India
. . . .

Dance of India

Erin Cowell - March 15th, 2010
The Dance of India:Nrityagram brings ancient Asia to the Dennos Museum Center
By Erin Crowell
Many professional dancers center their lives around their craft; but
it’s nothing compared to the complete dedication of the Nrityagram
dancers – the international dance ensemble from Southern India that
performs some of the most ancient and classical dance forms of the
region.
The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble will bring its holistic performance to the
Dennos Museum Center, in Traverse City, on March 20.
The idea behind the Nrityagram program is to provide its students with
a complete understanding of the philosophy that a good dancer is
second only to being a good human being. It’s an idea rooted in the
Gurukul Tradition, that students are provided everything from their
Guru—which, for the Nrityagram dancers, includes teachings in Indian
literature, mythology, poetry, music aesthetics and spiritual dance
theory—and, in turn, the students provide care to their Guru through
basic labor.

A WAY OF LIFE
In other words, the Nrityagram dancers are fully dedicated to their
craft, and the dance institute (being their guru), is totally
dedicated to their development.
“At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life, a matter of faith and belief,
nurtured and enriched by the souls of its’ own people,” said Protima
Gauri, founder.
Audiences can expect to see several dance variations, including:
Odissi, the oldest form of Indian dance; the sensuous and feminine
Mohiniattam,; Kathak, the tradition of story telling; Kathakali, a
religious dance-drama; and Manipuri, a martial arts type repertoire.
The New York Times called the ensemble, “One of the most luminous
dance events of the year…they performed with a burnished grace, a
selfless concentration and a depth that reflected their intensive
training in dance, music, literature, language and philosophy.”
Don’t miss your opportunity to see this performance, held Saturday,
March 20, in Milliken Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25
in advance; and $28 at the door. Visit dennosmuseum.org or call the
box office at 995-1553.

Photographing India
Further your Indian education with the exhibit “Larry K. Snider:
Photographing India,” held Sunday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Snider, a
photographer who has traveled the world for 30 years, focuses on the
city of Varanasi, which is situated on the west bank of the Ganga
River – and is considered the most sacred of India’s seven holy
cities. See images that document the people and landscape of this
particular region.
The cost to attend is regular museum admission ($6 for adults; and $4
for children). Visit dennosmuseum.org for more information.

Also of note: Ron Somers, president of the U.S.-India Business Council
will present “Game Changers: India’s First Decade of the 21st Century”
in Milliken Auditorium, on March 18. The presentation is part of the
International Affairs Forum, a monthly program featuring experts in
the areas of politics, media and other affairs. Program starts at 6
p.m. Tickets, $10. Call 231-995-1027.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close