Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dance of India
. . . .

Dance of India

Erin Cowell - March 15th, 2010
The Dance of India:Nrityagram brings ancient Asia to the Dennos Museum Center
By Erin Crowell
Many professional dancers center their lives around their craft; but
it’s nothing compared to the complete dedication of the Nrityagram
dancers – the international dance ensemble from Southern India that
performs some of the most ancient and classical dance forms of the
region.
The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble will bring its holistic performance to the
Dennos Museum Center, in Traverse City, on March 20.
The idea behind the Nrityagram program is to provide its students with
a complete understanding of the philosophy that a good dancer is
second only to being a good human being. It’s an idea rooted in the
Gurukul Tradition, that students are provided everything from their
Guru—which, for the Nrityagram dancers, includes teachings in Indian
literature, mythology, poetry, music aesthetics and spiritual dance
theory—and, in turn, the students provide care to their Guru through
basic labor.

A WAY OF LIFE
In other words, the Nrityagram dancers are fully dedicated to their
craft, and the dance institute (being their guru), is totally
dedicated to their development.
“At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life, a matter of faith and belief,
nurtured and enriched by the souls of its’ own people,” said Protima
Gauri, founder.
Audiences can expect to see several dance variations, including:
Odissi, the oldest form of Indian dance; the sensuous and feminine
Mohiniattam,; Kathak, the tradition of story telling; Kathakali, a
religious dance-drama; and Manipuri, a martial arts type repertoire.
The New York Times called the ensemble, “One of the most luminous
dance events of the year…they performed with a burnished grace, a
selfless concentration and a depth that reflected their intensive
training in dance, music, literature, language and philosophy.”
Don’t miss your opportunity to see this performance, held Saturday,
March 20, in Milliken Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25
in advance; and $28 at the door. Visit dennosmuseum.org or call the
box office at 995-1553.

Photographing India
Further your Indian education with the exhibit “Larry K. Snider:
Photographing India,” held Sunday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Snider, a
photographer who has traveled the world for 30 years, focuses on the
city of Varanasi, which is situated on the west bank of the Ganga
River – and is considered the most sacred of India’s seven holy
cities. See images that document the people and landscape of this
particular region.
The cost to attend is regular museum admission ($6 for adults; and $4
for children). Visit dennosmuseum.org for more information.

Also of note: Ron Somers, president of the U.S.-India Business Council
will present “Game Changers: India’s First Decade of the 21st Century”
in Milliken Auditorium, on March 18. The presentation is part of the
International Affairs Forum, a monthly program featuring experts in
the areas of politics, media and other affairs. Program starts at 6
p.m. Tickets, $10. Call 231-995-1027.
 
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