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Letters 09-29-2014

Benishek Doesn’t Understand

Congressman Benishek claims to understand the needs of families, yet he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would cause about 10 million people to lose their health insurance. He must think as long as families can hold fundraisers they don’t need insurance...

(Un)Truth In Advertising

Constant political candidate ads on TV are getting to be too much to bear 45 days before the election...

Rare Tuttle Rebuttal

Finally, I disagree with Stephen Tuttle. His “Cherry Bomb” column in the 8/4/14 issue totally dismayed me. I always love his wit and the slamming of the 1 percent. His use of fact and hyperbole highlights the truth; until “Cherry Bomb.” Oh man, Stephen...

Say No To Fluoride

Do you or your child’s teeth have white, yellow, orange, brown, stains, spots, streaks, cloudy splotches or pitting? If so, you may be among millions of Americans who now have a condition called dental fluorosis...

Questions Of Freedom

The administration’s “Affordable Health Care Act” has ordered religious orders to provide contraception and chemical abortions against the church’s God given beliefs and teachings … an interesting order, considering the First Amendment’s clear prohibitions...

Stop The Insults & Talk

I found it interesting that Ms. Minervini used the Northern Express to push the Safe Harbor agenda for a 90-bed homeless shelter in Traverse City with a tactic that is also being utilized by members of the city commission. Those of us who oppose the project are being labeled as uncompassionate citizens...

Roads and Republicans

Each time you hit a road crater while driving, thank the “nerd” and the Tea Party controlled Republican legislature.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dance of India
. . . .

Dance of India

Erin Cowell - March 15th, 2010
The Dance of India:Nrityagram brings ancient Asia to the Dennos Museum Center
By Erin Crowell
Many professional dancers center their lives around their craft; but
it’s nothing compared to the complete dedication of the Nrityagram
dancers – the international dance ensemble from Southern India that
performs some of the most ancient and classical dance forms of the
region.
The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble will bring its holistic performance to the
Dennos Museum Center, in Traverse City, on March 20.
The idea behind the Nrityagram program is to provide its students with
a complete understanding of the philosophy that a good dancer is
second only to being a good human being. It’s an idea rooted in the
Gurukul Tradition, that students are provided everything from their
Guru—which, for the Nrityagram dancers, includes teachings in Indian
literature, mythology, poetry, music aesthetics and spiritual dance
theory—and, in turn, the students provide care to their Guru through
basic labor.

A WAY OF LIFE
In other words, the Nrityagram dancers are fully dedicated to their
craft, and the dance institute (being their guru), is totally
dedicated to their development.
“At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life, a matter of faith and belief,
nurtured and enriched by the souls of its’ own people,” said Protima
Gauri, founder.
Audiences can expect to see several dance variations, including:
Odissi, the oldest form of Indian dance; the sensuous and feminine
Mohiniattam,; Kathak, the tradition of story telling; Kathakali, a
religious dance-drama; and Manipuri, a martial arts type repertoire.
The New York Times called the ensemble, “One of the most luminous
dance events of the year…they performed with a burnished grace, a
selfless concentration and a depth that reflected their intensive
training in dance, music, literature, language and philosophy.”
Don’t miss your opportunity to see this performance, held Saturday,
March 20, in Milliken Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25
in advance; and $28 at the door. Visit dennosmuseum.org or call the
box office at 995-1553.

Photographing India
Further your Indian education with the exhibit “Larry K. Snider:
Photographing India,” held Sunday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Snider, a
photographer who has traveled the world for 30 years, focuses on the
city of Varanasi, which is situated on the west bank of the Ganga
River – and is considered the most sacred of India’s seven holy
cities. See images that document the people and landscape of this
particular region.
The cost to attend is regular museum admission ($6 for adults; and $4
for children). Visit dennosmuseum.org for more information.

Also of note: Ron Somers, president of the U.S.-India Business Council
will present “Game Changers: India’s First Decade of the 21st Century”
in Milliken Auditorium, on March 18. The presentation is part of the
International Affairs Forum, a monthly program featuring experts in
the areas of politics, media and other affairs. Program starts at 6
p.m. Tickets, $10. Call 231-995-1027.
 
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