Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Dance of India
. . . .

Dance of India

Erin Cowell - March 15th, 2010
The Dance of India:Nrityagram brings ancient Asia to the Dennos Museum Center
By Erin Crowell
Many professional dancers center their lives around their craft; but
it’s nothing compared to the complete dedication of the Nrityagram
dancers – the international dance ensemble from Southern India that
performs some of the most ancient and classical dance forms of the
region.
The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble will bring its holistic performance to the
Dennos Museum Center, in Traverse City, on March 20.
The idea behind the Nrityagram program is to provide its students with
a complete understanding of the philosophy that a good dancer is
second only to being a good human being. It’s an idea rooted in the
Gurukul Tradition, that students are provided everything from their
Guru—which, for the Nrityagram dancers, includes teachings in Indian
literature, mythology, poetry, music aesthetics and spiritual dance
theory—and, in turn, the students provide care to their Guru through
basic labor.

A WAY OF LIFE
In other words, the Nrityagram dancers are fully dedicated to their
craft, and the dance institute (being their guru), is totally
dedicated to their development.
“At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life, a matter of faith and belief,
nurtured and enriched by the souls of its’ own people,” said Protima
Gauri, founder.
Audiences can expect to see several dance variations, including:
Odissi, the oldest form of Indian dance; the sensuous and feminine
Mohiniattam,; Kathak, the tradition of story telling; Kathakali, a
religious dance-drama; and Manipuri, a martial arts type repertoire.
The New York Times called the ensemble, “One of the most luminous
dance events of the year…they performed with a burnished grace, a
selfless concentration and a depth that reflected their intensive
training in dance, music, literature, language and philosophy.”
Don’t miss your opportunity to see this performance, held Saturday,
March 20, in Milliken Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25
in advance; and $28 at the door. Visit dennosmuseum.org or call the
box office at 995-1553.

Photographing India
Further your Indian education with the exhibit “Larry K. Snider:
Photographing India,” held Sunday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Snider, a
photographer who has traveled the world for 30 years, focuses on the
city of Varanasi, which is situated on the west bank of the Ganga
River – and is considered the most sacred of India’s seven holy
cities. See images that document the people and landscape of this
particular region.
The cost to attend is regular museum admission ($6 for adults; and $4
for children). Visit dennosmuseum.org for more information.

Also of note: Ron Somers, president of the U.S.-India Business Council
will present “Game Changers: India’s First Decade of the 21st Century”
in Milliken Auditorium, on March 18. The presentation is part of the
International Affairs Forum, a monthly program featuring experts in
the areas of politics, media and other affairs. Program starts at 6
p.m. Tickets, $10. Call 231-995-1027.
 
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