Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Cars 100% ‘Made in...
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Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find

Robert Downes - March 15th, 2010
Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find
My wife and I got quite a shock while window shopping at a local
auto dealership the other day. Ideally, we’d like to buy a car that is
at least assembled in the United States, and one that gets good
mileage at a price in the low 20’s.
A salesman for one of the Big 3 auto dealers recommended a car that
fit the bill -- except for the fact that it’s assembled just across
the border in Mexico.
“But that’s no good if you want to buy a car that’s assembled in
America, is it?” I pointed out.
“Yes, but you have to remember,” he said, leaning in close and
lowering his voice in a confiding tone. “All of the money comes back
to the company in the U.S., and none of it goes to the UAW workers
making $65 an hour.”
I was flabbergasted. What hope is there for our country if even a
salesman for the Detroit automakers doesn’t care if his
fellow Americans have jobs?
I’m glad that Mexican autoworkers are making a good living
producing our cars, but still, charity begins at home.
It turns out, however, that few cars are now 100% “made in
America,” and it’s not always easy to track down home-grown wheels.
According to the Automobile Trade Policy Council, even
Michigan-based auto companies purchase many of their parts, engines
and transmissions from other countries. The group reports that the
U.S.-made parts content for GM and Ford is 73%, with 72% for Chrysler.
The remaining parts for those vehicles are built in countries such as
Mexico, Canada, Philippines and Japan.
On the other hand, even Japanese companies have a fairly high
content of American-made parts, along with many of their cars
assembled in the U.S. For instance, Toyota’s made-in-America content
is 48%; Honda’s is 59%, and Nissan’s is 45%. And of course, many cars
we think of as “imports” are actually assembled in the U.S. --
including various Honda, BMW and Subaru models.
So, perhaps like me, you own a car with a foreign footprint. When
it comes to your auto’s pedigree, things seem to be as uncertain as
the breed of a junkyard dog.
Here’s a little rundown on where our cars are built, courtesy of a
link in the Auto section of www.nytimes.com. You may think you’re
driving “Detroit iron,” when in fact your muscle car is built entirely
in Canada or Mexico...
Made in Michigan:
Chrysler Sebring -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Avenger -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Dakota - Warren
Dodge Ram - Warren
Dodge Viper - Warren
Jeep Commander - Detroit
Jeep Grand Cherokee - Detroit
Ford F-150 - Dearborn
Ford Focus - Wayne
Mustang - Flat Rock
Shelby GT500 - Flat Rock
Buick Lucerne -- Hamtramck
Cadillac CTS - Lansing
Saturn Outlook - Lansing
Buick Enclave - Lansing
GMC Acadia - Lansing
Cadillac DTS - Hamtramck
Cadillac STS - Lansing
Chevrolet Malibu - Orion Twp.
Pontiac G6 - Orion Twp.
Silverado - Pontiac & Flint
GMC Sierra - Pontiac & Flint

Made in Mexico:
Cadillac Escalade EXT
2010 Cadillac SRX
Chevrolet Avalanche
Chevrolet HHR
Chevrolet Silverado
Chrysler PT Cruiser
Dodge Journey
Dodge Ram (heavy-duty)
Ford Fusion and Fusion Hybrid
GMC Sierra Crew Cab
Honda CR-V
Lincoln MKZ
Mercury Milan and Milan Hybrid

Imports Assembled in US:
BMW - 2 models
Honda - 9 models
Hyundai - 2 models
Mazda - 4 models
Mercedes-Benz - 3 models
Mitsubishi - 5 models
Nissan - 9 models
Subaru - 3 models
Suzuki - 1 model
Toyota - 9 models

 
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