Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Cars 100% ‘Made in...
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Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find

Robert Downes - March 15th, 2010
Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find
My wife and I got quite a shock while window shopping at a local
auto dealership the other day. Ideally, we’d like to buy a car that is
at least assembled in the United States, and one that gets good
mileage at a price in the low 20’s.
A salesman for one of the Big 3 auto dealers recommended a car that
fit the bill -- except for the fact that it’s assembled just across
the border in Mexico.
“But that’s no good if you want to buy a car that’s assembled in
America, is it?” I pointed out.
“Yes, but you have to remember,” he said, leaning in close and
lowering his voice in a confiding tone. “All of the money comes back
to the company in the U.S., and none of it goes to the UAW workers
making $65 an hour.”
I was flabbergasted. What hope is there for our country if even a
salesman for the Detroit automakers doesn’t care if his
fellow Americans have jobs?
I’m glad that Mexican autoworkers are making a good living
producing our cars, but still, charity begins at home.
It turns out, however, that few cars are now 100% “made in
America,” and it’s not always easy to track down home-grown wheels.
According to the Automobile Trade Policy Council, even
Michigan-based auto companies purchase many of their parts, engines
and transmissions from other countries. The group reports that the
U.S.-made parts content for GM and Ford is 73%, with 72% for Chrysler.
The remaining parts for those vehicles are built in countries such as
Mexico, Canada, Philippines and Japan.
On the other hand, even Japanese companies have a fairly high
content of American-made parts, along with many of their cars
assembled in the U.S. For instance, Toyota’s made-in-America content
is 48%; Honda’s is 59%, and Nissan’s is 45%. And of course, many cars
we think of as “imports” are actually assembled in the U.S. --
including various Honda, BMW and Subaru models.
So, perhaps like me, you own a car with a foreign footprint. When
it comes to your auto’s pedigree, things seem to be as uncertain as
the breed of a junkyard dog.
Here’s a little rundown on where our cars are built, courtesy of a
link in the Auto section of www.nytimes.com. You may think you’re
driving “Detroit iron,” when in fact your muscle car is built entirely
in Canada or Mexico...
Made in Michigan:
Chrysler Sebring -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Avenger -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Dakota - Warren
Dodge Ram - Warren
Dodge Viper - Warren
Jeep Commander - Detroit
Jeep Grand Cherokee - Detroit
Ford F-150 - Dearborn
Ford Focus - Wayne
Mustang - Flat Rock
Shelby GT500 - Flat Rock
Buick Lucerne -- Hamtramck
Cadillac CTS - Lansing
Saturn Outlook - Lansing
Buick Enclave - Lansing
GMC Acadia - Lansing
Cadillac DTS - Hamtramck
Cadillac STS - Lansing
Chevrolet Malibu - Orion Twp.
Pontiac G6 - Orion Twp.
Silverado - Pontiac & Flint
GMC Sierra - Pontiac & Flint

Made in Mexico:
Cadillac Escalade EXT
2010 Cadillac SRX
Chevrolet Avalanche
Chevrolet HHR
Chevrolet Silverado
Chrysler PT Cruiser
Dodge Journey
Dodge Ram (heavy-duty)
Ford Fusion and Fusion Hybrid
GMC Sierra Crew Cab
Honda CR-V
Lincoln MKZ
Mercury Milan and Milan Hybrid

Imports Assembled in US:
BMW - 2 models
Honda - 9 models
Hyundai - 2 models
Mazda - 4 models
Mercedes-Benz - 3 models
Mitsubishi - 5 models
Nissan - 9 models
Subaru - 3 models
Suzuki - 1 model
Toyota - 9 models

 
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