Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Cars 100% ‘Made in...
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Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find

Robert Downes - March 15th, 2010
Cars 100% ‘Made in America‘ hard to find
My wife and I got quite a shock while window shopping at a local
auto dealership the other day. Ideally, we’d like to buy a car that is
at least assembled in the United States, and one that gets good
mileage at a price in the low 20’s.
A salesman for one of the Big 3 auto dealers recommended a car that
fit the bill -- except for the fact that it’s assembled just across
the border in Mexico.
“But that’s no good if you want to buy a car that’s assembled in
America, is it?” I pointed out.
“Yes, but you have to remember,” he said, leaning in close and
lowering his voice in a confiding tone. “All of the money comes back
to the company in the U.S., and none of it goes to the UAW workers
making $65 an hour.”
I was flabbergasted. What hope is there for our country if even a
salesman for the Detroit automakers doesn’t care if his
fellow Americans have jobs?
I’m glad that Mexican autoworkers are making a good living
producing our cars, but still, charity begins at home.
It turns out, however, that few cars are now 100% “made in
America,” and it’s not always easy to track down home-grown wheels.
According to the Automobile Trade Policy Council, even
Michigan-based auto companies purchase many of their parts, engines
and transmissions from other countries. The group reports that the
U.S.-made parts content for GM and Ford is 73%, with 72% for Chrysler.
The remaining parts for those vehicles are built in countries such as
Mexico, Canada, Philippines and Japan.
On the other hand, even Japanese companies have a fairly high
content of American-made parts, along with many of their cars
assembled in the U.S. For instance, Toyota’s made-in-America content
is 48%; Honda’s is 59%, and Nissan’s is 45%. And of course, many cars
we think of as “imports” are actually assembled in the U.S. --
including various Honda, BMW and Subaru models.
So, perhaps like me, you own a car with a foreign footprint. When
it comes to your auto’s pedigree, things seem to be as uncertain as
the breed of a junkyard dog.
Here’s a little rundown on where our cars are built, courtesy of a
link in the Auto section of www.nytimes.com. You may think you’re
driving “Detroit iron,” when in fact your muscle car is built entirely
in Canada or Mexico...
Made in Michigan:
Chrysler Sebring -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Avenger -- Sterling Hts
Dodge Dakota - Warren
Dodge Ram - Warren
Dodge Viper - Warren
Jeep Commander - Detroit
Jeep Grand Cherokee - Detroit
Ford F-150 - Dearborn
Ford Focus - Wayne
Mustang - Flat Rock
Shelby GT500 - Flat Rock
Buick Lucerne -- Hamtramck
Cadillac CTS - Lansing
Saturn Outlook - Lansing
Buick Enclave - Lansing
GMC Acadia - Lansing
Cadillac DTS - Hamtramck
Cadillac STS - Lansing
Chevrolet Malibu - Orion Twp.
Pontiac G6 - Orion Twp.
Silverado - Pontiac & Flint
GMC Sierra - Pontiac & Flint

Made in Mexico:
Cadillac Escalade EXT
2010 Cadillac SRX
Chevrolet Avalanche
Chevrolet HHR
Chevrolet Silverado
Chrysler PT Cruiser
Dodge Journey
Dodge Ram (heavy-duty)
Ford Fusion and Fusion Hybrid
GMC Sierra Crew Cab
Honda CR-V
Lincoln MKZ
Mercury Milan and Milan Hybrid

Imports Assembled in US:
BMW - 2 models
Honda - 9 models
Hyundai - 2 models
Mazda - 4 models
Mercedes-Benz - 3 models
Mitsubishi - 5 models
Nissan - 9 models
Subaru - 3 models
Suzuki - 1 model
Toyota - 9 models

 
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