Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Coal Consequences
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Coal Consequences

Anne Stanton - June 8th, 2009
Coal Consequences:
Will electric bills in rural areas double?

By Anne Stanton 6/8/09

A proposed coal-fired power plant in Rogers City would at least double the electric bill of 33,000 co-op members living in rural Northwest Michigan, and that’s without any new regulations or taxes, asserted an energy activist opposed to its construction.
Tom Karas will introduce a resolution at Cherryland Electric Cooperative’s annual membership meeting this Wednesday that asks co-op leadership to deliver an estimate of how much the proposed Rogers City plant will cost and its impact on customer bills.
Karas, director of Michigan Energy Alternatives, believes the plant will cost nearly triple what the company has been saying publicly. He adds that building the plant now makes no sense, given the state’s drop in demand for electricity predicted over the next 10 years.
He hopes that once co-op member-owners learn the real cost of this proposed plant, they will urge its leadership to reconsider construction. The power plant would be operated by Wolverine Power Cooperative, which provides electricity to six co-ops, including Cherryland Electric Cooperative.

SPECULATION?
Tony Anderson, general manager of Cherryland Electric Cooperative, countered that Karas’ estimate is “speculation.” (The estimate was prepared by Tom Sanzillo, former deputy comptroller of New York state at Karas’ request.)
Anderson, however, wasn’t ready to say how much the plant would increase customers’ bills.
“We are trying to get an air permit from the state DEQ. We are trying to keep our costs to a minimum. It makes no sense to do an in-depth analysis if we have no air permit. As we told [Karas] repeatedly, if we get the air permit, we’ll do an analysis.”
Wolverine Electric Cooperative has already billed co-op members $63 million for the plant’s future development. Of that, it’s spent $18 million.
“A cooperative is supposed to be for the members, but we have a situation in which they’re being kept in the dark about the potential costs,” Karas said. “To say that there is no estimate available after three years and $18 million, it seems to me, it’s no way to be running a business.”

WHY A NEW PLANT?
Wolverine is pursuing the coal plant because it owns no base-load generation, and its principal contract for base-load power will end at year-end in 2011, e-mailed Nancy Tanner, Wolverine’s director of communications and member relations.
“We are developing the plant to ensure our members have a reliable source of electricity at a competitive price, the very reason electric cooperatives were formed decades ago,” she wrote in her email.
Anderson said Wolverine is pursuing the coal-fired power plant in order to provide its members with the most affordable source of energy.
Karas said that if Wolverine needs to find more electricity, it could easily buy electricity from Consumer’s Energy and DTE Energy. Both companies predict excess capacity due to a downturn in demand of five-to-six percent over the next 10 years, according to the companies’ most recent filings with the Michigan Public Service Commission.
Additionally, Michigan is striving to become a leader in alternative sources of energy and is requiring companies to ramp up their source of alternative energy. It’s now delaying permits of traditional coal-fired power plants, one of the biggest sources of global warming.

THE ALTERNATIVES
Karas disputes that coal is the cheapest form of generating electricity and cites a 2008 report prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that says it costs more than four other alternatives, including wind, geo-thermal, natural gas and some concentrated solar.
That comparison doesn’t even include carbon capture or sequestration efforts, which make coal plants financially prohibitive, Karas said.
“Cherryland’s leadership just has to have a will to look harder for alternatives,” he said.
Karas said he calculated that the plant would actually cost $3.15 billion, using the figures that Wolverine provided to the state in a September 2007 permit application. Company officials have previously used a figure of $1.2 billion.
With the state suffering from record high unemployment and the bankruptcy of General Motors, Wolverine should pull the plug on the project—as 99 other companies have done across the country in the past few years, Karas said.
Anderson pointed out that in contrast to declining electrical demand statewide, Cherryland Electric saw a 1.5 percent increase in kilowatt hours used last year. That’s due to the fact that Cherryland services rural areas.
Anderson said that buying on the open market is an option, but it could potentially cost more.
Would it be wiser to wait to see how the economy shakes out before pursuing a new coal-fired power plant?
“That’s a decision we’ll make after the DEQ responds to our application for the air permit,” Anderson said. “We’ll do the financial analysis and we’ll make the best decision. Right now, we need options. We need affordable electricity in the future. We’re looking for options.”


Time to “talk dirty”

• Co-op Conversations.org is hosting Coal Night at the State Theatre on Monday, “Time to Talk Dirty,” on June 8, at 6 p.m. The evening will host a Robert Redford documentary, “Fighting Goliath: Texas Coal Wars.” Tom Sanzillo will also be on hand to talk about the “true cost” of coal plants.
• The public is invited to come to a question and answer forum with energy experts at the Hagerty Center, 715 E. Front Street, TC, at 3 p.m., on Monday.
• On June 10, members of Cherryland Electric Co-op members will meet at Wuerfel Ballpark at 4 p.m. Under the agenda item of new business, activist Tom Karas will propose a resolution that asks co-op leaders to reveal the impact of the proposed plant on electric bills.

 
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