Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · The King is dead... get...
. . . .

The King is dead... get used to it

Ross Boissoneau - July 6th, 2009
The King is Dead...
... get used to it
By Ross Boissoneau 7/6/09

And in a news flash, Michael Jackson is still dead. So is Anna Nicole Smith.
Yes, it is news that Jackson died so suddenly and mysteriously. But the complete meltdown of the tabloid press – and the not-tabloid press – is so over-the-top as to be ridiculous.
Not that Jackson would have minded. This type of overblown media coverage is something he helped create and fueled. Some, such as Detroit Free Press columnist Mitch Albom, have painted Jackson as a tragic figure alternately celebrated and vilified by our country’s celebrity-mad culture. Which is true enough, but conveniently ignores the culpability of those who feed into it. Such as Wacko Jacko or Anna Nicole Smith, or before them, Elvis.
At some point in time, whether they suffered abuse or overexposure, people have to take responsibility for their own lives and their own actions. By all accounts, Jackson never did. Instead, he holed up in Neverland, or Dubai, or someplace where he could be surrounded by his sycophants and apologists. Who can forget the images of him holding his child outstretched over a balcony, or standing atop a car waving to adoring fans while on trial for child molestation?
While he was found not guilty in that trial, his confession that, as an adult, he found it perfectly acceptable to sleep with children sent shudders through many, though apparently not all. Add to that his bizarre appearances in court, and of course his disfiguring himself through plastic surgery and bleaching agents until he was unrecognizable. For all the musical talent he displayed through his 20s and 30s, the Michael Jackson of the last 10-15 years has been a sideshow, a circus freak.
But you don‘t hear much of that from those bemoaning his sudden death. Instead, they focus on the Jackson of the ‘80s, when he ruled the charts with “Thriller” and “Bad,” or his earlier persona with his brothers, as a pre-teen belting out “I Want You Back” or “ABC.” Great tunes, obviously. And no doubt his music and videos were more responsible than those of any other artist for the integration of MTV.
But again, those showering him with such overpraise are missing the point. Biggest album ever? Yes. Greatest music icon ever? Ummm, well, one of them, maybe. Best or most important musical figure in history?Hardly.While his singing and dancing made him a star, he was far from the greatest at either. In fact, heard today, his vocal histrionics sound distressingly similar from record to record. I’ll take Marvin Gaye or Stevie Wonder, please.
And while he wrote many of his greatest hits, he didn’t play an instrument as does, say, Prince, or Steve Winwood, or Todd Rundgren – all of whom play guitar, bass, drums, and keyboards, write, produce and sing, and whose careers are still going strong and will eclipse Jackson’s in terms of longevity.
And if longevity is the greatest single marker of greatness, will Jackson’s music still be played in 20 or 30 or 50 years, like that of Gershwin or Duke Ellington or Count Basie? Or in 200 or 300 years, like that of Bach or Beethoven?
No, while Jackson was a man of his times, those times are 20 years in the rear view mirror. The sad, pathetic, scary person he became is gone now, and we should let him rest in peace.

Ross Boissoneau writes periodically about music for the Express.



 
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