Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Hard covers and hard cider
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Hard covers and hard cider

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - December 14th, 2009
Hardcovers & Hard Cider
Book sale brings female authors together
By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli
Hardcovers and Hard Cider don’t sound like two things that normally go together. But they’ll both be offered by local women writers when they gather to sell their books for holiday gift giving at the Mercato in the Village at the Grand Traverse Commons on Friday, December 18, from 4-9 p.m. Cider will be offered, along with the writers talking about their craft and sharing the holiday season.
“We’re serving up cider and good books because we want to promote books by local writers and begin a forum for women writers to come together, find an audience, and know each other,” said planners, writers Megan Raphael (The Courage Code) and Marsha Barber Clark (Ponder Picture Prosper: A Proven Method for Getting What You Want in Life, Love, and Work).
“The Dalai Llama recently said the world is being transformed by western women,” Raphael added. “And the publishing world is being transformed. We want to celebrate the kinds of work being created right here in Northern Michigan. What better gift is there to give but a book of northern recipes, an inspirational book by someone in our own community, northern tales based on true and fictional crime, a young adult set in Northern Michigan—so many books for all ages and interests?”
Talking about the special blessings of the north for artists, the women pointed to the beauty around them, the ability to tuck in and be quiet, and to the natural world. “But sometimes solitariness can feel like isolation,” Clark said. “Women writers don’t ask for help enough. We’re hoping to begin, with this event, to build bridges between all of us. We hope young and older writers will come to be a part of this. We want mothers to bring their daughters.”
Of writers, especially women writers, Clark writes in her book, “We are not taught to dream. We are usually taught to suppress our dreams with weighty tales by well-meaning family and friends of why our dreams will never come to fruition. They don’t want us to be disappointed if we don’t reach our goals. Instead, we are disappointed for never trying. We learn to put our dreams away and quietly accept the life of a pinball.”
No pinballs here, writers appearing at Hardcovers and Hard Cider will include:

Mary Ellen Geist, Measure of the Heart: Caring for a Parent with Alzheimers
Wendy Stout, On the Spin Cycle
Mardi Link, Isadore’s Secret
McKenzie Magee, Guide for Midlife: Navigating the Six Universal Crises
Pattie LaNoue Stearns,Cherry Home Companion cookbook, and Good Taste: A Guide to Northern Michigan Cuisine
Hillary Porter, Colors of Beech Hill
Megan Raphael, The Courage Code
Marsha Barber Clark, Ponder Picture Prosper

 
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