Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

Home · Articles · News · Features · Sara Caldwell
. . . .

Sara Caldwell

Anne Stanton - March 22nd, 2010
Sara Caldwell Pays It Forward The 30-year-old opens her home to deeply troubled teens
By Anne Stanton
While most single women in their 20s are playing the dating game and
exploring the night life, Sara Caldwell took a different route. She
welcomed her one-year-old cousin, Cory, into her home as a foster
child and kissed her social life good-bye.
Overnight, her life revolved around nursing the sick toddler back to
health. Hospitalized as a baby for pneumonia and asthma, he still
heavily wheezed at night. When breathing attacks threatened
suffocation, she’d rush him to the emergency room. She has two words
for that first year: sleep deprivation.
“My life became pretty limited. I went down to three days of work (she
worked as a nurse at Munson), and Cory and I stayed home. My sisters
would help out so I could get groceries because taking Cory out in
public was not an easy task. When he first came to me, oh my goodness,
he was so sick. His poor hair was scraggly, he was so malnourished. I
didn’t think that boy would ever have normal hair.”
Cory was sick, in part, because his birth parents had exposed him and
his brother to the truck exhaust by putting him in a second-hand car
seat strapped into a pick-up truck bed with a bungee cord. “It took a
nasty toll on their lungs,” Sara said.
Sara adopted Cory when he was 2 1/2, and has since adopted two
others—Raven, 7, and her half-brother Gabe, 3. She’s also the legal
guardian for Tosha, a 17-year-old from Elk Rapids.
Caldwell has decided to take another step. She will be one of the
first families to accept an assignment from a Child and Family
Services program called Treatment Foster Care. This program helps
adolescents, ages 12 to 17, who are on court-ordered probation or are
either on their way or returning from out-of-town residential care to
get help for emotional problems. This program gives them a chance to
stay in their hometown.
Fortunately, Caldwell, 30, now has a partner by her side. Two and a
half years ago, she married Alan Caldwell, her neighbor in Suttons
Bay (they have since moved to a tidy home in Cedar). A Grand Traverse
County Sheriff’s deputy, who has four adult children, Alan jokingly
calls himself Sara’s “backbone.”
The Treatment Foster Care program builds upon an existing program by
the same name. Under the old program, the foster teen would receive
additional visits from a treatment foster care social worker.
Now the troubled teen will move in with a specially trained foster
family from 90 days to twelve months, with a goal of returning home.
Each week, the teen will meet with all the people involved his or her
life—parents, treatment foster parents, relatives and friends, as
well as teachers, counselors, the probation officer, the treatment
foster care worker, and court personnel, said Joseph Sanok, foster
care supervisor.
The philosophy is that the teen accepts and takes control of their
life. When the teen hits certain goals, she or he is allowed to
return home.
“The child’s environment won’t magically change, so we want the
meetings to continue even after they return home,” Sanok said.
The program will accept referrals from Leelanau, Grand Traverse and
Mason counties. The foster family will receive a stipend about double
that of traditional foster care pay.
Treatment foster parents will receive 30 hours over twelve weeks of
specialized training that will instruct them on how to teach the teen
to replace negative with positive behaviors. Homes will also be
screened and licensed. The program, which has already recruited six
families, urgently needs six more families with the experience or
aptitude of caring for deeply troubled teens.
It might seem like an overwhelming challenge, but Sara and Alan said
their faith gives the family purpose and a sense of calm. They pray
together each morning, and the kids are often reminded of Bible
phrases, such as, “A soft answer turns away wrath.”
“I think, growing up, I knew this is what God wanted me to do. I feel
very, very blessed. You’re here for a reason. When you touch someone
else’s life, it touches your own life. You pay it forward.”
The Caldwells have a chore board, and the family stands by it. “We
emphasize ‘Team Caldwell,’” she said.
Even so, she doesn’t want to be seen as a “perfect family.”
There are fights, tantrums, and kids threatening to run away. One teen
girl, too troubled to cope, went to the hospital for psychiatric
treatment.
“We’ve taken in kids who fully expect that we’re perfect and get upset
when we mess up. I tell them, we are a real family and real families
aren’t perfect,” she said.
Sara and Al also expect their kids to act like real kids: “We once got
to Avalanche Bay, it was 8 p.m., and we had a snack at Pizza Hut.
Everything was set against us. The kids were tired; I knew anything
would make them explode. And nothing happened. I thought, ‘We can eat
in a restaurant! We’re getting there.’ You put your time in, and you
see results!”

Editor’s note: If you’re interested in becoming a treatment foster
care parent, please email Joseph Sanok at jsanok@cfsmail.org.

 
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