Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Lake Dubonnet

Mike Terrell - April 5th, 2010
Lake Dubonet offers a great pedal-paddle combo
By Mike Terrell
Last spring in early April it was one of those picture-perfect days for outdoor activities: warm and sunny. The only decision to be made was would I go mountain biking with my labs or opt for a paddle in my kayak minus the dogs.
Fortunately, there was a solution that would satisfy both – a trip to Lake Dubonet where I was able to ride the seven mile Lost Lake Pathway and paddle the scenic lake afterwards. Both my dogs and I were happy. The pathway runs by the boat launch and shaded parking area, which is located within the state campground. You bike and paddle from the same spot. What could be easier?
The Lost Lake Pathway has always been one of my favorite area trails for a nice, easy outing with great scenery. About a mile of the trail hugs the Lake Dubonet shoreline, and the remaining six miles of pathway meander through a landscape of transitional sinkholes created by glacial debris and melting ice deposits. It’s typical of how the glaciers helped form our regional topography.
The trail passes a couple of large blueberry bogs along the back part as it goes around the Lost Lake basin. They were, at one time, completely covered by the small lake remaining at the north end of the basin. In just a couple of centuries the water will probably completely disappear, which is the fate of small pit lakes that were created by the last glacier passing through here 10,000 some years ago. It’s hung on for quite a while.

RAILWAY BEDS
At times the trail follows old railroad beds created during the logging era, a little over a century ago. Some of the beautiful red pine stands that you pass through are at least that old. They somehow managed to escape the logger’s ax.
At one point, the pathway had interpretive markers placed along the trail explaining the history, topography and nature of the area, but most are now long gone. Unfortunately, the DNR in cost-cutting moves never replaced them, but maps and post markers do still exist at most trail intersections. The well-worn pathway is fairly easy to follow, but you do have to pay attention. Forest roads and other trails do pass through the area.
The Shore-to-Shore horseback trail also passes through here crisscrossing the Lost Lake Pathway at least a couple of times. Luckily, horses weren’t have been on the hiking trail. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. The DNR needs to put up “no horse trail” signs at all the intersections. Horses are not permitted on the hiking/biking trail, but no signs detail this, and they sometimes stray onto the trail.
The earthen dam you cross a couple of times during the ride was created in 1956, forming Lake Dubonet. The stream flowing away from the dam is the formation of the Platte River. Prior to the dam there used to be two small lakes – Big Mud and Little Mud Lakes – that formed into one large lake when the dam was erected.

FISHING TOO
The lake is fun to explore by kayak or canoe. It was created to improve waterfowl and fishing habitat, which has proven to be successful. Dubonet is one of the best pan fishing lakes in the region. The north end of the lake, covered with old “ghost” forests, offers some interesting paddling as you work your way through the silent, gray trunks and small islands created by the flooding. There’s even a floating island.
A pair of loons has nested here for years and you can often hear their eerie call echoing across the lake in late afternoon. That wild call and mostly undeveloped shoreline could almost make you think you’re on a lake in the Canadian wilderness.
You’re not, but it’s a nice touch so close to Traverse City and Interlochen. Once you leave the campground on the hiking/mountain biking trails you won’t see any signs of development.

 
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