Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Grinding the rails
. . . .

Grinding the rails

Erin Crowell - April 5th, 2010
Grinding the Rails at North Coast Freeride
By Erin Crowell
Several months ago, Levi Kyser took his mountain bike to Ray’s
Mountain Bike Park, an indoor skate and bike park in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It was an inspirational trip for the Traverse City native, who has
traveled to places such as New Jersey, West Virginia and New York as a
semi-professional downhill mountain biker.
“I came home and wanted somewhere indoors to ride, so I built some
small ramps in my basement and it snowballed into this place,” says
Kyser.
The place is North Coast Freeride, an indoor bike and skate park in
Traverse City. Kyser, along with brother Jesse, opened the venue in
January.
“We see all the kids down at the public park and the way things go.
There’s no supervision,” said Jesse. “Some parents don’t want to drop
off their kids. We figured there was a market for it.”
The brothers say supervision and safety is the number one reason why
they believe the indoor park is a valuable asset to the “riding”
community.
That, and weather.
“We get a lot of rain and snowy weather,” said Levi.

THE PLAYGROUND
North Coast consists of a 7500 square foot riding area, complete with
rails, box jumps, wall rides, half pipes, street section and foam pit.
The foam pit – which measures 16’ by 16’ and is five feet deep –
allows riders to practice tricks, allowing them to concentrate on
moves and not, so much, the landing.
“You practice your tricks in the foam and then go to the box jump,”
said Jesse. “We didn’t spend hardly any money on the pit. It’s all
recycled material from upholstery shops and manufacturing places. We
only paid about $100 for the wood.
North Coast’s capacity holds up to 20 spectators and up to 40 people
in the actual park. The facility also offers private birthday parties.
“We have a ping pong table and music streaming. It’s a good
atmosphere,” said Jesse. “We get a lot of teens, anywhere from 10 to
25 years old, and even younger kids.”
As far as skill level goes, the brothers say it ranges from
professional and sponsored riders to the just-starting-out.

ERASING THE STEREOTYPE
“The skill level varies, but everyone is really positive,” said Jesse.
“Our place is a little more friendly for a beginner, being people pay
to be here. There’s always somebody watching over the park. Even the
older guys are a little more courteous to the younger guys,” said
Levi. “We really are pushing a family-friendly atmosphere. We want
everyone to feel welcome and comfortable.
When it comes to the stereotype of young skateboarders and bikers
being “bad” or “rude,” the brothers say you’ll only see good people at
their park.
“They take care of you when you fall down. When someone does a good
trick, people are yelling and cheering,” said Jesse. “You can see them
as a misfit crowd, but they take care of themselves and each other.”

North Coast Freeride is located at 887 Lynch Drive in Traverse City,
just south of Cherry Capital Airport. Hours are Monday through
Thursday, 2 p.m.-9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; and
Sunday, noon-9 p.m. For rules, rates and information on booking a
party, call 231-929-4962 or check out their page on Facebook.

 
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