Letters

Letters 05-23-2016

Examine The Priorities Are you disgusted about closing schools, crumbling roads and bridges, and cuts everywhere? Investigate funding priorities of legislators. In 1985 at the request of President Reagan, Grover Norquist founded Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). For 30 years Norquist asked every federal and state candidate and incumbent to sign the pledge to vote against any increase in taxes. The cost of living has risen significantly since 1985; think houses, cars, health care, college, etc...

Make TC A Community For Children Let’s be that town that invests in children actively getting themselves to school in all of our neighborhoods. Let’s be that town that supports active, healthy, ready-to-learn children in all of our neighborhoods...

Where Are Real Christian Politicians? As a practicing Christian, I was very disappointed with the Rev. Dr. William C. Myers statements concerning the current presidential primaries (May 8). Instead of using the opportunity to share the message of Christ, he focused on Old Testament prophecies. Christ gave us a new commandment: to love one another...

Not A Great Plant Pick As outreach specialist for the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network and a citizen concerned about the health of our region’s natural areas, I was disappointed by the recent “Listen to the Local Experts” feature. When asked for their “best native plant pick,” three of the four garden centers referenced non-native plants including myrtle, which is incredibly invasive...

Truth About Plants Your feature, “listen to the local experts” contains an error that is not helpful for the birds and butterflies that try to live in northwest Michigan. Myrtle is not a native plant. The plant is also known as vinca and periwinkle...

Ask the Real Plant Experts This letter is written to express my serious concern about a recent “Listen To Your Local Experts” article where local nurseries suggested their favorite native plant. Three of the four suggested non-native plants and one suggested is an invasive and cause of serious damage to Michigan native plants in the woods. The article is both sad and alarming...

My Plant Picks In last week’s featured article “Listen to the Local Experts,” I was shocked at the responses from the local “experts” to the question about best native plant pick. Of the four “experts” two were completely wrong and one acknowledged that their pick, gingko tree, was from East Asia, only one responded with an excellent native plant, the serviceberry tree...

NOTE: Thank you to TC-based Eagle Eye Drone Service for the cover photo, taken high over Sixth Street in Traverse City.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Grinding the rails
. . . .

Grinding the rails

Erin Crowell - April 5th, 2010
Grinding the Rails at North Coast Freeride
By Erin Crowell
Several months ago, Levi Kyser took his mountain bike to Ray’s
Mountain Bike Park, an indoor skate and bike park in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It was an inspirational trip for the Traverse City native, who has
traveled to places such as New Jersey, West Virginia and New York as a
semi-professional downhill mountain biker.
“I came home and wanted somewhere indoors to ride, so I built some
small ramps in my basement and it snowballed into this place,” says
Kyser.
The place is North Coast Freeride, an indoor bike and skate park in
Traverse City. Kyser, along with brother Jesse, opened the venue in
January.
“We see all the kids down at the public park and the way things go.
There’s no supervision,” said Jesse. “Some parents don’t want to drop
off their kids. We figured there was a market for it.”
The brothers say supervision and safety is the number one reason why
they believe the indoor park is a valuable asset to the “riding”
community.
That, and weather.
“We get a lot of rain and snowy weather,” said Levi.

THE PLAYGROUND
North Coast consists of a 7500 square foot riding area, complete with
rails, box jumps, wall rides, half pipes, street section and foam pit.
The foam pit – which measures 16’ by 16’ and is five feet deep –
allows riders to practice tricks, allowing them to concentrate on
moves and not, so much, the landing.
“You practice your tricks in the foam and then go to the box jump,”
said Jesse. “We didn’t spend hardly any money on the pit. It’s all
recycled material from upholstery shops and manufacturing places. We
only paid about $100 for the wood.
North Coast’s capacity holds up to 20 spectators and up to 40 people
in the actual park. The facility also offers private birthday parties.
“We have a ping pong table and music streaming. It’s a good
atmosphere,” said Jesse. “We get a lot of teens, anywhere from 10 to
25 years old, and even younger kids.”
As far as skill level goes, the brothers say it ranges from
professional and sponsored riders to the just-starting-out.

ERASING THE STEREOTYPE
“The skill level varies, but everyone is really positive,” said Jesse.
“Our place is a little more friendly for a beginner, being people pay
to be here. There’s always somebody watching over the park. Even the
older guys are a little more courteous to the younger guys,” said
Levi. “We really are pushing a family-friendly atmosphere. We want
everyone to feel welcome and comfortable.
When it comes to the stereotype of young skateboarders and bikers
being “bad” or “rude,” the brothers say you’ll only see good people at
their park.
“They take care of you when you fall down. When someone does a good
trick, people are yelling and cheering,” said Jesse. “You can see them
as a misfit crowd, but they take care of themselves and each other.”

North Coast Freeride is located at 887 Lynch Drive in Traverse City,
just south of Cherry Capital Airport. Hours are Monday through
Thursday, 2 p.m.-9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; and
Sunday, noon-9 p.m. For rules, rates and information on booking a
party, call 231-929-4962 or check out their page on Facebook.

 
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