Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Grinding the rails
. . . .

Grinding the rails

Erin Crowell - April 5th, 2010
Grinding the Rails at North Coast Freeride
By Erin Crowell
Several months ago, Levi Kyser took his mountain bike to Ray’s
Mountain Bike Park, an indoor skate and bike park in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It was an inspirational trip for the Traverse City native, who has
traveled to places such as New Jersey, West Virginia and New York as a
semi-professional downhill mountain biker.
“I came home and wanted somewhere indoors to ride, so I built some
small ramps in my basement and it snowballed into this place,” says
Kyser.
The place is North Coast Freeride, an indoor bike and skate park in
Traverse City. Kyser, along with brother Jesse, opened the venue in
January.
“We see all the kids down at the public park and the way things go.
There’s no supervision,” said Jesse. “Some parents don’t want to drop
off their kids. We figured there was a market for it.”
The brothers say supervision and safety is the number one reason why
they believe the indoor park is a valuable asset to the “riding”
community.
That, and weather.
“We get a lot of rain and snowy weather,” said Levi.

THE PLAYGROUND
North Coast consists of a 7500 square foot riding area, complete with
rails, box jumps, wall rides, half pipes, street section and foam pit.
The foam pit – which measures 16’ by 16’ and is five feet deep –
allows riders to practice tricks, allowing them to concentrate on
moves and not, so much, the landing.
“You practice your tricks in the foam and then go to the box jump,”
said Jesse. “We didn’t spend hardly any money on the pit. It’s all
recycled material from upholstery shops and manufacturing places. We
only paid about $100 for the wood.
North Coast’s capacity holds up to 20 spectators and up to 40 people
in the actual park. The facility also offers private birthday parties.
“We have a ping pong table and music streaming. It’s a good
atmosphere,” said Jesse. “We get a lot of teens, anywhere from 10 to
25 years old, and even younger kids.”
As far as skill level goes, the brothers say it ranges from
professional and sponsored riders to the just-starting-out.

ERASING THE STEREOTYPE
“The skill level varies, but everyone is really positive,” said Jesse.
“Our place is a little more friendly for a beginner, being people pay
to be here. There’s always somebody watching over the park. Even the
older guys are a little more courteous to the younger guys,” said
Levi. “We really are pushing a family-friendly atmosphere. We want
everyone to feel welcome and comfortable.
When it comes to the stereotype of young skateboarders and bikers
being “bad” or “rude,” the brothers say you’ll only see good people at
their park.
“They take care of you when you fall down. When someone does a good
trick, people are yelling and cheering,” said Jesse. “You can see them
as a misfit crowd, but they take care of themselves and each other.”

North Coast Freeride is located at 887 Lynch Drive in Traverse City,
just south of Cherry Capital Airport. Hours are Monday through
Thursday, 2 p.m.-9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; and
Sunday, noon-9 p.m. For rules, rates and information on booking a
party, call 231-929-4962 or check out their page on Facebook.

 
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