Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Grinding the rails
. . . .

Grinding the rails

Erin Crowell - April 5th, 2010
Grinding the Rails at North Coast Freeride
By Erin Crowell
Several months ago, Levi Kyser took his mountain bike to Ray’s
Mountain Bike Park, an indoor skate and bike park in Cincinnati, Ohio.
It was an inspirational trip for the Traverse City native, who has
traveled to places such as New Jersey, West Virginia and New York as a
semi-professional downhill mountain biker.
“I came home and wanted somewhere indoors to ride, so I built some
small ramps in my basement and it snowballed into this place,” says
Kyser.
The place is North Coast Freeride, an indoor bike and skate park in
Traverse City. Kyser, along with brother Jesse, opened the venue in
January.
“We see all the kids down at the public park and the way things go.
There’s no supervision,” said Jesse. “Some parents don’t want to drop
off their kids. We figured there was a market for it.”
The brothers say supervision and safety is the number one reason why
they believe the indoor park is a valuable asset to the “riding”
community.
That, and weather.
“We get a lot of rain and snowy weather,” said Levi.

THE PLAYGROUND
North Coast consists of a 7500 square foot riding area, complete with
rails, box jumps, wall rides, half pipes, street section and foam pit.
The foam pit – which measures 16’ by 16’ and is five feet deep –
allows riders to practice tricks, allowing them to concentrate on
moves and not, so much, the landing.
“You practice your tricks in the foam and then go to the box jump,”
said Jesse. “We didn’t spend hardly any money on the pit. It’s all
recycled material from upholstery shops and manufacturing places. We
only paid about $100 for the wood.
North Coast’s capacity holds up to 20 spectators and up to 40 people
in the actual park. The facility also offers private birthday parties.
“We have a ping pong table and music streaming. It’s a good
atmosphere,” said Jesse. “We get a lot of teens, anywhere from 10 to
25 years old, and even younger kids.”
As far as skill level goes, the brothers say it ranges from
professional and sponsored riders to the just-starting-out.

ERASING THE STEREOTYPE
“The skill level varies, but everyone is really positive,” said Jesse.
“Our place is a little more friendly for a beginner, being people pay
to be here. There’s always somebody watching over the park. Even the
older guys are a little more courteous to the younger guys,” said
Levi. “We really are pushing a family-friendly atmosphere. We want
everyone to feel welcome and comfortable.
When it comes to the stereotype of young skateboarders and bikers
being “bad” or “rude,” the brothers say you’ll only see good people at
their park.
“They take care of you when you fall down. When someone does a good
trick, people are yelling and cheering,” said Jesse. “You can see them
as a misfit crowd, but they take care of themselves and each other.”

North Coast Freeride is located at 887 Lynch Drive in Traverse City,
just south of Cherry Capital Airport. Hours are Monday through
Thursday, 2 p.m.-9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; and
Sunday, noon-9 p.m. For rules, rates and information on booking a
party, call 231-929-4962 or check out their page on Facebook.

 
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