Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Essayist sets life‘s questions to music

Elizabeth Buzzelli - April 12th, 2010
Essayist sets life’s questions to music
By Elizabeth Buzzelli
DRIVING WITH DVORAK:
Essays on Memory and Identity
By Fleda Brown
University of Nebraska Press
$24.94

If the unexamined life, as Socrates said, isn’t worth living, then Fleda Brown’s is truly a valuable life. Her new book: Driving with Dvorak: Essays on Memory and Identity, could have been a memoir, except that it isn’t—exactly.
What it is are snapshots -- or maybe better -- X-rays from an ordinary life: father, mother, two sisters, three husbands, children, a retarded brother who dies young, a decaying summer cottage on Michigan’s Central Lake, other American places: east, west, Midwest. Scenes from a woman’s life, a poet’s life, that dive beneath the surface to return with reasons, discoveries, new understanding, new pain, new acceptance -- all the bits of life that make us human beings.
First there is the father, a prominent person in the book and in Brown’s life. In the title essay, he is old, he is angry, and she goads him as she did as a teen. Her sin? She used too much dish soap while washing dishes. She is 44, a grown woman, and doesn’t think she has to tolerate his fits of anger, his penuriousness, his inability to act in his own best interest, and even his self-loathing. She talks back only to have him yell, “By God, I’ll hit you.” Maybe this is where the book begins, with a need to know this man, this husband, this father. Then maybe to learn something valuable about herself.
What she can share with her father is music. Therefore Dvorak, Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky. Not in an intellectual joust but in the silent ways music connects person to person, down in what Brown calls an ‘’inarticulate core.”

TRACING A MELODY
Of all the essays in the book, this one comes closest to posing a question about her life and then answering it. “But look at me now,” she challenges as she drives along, grown, independent, still with the baggage of the past. Again there is music. Adagio to largo; childhood to present time, she traces the melody a family hums throughout time. Every family a different tune, maybe hers more discordant than most. Then she tells us ... art sends you back to memory, where it came from. You can’t have the original which maybe never was the right thing, but you can have this. And soft, the little wisps, rising from the lake: the angels, the annunciation. You have to bow your head, to receive it, all of it, down on you, its sheer trumpets, clarinets, the joy of its French horn.
In “Walls Six Feet Thick” the memories of summer homes is used as a way into knowing her mother. First there was the decaying houses on Central Lake, then on to others in her life. Childhood to age. In one she is a young girl, in another a grandmother. But her mother haunts these pages, this woman ...Who has mostly managed to stay out of sight until now. Her mother is the misfit; the girl who resents her husband’s family for their easy grasp of life, who takes out her anger in pathetic smallness when her sister-in-law is far into dementia, scoffing at her, the woman who no longer knows enough to get under a blanket to keep warm.
Later in the book, the smallness reverberates back on this cringing, crying woman, remembered by her daughter with a mixture of anger and disgust and love. The woman dies alone. The father got the news she was dying but ignored it, didn’t tell his children, until she was gone. And Brown is left, later in the book, facing what he ultimately stole from his children: their last moment with their mother. And stole from her the children bending above her, their last ‘I love you.’

KILLING THE CATS
Of all the essays in this book, “Returning the Cats” touched me most, on level after level. Brown and her husband, Jerry, have taken in two cats. They’ve tried everything to love their animals but the cats are laws on to themselves. They pee and poop in the house. They hide when they have to go to the vet, scratch and claw when their nails are cut. They aren’t warm and loving. They must finally go to the humane society and Brown takes them, confronting one of those horribly painful choices we’re all forced to make from time to time, despite good intentions, despite what we’d like to believe about ourselves. Brown uses the salve of an allergic son-in-law to quell the guilt good people feel when they fall short of their own moral expectations. But she has deeper anxieties over letting her cats down. She has the memory of her father—yet again—as he cruelly kills kittens their mother cat has had because he was too cheap to have her spayed, and then doing worse as Brown cowers in her room, trying not to hear.
That a name is put to why her father is the way he is, so near the end of his life, can’t be made to matter. Anger runs too deep. That he was a tenured professor, took on the largest questions of the world and tried to find solutions, haunts her. At last, wanting to find excuses and finding them too late, or seeing them as too weak, she asks, Who knows what channels may lie in his mind that lead away from pain and toward the joy? He’s smart enough to have figured how to carve them.
Don’t expect morality tales here. Nothing is that easy. Badness is confronted with wonder that it exists at all. Good is savored. In this non-linear examination of a single life, Brown delivers biography through philosophy and a poetic voice never consciously poetic.
Driving with Dvorak is a truly glorious and intelligent achievement; the biography I’ve always wanted to read, where connections are drawn and savored, where academic distance doesn’t take the place of emotion, where layers lie loosely over profound depths that glitter up through the years and hours, through the characters that people and draw the outlines of this single life.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli’s next novel, Dead Sleeping Shaman, will be in bookstores in May.



 
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