Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · The Boardman River Nature...
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The Boardman River Nature Center

Erin Crowell - April 19th, 2010
Wild Times in the City : The Boardman River Nature Center
By Erin Crowell
Before the Boardman River Nature Center opened its doors two years ago, there wasn’t an education facility dedicated to conservation efforts in the Grand Traverse region.
“It’s kind of shocking for this kind of community,” says Colleen Masterson-Bzdok, education director of the Boardman Center.
Located on Cass Road, just south of Traverse City in the Boardman River Valley, the center opened in 2008 as the gateway to seven miles of trails running through 500 acres of forest, fields, marshes and wildlife habitat along the river. In addition to being the starting point for a trail system along the Boardman River, the center has provoked a positive response from the community with the multitude of programs and events. It is also at the center of activity with the Grand Traverse Conservation District.

‘NATURE IS CALLING’
The motto of the nature center is “Nature is Calling,” and visitors both young and old can find a way to answer. With programs geared to preschools up through adults, the nature center’s goal is to get everyone involved.
“This has allowed us to reach the whole community, especially children,” says Masterson-Bzdok. “Kids are much more disconnected from nature. The things they actually do outside like soccer and baseball and soccer are structured activities. There’s not a lot of free play and they’re allowed to do that here – to explore nature.”
Every Tuesday, preschoolers and their guardians are invited to participate in Peepers – the program with seasonal nature themes, from 10-11:30am. Families of all ages can enjoy weekend programs like All About Owls, held Saturday, April 24, from 1-2pm. Most programs have a recommended donation of $5, unless otherwise noted.
Other eco-conscious organizations have used the nature center to present programs, including the Grand Traverse Audubon Club and the Grand Traverse Hiking Club. On Thursday, April 22, the Audubon Club presents a program on wind power, from 7-9pm for teens and adults. On Tuesday, April 20, from 7-9pm, listen to the story of Ray Raehl’s and Roger Landfair’s journey through Bhutan by bicycle, presented by the Hiking Club.
“Generally we expect anywhere from 10 to 20 people at a program,” says Jon Prins, outreach specialist with the center. “At our spring break nature program, we got over 300.”

ECO CONSCIOUS EFFORTS
While educational programs remain at the heart of the center, residents can put that knowledge to work. Conservation programs such as the Land Management Service and the Native Plant Rescue Program have maintained trails, uprooted invasive species, and restored eroding stream banks.
In 2009, the Land Management Services team maintained 24.5 miles of trails on 3,000+ acres in eight parklands, according to the Conservation District’s Annual Report. Over 4,500 plants were rescued from areas booked to be bulldozed.
The nature center also hosts an annual seedling sale, offering a variety of native plants, with close to 8,000 white pine seedlings to be donated to area schools. With financial support from Traverse City Light & Power, the seedling sale is one of the major fundraisers for the Conservation District.
The center relies on grants, contracts and donations to support its operations – an expense close to $706,000. Last year, education programs accounted for $11,000, contributing to the $642,000 that helped cover 2009’s operating expenses.
Masterson-Bzdok says the community plays a big role in supporting the center financially. “We know it’s difficult to spend money on extracurricular activities, and so we try to keep program fees low,” she says.

The Boardman River Nature Center is located at 1450 Cass Road in Traverse City. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4p.m. For more information on programs, visit www.natureiscalling.org or call 941-0960.


 
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