Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Jazz meets Boogie
. . . .

Jazz meets Boogie

Kristi Kates - April 26th, 2010
Jazz meets Boogie: Matthew Ball wraps up Dennos concert season
By Kristi Kates
Called both “the Gen-X arrival to this uniquely American art form” and
“The Boogie-Woogie Kid,” pianist Matthew Ball specializes in the blues and
- yes, boogie-woogie piano - and will be performing at the Dennos Museum
Center as the wrap-up to the 2009-2010 Dennos concert season.
The Michigan native, who attended both Oakland University and the
University of Detroit Mercy Law School, may have succeeded in graduating;
but that feeling of accomplishment didn’t last long. Ball quickly became
disillusioned by the 9-to-5 office grind, and a visit to the 2001 Motor
City Boogie-Woogie and Blues Festival literally changed his life.
Ball, inspired by the performers at the event, quickly sought out
Boogie-Woogie Hall of Famer Bob Seeley, and managed to talk the busy
pianist into giving him lessons.
“It helped that I had classical training,” says Ball, “but boogie-woogie
and blues are very different.”
After a lot of hard work, Ball found himself headlining - a mere four
years later - with some of the same performers he’d seen live in 2001.
Ball proves that for some, with effort, life can definitely get a reboot.

JAZZ N’ BOOGIE
Ball today performs frequently as a jazz pianist, but more importantly is
working to advocate the boogie-woogie music form. “It’s a brand of jazz
you don’t hear on radio stations, that you don’t see in the major concert
halls... and that’s not right,” he explains.
The Dennos - at least in its case - would respectfully disagree.
“Actually, piano boogie has been somewhat of a staple over the years with
projects that have been led for us by Mr. B from Ann Arbor, another great
player,” Dennos Museum Director Gene Jenneman says, “I booked Matthew to
introduce a new talent in this musical genre to our audience members who
enjoy the music. Having Bob Seeley as a mentor means he’s quite likely to
offer a great show!”
Seeley himself has played at the Dennos, while Jenneman says that Ball, by
turn, brings “respect for the genre” as well.
“I am looking forward to hearing him in concert, and he will be with his
wife who plays drums - we have not had that combination in a boogie
concert before,” Jenneman explains, “he really stands out because of the
musical genre and his youth. Corky Siegel did some piano boogie in his
concert last November, but not as a full concert as Matthew will.”

Matthew Ball will perform in concert at the Dennos Museum Center, Traverse
City, on May 1. Tickets may be purchased online at www.dennosmuseum.org,
or by calling the box office at 231-995-1553; more info about Matthew can
be found online at www.boogiewoogiekid.com.
 
 
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