Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The Roundabout...
. . . .

The Roundabout Revolution

Robert Downes - May 3rd, 2010
The Roundabout Revolution
You don’t usually think of ‘going in circles’ as being progress, but
that’s definitely the case when it comes to a plan to introduce
roundabouts to the highways of Northern Michigan.
A roundabout is a traffic circle that does away with the need for
traffic lights. Instead, traffic flows in a slow, consistent speed
through the intersection, yielding to cars inside the circle.
Roundabouts save lives, cut fuel expenses, and end the aggravation of
sitting at a red light. What’s not to like?
At a recent Traverse City Commission study session, supporters cheered
a plan to add up to five roundabouts along Division Street in town, a
notorious speedway traversed by up to 33,000 vehicles per day that is
unsafe for both motorists and pedestrians.
The Division Design Initiative, created by traffic-calming specialists
the URS Corporation, with input by the City of Traverse City, is an
imaginative plan that would do away with several traffic lights along
roughly a mile of the highway. In their place would be small
roundabouts fronted by ‘yield’ signs, allowing traffic to flow through
at a slow but steady pace.
Skeptics of the plan should try driving down Division at rush hour
during the summer, at which time traffic is backed up for half a mile
or more, waiting for the light to change at 14th Street. Roundabouts
are said to cut traffic waiting time by 65%.
One supporter of the plan is Ray Minervini, developer of the Grand
Traverse Commons, just west of Division.
Minervini just got back from vacationing in Reggio Emilia in northern
Italy, a town of approximately 120,000 people which doesn’t have a
single traffic light because they’ve all been replaced by roundabouts.
“You can drive all over town and never stop for a traffic light,” he
says. “It’s fantastic.”
Europe is far ahead of the United States in the roundabout revolution.
Both England and France have roughly 30,000 roundabouts in place. By
contrast, there are about 2,000 in the United States -- one of which
happens to be in Gaylord.
Minervini is especially supportive of roundabouts on Division Street
because the Grand Traverse Commons and its Village at Building 50 is
booming with new business and residents. Taken along with the growth
of neighboring Munson Medical Center, traffic pressure is being pushed
to the breaking point in the area.
Coincidentally, two of the most dangerous intersections in Traverse
City are just off the Commons development: at 14th and Division and
11th and Division.
I recall a popular, good-hearted co-worker from Munson Medical Center
who was killed at the intersection of 14th and Division years ago. If
roundabouts had been in place then, perhaps she would still be alive,
because they prevent the possibility of motorists speeding through the
intersection, resulting in the kind of ‘T-bone’ collisions that kill
thousands of people each year in our country.
Statistics show a dramatic decrease in traffic injuries and fatalities
wherever roundabouts are established. The Netherlands installed 400
roundabouts in the 1980s and saw traffic fatalities drop by 72%. In
Carmel, Indiana, traffic accidents decreased by 78% with the addition
of roundabouts seven years ago.
Roundabouts save money as well as lives: Carmel reports that the cost
of constructing a roundabout is $125,000 less than what it takes to
create an intersection with a traffic light.
In terms of saving on fuel costs, it’s estimated that even a modest
increase in the use of roundabouts in the United States would “save
twice as much gasoline as drilling for offshore oil,” according to an
organization called Designs for America. Carmel, IN, reports a savings
of 24,000 gallons of gasoline per year at each of its roundabouts as
the result of less car idling. The State of Virginia claims that its
10 roundabouts save 200,000 gallons of gas per year.
The roundabouts being considered for Traverse City are different from
the large-scale ‘rotary’ circles found in Boston and Massachusetts,
which have earned some justified criticism. Our roundabouts would be
smaller, slower and safer.
“It takes some getting used to, but you only have to drive through a
roundabout once to get the idea,” Minervini says.
The Michigan Department of Transportation would have the final say in
whether roundabouts will be incorporated into a plan to improve
Division Street. MDOT has already constructed roundabouts in Benton
Harbor, Muskegon, Sterling Heights, Saginaw and other cities and plans
to build more. We can only hope that with strong support from
Traverse City and many organizations ranging from the County Road
Commission to TART Trails and Munson Medical Center, that roundabouts
will get the green light here as well.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close