Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Books for Walls Project
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The Books for Walls Project

Erin Crowell - May 3rd, 2010
The Books for Walls Project
By Erin Crowell
This story is about fathers and daughters, mothers and husbands. It’s about the sharing of ideas – a story about stories, inspired by a poem.
The Books for Walls Project is a virtual dinner table, surrounded by conversation. The topic is primordial, the medium – modern.
Enter www.BooksForWallsProject.org and discuss your favorite book, your newest book and books you have yet to read. Listen. Others are reading too.
Books for Walls was a family project, set in motion by a mother who wanted to share her family’s conversation about books, hoping to inspire others to join in the discussion – an open seat, if you will, around the dinner table.

starting WITH BOOKS
The Moehle home sits near the shores of Turtle Lake, somewhere in the woods between Honor and Beulah. Inside, freshly brewed tea sits on the kitchen table, a jar of local Sleeping Bear Farms honey accompanies a tray of chocolate covered trail mix.
The walls are covered with quotes – not framed or hung, but sketched in Sharpie marker and crayon directly on covered drywall.
“We told the girls they could draw and write on the walls before we repainted them,” says Amy Daniels Moehle. “That was five years ago.”
Daniels Moehle points out her daughters’ artistic evolutions, colorful cartoon scribbles to sophisticated quotes by Anne Frank and Diana Cohn. Amy—“The Mom,” as she is called on the Books for Walls website—has used books as the primary tool for her daughers’ home school educations.
“We wanted to start them with books, and then introduce them to the world of media later,” she says. “I believe you can set a child on your lap and read them a story and they are perfectly happy and focused. It’s natural to see a four-year-old with a book, it’s not natural to see them with a laptop.”

OLD SCHOOL
The Daniels Moehle girls, Nadia (a.k.a. “The Big Sister”) and Sonja (“The Little Sister”), just recently started learning how to use a computer; and with that, the Internet – but they weren’t impressed.
“Ugh, you’re wasting a whole day,” Nadia groans as she describes surfing the web. “You could be spending it reading or being outside.”
It’s a frame of mind most young children today do not possess; and although they have identified that fact, it’s something Nadia and Sonja do not understand.
“Sometimes Sonja and I will be reading and mom will be using the computer,” says Nadia. “It’s like our roles are switched! She used to be on Facebook. There’s something wrong with her brain.”

BOOKS FOR WALLS
While unimpressed, the girls have found some use for the computer – mainly, as a tool for sharing their favorite books, their current reads and more with family and friends around the world.
The Books for Walls Project was born from that same idea of sharing stories. Amy once shared a story with her daughters about a poem her father had written about a family friend – a man who owned many books. So many, in fact, that books hid behind other books on his wall shelves.
Plates now empty but table company lingers Around warming conversation
One conversation winning over many
One laugh laughed by all…
… Crackling fire and field view window
Frame Books for Walls
In his lamb-skinned rocker…
…Leafing, listening, watching, smiling.
The Bundle found,
Books for Walls’ warm edict issues forth…

The poem inspired “The Mom,” who, in turn, inspired “Big” and “Little Sister” to share this idea of conversation about literature. Today, the family regularly posts online “assignments” – inviting family members and friends to think more about books. For example, “First Line/Last Line” challenges a person to place value on a book based on the first and last lines of the story. Other assignments are simple, like what was your favorite book growing up?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE CHILDHOOD BOOK?
It’s a question that took the Daniels Moehle family and the rest of the nation by surprise when National Public Radio host Diane Rehm came for a special live broadcast at the City Opera House on April 7.
Amy and her mother, Kathy (a.k.a. “The Bean”), went to the event, bringing with them that week’s challenge. Amy approached one of the microphones during the Q&A portion.
“My quick question is for my two daughters. They wanted to know what your very favorite book was when you were six or ten” – an innocent questioned that elicited laughter from the audience, but evoked a thoughtful and intimate response from Rehm.
“Well, here is the truth,” Rehm replied from the stage. “There was not a single book in our home.” Rehm went on to describe her childhood, saying her parents did not believe in education for girls; and, therefore, she did not read a full book until she was 21.
“I couldn’t believe it,” Nadia says. “I have so many books right now, I just can’t imagine not growing up with books.”
So how many books does the family have?
“A thousand,” says Nadia.
“A thousand and two!” Sonja adds excitedly.

BOOKS & MOTHERHOOD
Their enthusiasm for books comes from Amy’s own love for literature. Just before she and husband David (a.k.a. “The Dad”) decided to become parents, Amy quit her job and spent an entire year reading.
“I decided to stop looking for satisfying work that paid a decent wage; and worked, instead, on expanding my mind and maintaining inspiration. I also joke that I never really worked until I became a mother,” she says.
Part of that job is encouraging learning and communication through books, the sharing of stories and ideas. Books for Walls has allowed the girls to touch an education beyond their home.
“We have friends and family and others from around the world that follow our blog,” Amy says. “Every time we get a new follower, we find out where they’re from and learn about their home.”
Amy pulls out a map of the U.S., sprinkled by dots marking the location of somebody new in the online conversation.
“The girls get to learn all about the states and other countries,” she says. “What country did we learn about recently that was really interesting?” she asks the girls.
“The Netherlands,” says Nadia. Sonja nods her head in agreement.
While the Books for Walls project has become a learning tool for her children, Amy says she is also learning just as much.
“I’m learning at an alarming rate,” she laughs.

The Books for Walls Project is an online community of avid book readers, inspiring people to think and discuss literature. Join the conversation by visiting their website at www.BooksForWallsProject.org. There, you will find a link to a library nearest you, along with several “assignments” to get you thinking. For an audio clip of the Diane Rehm question, click on the link to the Interlochen Public Radio website, which includes an interview with the family by Linda Stephan.

 
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