Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Turning the tables
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Turning the tables

Erin Crowell - May 10th, 2010
Turning the Tables: A foster care success story
By Erin Crowell
“It was a long two years,” Brittany Denzel says of her time earning cosmetology certification at Traverse City Beauty College. As the sole graduate on May 5, the 21-year-old Denzel donned a pink tiara and colorful eye shadow – a runway themed graduation that matched her outlook on life.
You could say the bubbly, outgoing young woman has been struttin’ her stuff. While many young adults face challenges after being discharged from the foster care system, Denzel has thrived. She will share her success story with audiences at the 9th Annual Festival of Tables, a fundraising event for Child and Family Services of Northwestern Michigan, held May 14 & 15 at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City.

A CHANGE IN LANDSCAPE
Denzel entered the foster care system at the age of 14. She and her brothers, ages three and nine, were in an “unstable living situation,” as Denzel puts it. They were placed in an emergency care home.
“Child and Family Services said we couldn’t stay there long and I didn’t like that,” says Denzel. “The family had four biological daughters. I grew really close to them.”
Just days after moving into their first foster home, the three siblings were sent to live with David and Lynette Schneider of Brethren.
“I like being outdoors; and living in the country, that’s been my dream. We had horses and a river and a pond. You got to have time to yourself. It wasn’t a go, go place,” Denzel recalls.
It was a change in landscape; but Denzel said the adults in her life changed just as quickly.
“I would get really close to a case worker and then, all of a sudden, they left – which happened a lot,” she says. “You develop trust with your case worker, and I actually had a lot of trust issues with adults for awhile because of that.”
Most of Denzel’s case workers left the agency for different job opportunities, says Family Services’ Echo Dean – the last case worker who followed Denzel through her final months of foster care.
“At first, it was hard for me to open up,” Denzel says of her last case worker. “But I really liked her name. I mean, Echo – how cool is that? We became great friends.”
Dean proved to be one of the consistent elements in Denzel’s life, along with the ever-present support from the Schneider family.
“They really taught me I was better than the standard my biological family had set for me,” Denzel says.

IN THE FAMILY
Denzel won’t be alone when she shares her story at the Festival of Tables – Denzel’s “niece,” seven-year-old Summer will also discuss her experience living with a new family.
Amy Young, Denzel’s foster sister, adopted Summer a few years back.
“I really started getting a heart for foster care when my parents were taking kids in,” says Young.
In January, Young and her husband adopted five foster children under their care, which included Summer, bringing the Young household total to 10.
“One day, Summer wrote a paper in school talking about her experience going into foster care, and she read it in front of the class” says Young. “She talked about how thankful she is, that foster care helps kids find their families. She said ‘The family I was in before didn’t make good choices for me; but God was looking all over the world and found a family that made good choices for me.’ I guess she had all the teachers crying.”
Summer will read her paper at the Festival of Tables.

STICKING WITH IT
While her brothers returned home after just six months in foster care, Denzel decided to stick with it – staying in the system until she was 18.
“It forced me to grow up,” says Denzel. “It was an opportunity to mature and be a different person.”
Denzel proved her maturity through her many aspirations, which included graduating from Brethren High School and attending Teen Mania Ministries, located in Garden Valley, Texas where she went on mission trips.
“When I met Brittany, she was already a senior in high school,” says Dean. “By that point, she already had an idea of what her goals were.”
“She has had support from her foster parents and always will, whether it’s on paper or in their hearts,” Dean says.
Today, Denzel is self-sufficient, working two jobs – including a position as a direct care worker at Pete’s Place, a Traverse City homeless shelter for teens.
Denzel also now lives with her two brothers and biological mother.
“The relationship with my mom is a total 180,” says Denzel. “I guess we learned how to talk to each other. Before, there was just screaming, now we’re such good friends, we talk about everything.”

The Festival of Tables will be held May 14 & 15 at the Hagerty Center, in Traverse City. The event features a variety of table displays, some of which are up for auction and raffle. Proceeds benefit Child and Family Services of Northwestern Michigan. Friday includes the Gala Preview and the (Not) Just for Men Tent, 6 p.m.; Saturday is the Ladies Luncheon, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. More information is available at festivaloftables.org.


 
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