Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · This week‘s biggest...
. . . .

This week‘s biggest losers

George Foster - May 24th, 2010
This Week’s Biggest Losers
As fans, why are we always shocked when our sports gods prove to be very
human? The continual reports of cheating, lying, and ill-manners, not to
mention criminal behavior is enough to bring us to the jarring conclusion
that celebrity athletes may not worthy of our worship.
Hanley Ramirez is the biggest loser in baseball so far this season. During
a play last week, the Florida Marlins shortstop trotted after the ball as
if he was running underwater while the opposition sprinted for extra
bases. When his manager, Fredi Gonzalez, called out Ramirez for loafing on
the play, Ramirez responded in the press that his manager had never
actually played at major league level, so what does he know?
Hanley, your manager knows what every little leaguer learns by ten years
old: always hustle, never quit running until the play is over. Though
Ramirez is the face of the Marlins franchise and has signed a $70 million
contract to play for Florida, he apparently hasn’t figured out that trying
hard is important if winning the game is your goal.
After his manager benched Ramirez and demanded an apology before the All
Star could return to the playing field, the relatively unknown Florida
skipper became everyone’s favorite manager.
When U.S. born cyclist Floyd Landis recently admitted to long-time steroid
use, he ended four years of continually refuting that drugs might have
contributed to his surprising win at the 2006 Tour de France (he was
disqualified afterward). Landis now claims he had been doping since 2002
when he joined the US Postal Service team, led by cycling’s most prominent
steroid-denier, Lance Armstrong.
Landis is a multiple-loser this week: confessing to cheating with banned
drugs on the bicycle-racing circuit, lying for years about his drug-use,
and accusing Armstrong and others to be accomplices in the same doping
activities.
Landis is the same guy who wrote a book in 2007claiming that he won the
Tour drug-free and appeared on Larry King Live as recent as several months
ago to plead his case that he is clean. Even for those who have supported
Landis, he has no credibility left.
The New Jersey Nets not only were the worst team in the NBA this past
season, they lost in the draft lottery and won’t pick first from the pool
of available college players as they deserve. The Nets new owner, Russian
billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov, must suspect a vast right-wing Yankee
conspiracy to prevent his franchise from drafting either of the two best
players available.
Let me be the first to predict that Prokhorov will attempt to cast off the
Nets’ yoke of futility by signing free-agent LeBron James to the richest
contract in history. Prokhorov is rich enough to do it and will have some
cash left over from not needing to pay for the number one draft pick this
year.
Prokhorov’s vision of an international following for his team
(particularly in Russia) might be possible if he can bring the best
basketball player in the world to New Jersey - Czar James I.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close