Letters

Letters 12-14-2014

Come Together There is a time-honored war strategy known as “divide and conquer,” and never has it been more effective than now. The enemy is using it against us through television, internet and other social media. I opened a Facebook account a couple of years back to gain more entries in local contests. Since then I had fallen under its spell; I rushed into judgment on several social issues based on information found on those pages

Quiet The Phones! This weekend we attended two beautiful Christmas musical events and the enjoyment of both were significantly diminished by self-absorbed boors holding their stupid iPhones high overhead to capture extremely crucial and highly needed photos. We too own iPhones, but during a public concert we possess the decency and manners to leave them turned off and/or at home. Today’s performance, the annual Messiah Sing at Traverse City’s Central Methodist Church, was a new low: we watched as Mr. Self-Absorbed not only took several photos but then afterwards immediately posted them to his Facebook page. We were dumbfounded.

A Torturous Defense In defense of the C.I.A.’s use of torture in a mostly fruitless search for vital information, some suggest that the dire situation facing us after 9-11, justified the use of torture even at the expense of the potential loss of much of our nation’s moral authority.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Soul Searching
. . . .

Soul Searching

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - May 31st, 2010
Soul Searching: Three take top prize in Michigan Writers Chapbook Contest
By Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli
As all writers eventually discover, writing is a lonely business. Not just the hours spent at a computer, but the aftermath — trying to sell the work that has kept the writer busy for months, or even years. As local writer John Mauk notes: “Authors can’t write and then fall into a hole… Authors have to carry their work into the world — even when it’s heavy.”
It’s because of this ‘carrying into the world’ that the Michigan Writers organization began a chapbook contest in 2005. Chapbooks tend to be small books issued by poets or essayists for an appreciative readership of like-minded souls.
The three winners of the 2010 Michigan Writers’ Chapbook contest are John Mauk, English rhetoric professor at NMC, for his short stories, “The Rest of Us”; Jennifer Sperry Steinorth for her poetry collection, “Forking the Swift”; and Sarah Baughman for her essays, “Growing in Seasons.”
What are their thoughts on the writing life?
“In a previous life, I was a dog,” Mauk says. “Whenever I like something, I want to howl back in kind. Years ago, after I finished my PhD in rhetoric, I decided that I was going to read fiction, get my head into something besides theory. Along the way I rediscovered the novel—what it does, how it pulls you forward and knocks you around. It’s taken me years of weird noises, awful guttural hacking, to make a sound worthy of the wind. In short, this is my first formal literary howl.”

SOLITARY ACT
Of being one of this year’s winners, essayist Sarah Baughman of Petoskey has this to say: “Writing is a fairly solitary act, but ultimately you hope that your words will ring true for others and in some way echo a common human experience.”
Baughman says her collection “tracks my pregnancy and my son’s birth within the framework of Northern Michigan’s four seasons. Working on this collection has reminded me of the surprises inherent in the writing process.”
Poet, Jennifer Sperry Steinorth, a graduate of the Interlochen Arts Academy where she majored in dance, is a builder and designer for a small, green-building company in Traverse City. When asked why she writes, Jennifer says, “That’s a hard one to answer. We try and make sense. Sometimes the conversations we have are internal, but it’s easy to get lost in the mind. Wishing to put one’s work into the world publicly is like wishing to participate in a conversation that one has been listening to, rapt, knowing full well that one may sound very foolish.”
Of being chosen a winner in the Michigan Writers Chapbook contest, Steinorth adds, “We are rich to live in a place of such bounty: where exquisite food is produced both for body and the soul. I am humbled and grateful to those at Michigan Writers for providing this opportunity to add my fare to the cart, in hopes that someone may find some sustenance there.”
The three beautifully designed and published chapbooks are now out and available from Michigan Writers - www.michwriters.org - and in local bookstores.

Elizabeth Buzzelli’s new mystery, “Dead Sleeping Shaman” is now available at local bookstores.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close