Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Rasheda Ali Dinner Event
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Rasheda Ali Dinner Event

Rick Coates - May 31st, 2010
Rasheda Ali Dinner Event
By Rick Coates
Boxing legend Muhammad Ali is one of the most recognized figures in the world; despite not setting foot in the ring in 30 years Ali remains a popular figure. Today he is better known as the most famous person battling Parkinson’s disease, a far cry from his “floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee,” and “I am the greatest” days.
Ali’s daughter Rasheda will be in Traverse City on Thursday, June 3 to be the guest speaker at the 25th Anniversary Dinner to benefit the Grand Traverse Area Parkinson’s Support Group. The dinner follows their annual summer forum that features Dr. Stanley Fahn, M.D., Scientific Director of the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation and Chairperson of the Parkinson’s Community Research Advisory Council of the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson Research.
Rasheda Ali will also sign copies of her book I’ll Hold Your Hand So You Won’t Fall: A Child’s Guide to Parkinson’s Disease during the cocktail hour at the historic Traverse City Opera House. Her speech will include a special message from her father.

BRAVE WORDS
“’Never lose faith and never stop living each day to the fullest extent possible.’ Those are my father’s words not only to those battling Parkinson’s but also to the friends and families,” said Ali. “He adds these additional words of encouragement. ‘I wish all who find themselves part of this courageous battle much luck and I send them my gratitude and love.’”
Much of Rasheda Ali’s focus has been in supporting those who have family members battling Parkinson’s.
“For those who do not have a family member or close friend battling Parkinson’s, you are unaware of the stress and frustration levels those of who do are under,” said Ali. “I am a proponent of creating awareness to the needs of those caring for someone with Parkinson’s. Just simply volunteering a few hours a week to help a friend is a great way. Certainly donating money to organizations that are working towards a cure or to organizations that are providing support is another way to help.”
Until she was invited by the Grand Traverse Parkinson’s Support Group to come in and speak she was unaware of the organization.
“Here they have been around for 25 years and I was unaware of them. But I am very impressed at what they have accomplished. I can’t wait to visit and learn more about their efforts,” said Ali. “I have two young children so I limit my travel, but I felt anything I could do to help create awareness for them I was in favor of doing. I have been to Michigan several times to visit my father who used to live in Berrien Springs, but never this far north.”
Ali has a full day visiting the region including an appearance on the Omelette & Finster show on WKLT, visiting with elementary school children and attending the Parkinson’s forum at the City Opera House in the afternoon.

EARLY DETECTION
Parkinsons Disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs the sufferer’s motor skills, speech, and other functions. If caught early the progression of the disease may be slowed with drug and dietary treatments. But that is the key, catching the disease early.
“I am still amazed at how often people with Parkinson’s are misdiagnosed. I had a friend who went to his doctor and that doctor attributed my friend’s tremors to side affects to medicine he was taking. But I grew up watching my father and so I knew my friend had Parkinson’s,” said Ali. “He went to a motion disorders physician and I was right; I want to encourage anyone who has any of the four cardinal features, those being tremors, rigidity, akinesia and postural changes to get in and see a specialist.”
As for research towards creating a cure Ali feels a lot is being accomplished.
“I am impressed with the efforts to date, sure there is always more that can be done. Certainly my father and Michael J. Fox are to be commended for their efforts. My father’s foundation is focused on providing assistance and care for those currently with Parkinson’s and Michael’s is focused on finding a cure,” said Ali. “My father admires Michael very much, they have become good friends and both have used their celebrity to further along research and to assist those suffering and their families.”

THE CHAMP
Muhammad Ali had many great moments throughout his career, winning a Gold Medal in the 1960 Olympics, during the ‘60s and ‘70s he was the preeminent heavyweight boxer in the world. His greatest moment might well have been at the 1996 Summer Olympics when he lit the Olympic Flame. There were few dry eyes as a trembling Ali lit the Olympic Calderon.
“It was a great moment for my father,” said Ali. “He has faced the disease head-on just as he did every opponent he met in the ring.”
So how is Muhammad Ali doing today?
“He is doing well. I am so proud of him, he remains active. He flew into Vegas last month to watch the Mayweather fight, he loves boxing and gets out to matches as often as possible,” said Ali. “He also goes out to the movies, dinner and walks as often as possible. He feels it’s important to set an example to others; and also even with Parkinson’s you still should pursue quality of life.”

The Grand Traverse Area Parkinson’s Support Group is celebrating their 25th Anniversary this year with their annual summer forum on June 3, at the Hagerty Center, to be followed by a special 25th Anniversary Dinner featuring guest speaker, Rasheda Ali. The historic Traverse City Opera House will host the event from 6pm to 9pm, with a book signing opportunity from 5:30-7:00pm as well. To learn more about the event as well as the Grand Traverse Parkinson Support Group visit www.gtaparkinsonsgroup.org


 
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