Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Sports · Keep Gararaaga‘s...
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Keep Gararaaga‘s ‘perfect‘ game imperfect

George Foster - June 7th, 2010
Keep Galarraga’s ‘perfect game’ imperfect

I hate that X$*#%@ umpire who is obviously blind as a *%$&X# bat. Glad to
get that off my chest.
Yes, Armando Galarraga pitched the greatest game in Tigers’ history last
week and was robbed of a wild celebration that was richly deserved – the
aftermath of a rare perfect game.
Yes, umpire Jim Joyce shockingly called the Cleveland Indian’s 27th batter
safe at first. He seemed to be the only person viewing the game who
thought the runner’s foot beat Galarraga to the bag. Even Joyce admitted
after the game that he mistakenly called the runner safe, ruining
Galarraga’s gem.
And finally, yes, Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig has the authority to
reverse the call and give Galarraga credit for the out, resulting in one
of only 21 perfect games ever pitched in the Major Leagues.
But at what cost? Despite my own initial anger with the ump, with a little
more thought, it becomes obvious that the game’s results SHOULD NOT BE
CHANGED.
If this call is reversed based on video replay, what other calls should be
changed in baseball history? You may be old enough to remember Lou Brock’s
controversial “no-slide out” at home plate that helped turn the World
Series of 1968 in favor of the Tigers. What if video replay showed Brock
was safe? I don’t think today’s outraged Tigers’ fans would be willing to
change that important call, too.
You say you favor the use of instant replay in baseball – but to what
extent? We have the technological capability of eliminating umpires on the
field altogether, relying on cameras to make each call. Center field
cameras would be relied upon to determine balls and strikes. Other video
cameras could do a good job of making calls at the bases, determining if
catches are made, if home runs clear the fences, and whether batted balls
are fair or foul. Robots would throw new baseballs to the pitcher.
You can see the absurdity of relying on technology in the extreme, but
where do you draw the line once it becomes a bigger part of the game?
As much as I hated how Galarraga’s game ended, it would be more disturbing
if Commissioner Selig reverses the umpire’s call. The human touch added by
umpires is an important part of the game and should not be significantly
altered.


 
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