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Letters 03-02-2015

American Exceptualism Rudy Giuliani was espousing his opinion to Fox News that Barack Obama did not love America and didn’t brag enough about “American Exceptionalism.”

Fur Is Not Chic When my 25-pound dog stepped in a toothed steel leg hold trap a few ft off the trail, I learned how “unchic” fur is. I had to carry her out two miles to get to a vet.

Which Is More Dangerous? Just a couple of thoughts I had in response to the letters by Gordon Lee Dean and Jarin Weber in the Feb. 23 issue. Mr. Dean claims that there have been zero deaths from the measles in the past ten years.

Real Action on Climate In “Climate Madness” in the Feb. 9 issue, the writer points out that scientists are all but unanimous and that large numbers of people agree: global warming poses a threat to future generations.

Real Science Wolfgang Pauli, the Nobel Prize winning Austrian-born theoretical physicist, was known not only for his work in postulating the existence of the neutrino but feared for his razor-edged humor.

Home · Articles · News · Sports · Keep Gararaaga‘s...
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Keep Gararaaga‘s ‘perfect‘ game imperfect

George Foster - June 7th, 2010
Keep Galarraga’s ‘perfect game’ imperfect

I hate that X$*#%@ umpire who is obviously blind as a *%$&X# bat. Glad to
get that off my chest.
Yes, Armando Galarraga pitched the greatest game in Tigers’ history last
week and was robbed of a wild celebration that was richly deserved – the
aftermath of a rare perfect game.
Yes, umpire Jim Joyce shockingly called the Cleveland Indian’s 27th batter
safe at first. He seemed to be the only person viewing the game who
thought the runner’s foot beat Galarraga to the bag. Even Joyce admitted
after the game that he mistakenly called the runner safe, ruining
Galarraga’s gem.
And finally, yes, Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig has the authority to
reverse the call and give Galarraga credit for the out, resulting in one
of only 21 perfect games ever pitched in the Major Leagues.
But at what cost? Despite my own initial anger with the ump, with a little
more thought, it becomes obvious that the game’s results SHOULD NOT BE
CHANGED.
If this call is reversed based on video replay, what other calls should be
changed in baseball history? You may be old enough to remember Lou Brock’s
controversial “no-slide out” at home plate that helped turn the World
Series of 1968 in favor of the Tigers. What if video replay showed Brock
was safe? I don’t think today’s outraged Tigers’ fans would be willing to
change that important call, too.
You say you favor the use of instant replay in baseball – but to what
extent? We have the technological capability of eliminating umpires on the
field altogether, relying on cameras to make each call. Center field
cameras would be relied upon to determine balls and strikes. Other video
cameras could do a good job of making calls at the bases, determining if
catches are made, if home runs clear the fences, and whether batted balls
are fair or foul. Robots would throw new baseballs to the pitcher.
You can see the absurdity of relying on technology in the extreme, but
where do you draw the line once it becomes a bigger part of the game?
As much as I hated how Galarraga’s game ended, it would be more disturbing
if Commissioner Selig reverses the umpire’s call. The human touch added by
umpires is an important part of the game and should not be significantly
altered.


 
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