Letters

Letters 04-25-2016

Taking Our Trees Seconds ago this pine tree was alive. Well, Mr. Cook — our County Road Commission head —and Peninsula Township government … by not weighing in (I guess it’s not your problem or responsibility to communicate with residents), you allowed the County Road Commission to bulldoze down huge swaths of lakeside trees in order to increase the bike lane. This can’t be happening. I have no clue why they would cut trees down that help block snow from creating drifts on Peninsula Drive and help keep the beach area intact. Plus, they are not increasing the width of the road when they repave. I just don’t get it. This is amateur hour at county and township government...

Government Service Unrewarded I served the federal government for XX years with the [agency], [doing XX]. I also worked in the private sector, [doing XX]. When I retired, I was surprised to learn my Social Security benefit would be $XXX less per month than my colleagues and neighbors who had never worked for the federal government. This is all because of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) under the Social Security law...

Which Greased Palm Now that “Chicago values” have utterly corrupted the executive and judicial branches of our federal government, this November We the Plebeians shall either vote to right the governing integrity of the United States constitution’s twin pillars of limited government and separation of powers or turn and step collectively onto the blood soaked road to serfdom...

The Political Mess And Challenge As citizens we are faced with a real challenge. The media and the political candidates have taken over a year to attack those whom they are opposing. The unfavorable ratings of those who may be nominated are above 50 percent. That should be no surprise, considering the length of time given to bloodying one another with opinions that have little relationship to truth. The polling companies, which confess they are not reliable, make everything a game of winning...

CORRECTIONS In last week’s issue we had photos with the incorrect stories on page five. The dance photo should have accompanied the story about grants to nonprofits. The image of Crooked Tree Arts Center Petoskey should have accompanied the story about the ArtPrize exhibit at CTAC.

We also reported the incorrect day for the Bayshore Marathon in Traverse City. The correct date is Sat., May 28.

We apologize for these errors.

Home · Articles · News · Sports · Keep Gararaaga‘s...
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Keep Gararaaga‘s ‘perfect‘ game imperfect

George Foster - June 7th, 2010
Keep Galarraga’s ‘perfect game’ imperfect

I hate that X$*#%@ umpire who is obviously blind as a *%$&X# bat. Glad to
get that off my chest.
Yes, Armando Galarraga pitched the greatest game in Tigers’ history last
week and was robbed of a wild celebration that was richly deserved – the
aftermath of a rare perfect game.
Yes, umpire Jim Joyce shockingly called the Cleveland Indian’s 27th batter
safe at first. He seemed to be the only person viewing the game who
thought the runner’s foot beat Galarraga to the bag. Even Joyce admitted
after the game that he mistakenly called the runner safe, ruining
Galarraga’s gem.
And finally, yes, Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig has the authority to
reverse the call and give Galarraga credit for the out, resulting in one
of only 21 perfect games ever pitched in the Major Leagues.
But at what cost? Despite my own initial anger with the ump, with a little
more thought, it becomes obvious that the game’s results SHOULD NOT BE
CHANGED.
If this call is reversed based on video replay, what other calls should be
changed in baseball history? You may be old enough to remember Lou Brock’s
controversial “no-slide out” at home plate that helped turn the World
Series of 1968 in favor of the Tigers. What if video replay showed Brock
was safe? I don’t think today’s outraged Tigers’ fans would be willing to
change that important call, too.
You say you favor the use of instant replay in baseball – but to what
extent? We have the technological capability of eliminating umpires on the
field altogether, relying on cameras to make each call. Center field
cameras would be relied upon to determine balls and strikes. Other video
cameras could do a good job of making calls at the bases, determining if
catches are made, if home runs clear the fences, and whether batted balls
are fair or foul. Robots would throw new baseballs to the pitcher.
You can see the absurdity of relying on technology in the extreme, but
where do you draw the line once it becomes a bigger part of the game?
As much as I hated how Galarraga’s game ended, it would be more disturbing
if Commissioner Selig reverses the umpire’s call. The human touch added by
umpires is an important part of the game and should not be significantly
altered.


 
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