Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Sports · Keep Gararaaga‘s...
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Keep Gararaaga‘s ‘perfect‘ game imperfect

George Foster - June 7th, 2010
Keep Galarraga’s ‘perfect game’ imperfect

I hate that X$*#%@ umpire who is obviously blind as a *%$&X# bat. Glad to
get that off my chest.
Yes, Armando Galarraga pitched the greatest game in Tigers’ history last
week and was robbed of a wild celebration that was richly deserved – the
aftermath of a rare perfect game.
Yes, umpire Jim Joyce shockingly called the Cleveland Indian’s 27th batter
safe at first. He seemed to be the only person viewing the game who
thought the runner’s foot beat Galarraga to the bag. Even Joyce admitted
after the game that he mistakenly called the runner safe, ruining
Galarraga’s gem.
And finally, yes, Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig has the authority to
reverse the call and give Galarraga credit for the out, resulting in one
of only 21 perfect games ever pitched in the Major Leagues.
But at what cost? Despite my own initial anger with the ump, with a little
more thought, it becomes obvious that the game’s results SHOULD NOT BE
CHANGED.
If this call is reversed based on video replay, what other calls should be
changed in baseball history? You may be old enough to remember Lou Brock’s
controversial “no-slide out” at home plate that helped turn the World
Series of 1968 in favor of the Tigers. What if video replay showed Brock
was safe? I don’t think today’s outraged Tigers’ fans would be willing to
change that important call, too.
You say you favor the use of instant replay in baseball – but to what
extent? We have the technological capability of eliminating umpires on the
field altogether, relying on cameras to make each call. Center field
cameras would be relied upon to determine balls and strikes. Other video
cameras could do a good job of making calls at the bases, determining if
catches are made, if home runs clear the fences, and whether batted balls
are fair or foul. Robots would throw new baseballs to the pitcher.
You can see the absurdity of relying on technology in the extreme, but
where do you draw the line once it becomes a bigger part of the game?
As much as I hated how Galarraga’s game ended, it would be more disturbing
if Commissioner Selig reverses the umpire’s call. The human touch added by
umpires is an important part of the game and should not be significantly
altered.


 
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