Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Kelli Snively
. . . .

Kelli Snively

Carina Hume - June 15th, 2009
Kelli Snively: Art That’s Folksy & Fun

By Carina Hume 6/15/09

Humor is a big part of artist Kelli Snively’s life: Spill a glass of red wine on a new bride? Recreate it in a painting called Two Mad Brides. (She stepped on the other one’s dress.) Have a lovable Welsh corgi with big ears? Make him your muse for numerous paintings.
Well-known for her folksy and caricatured pieces over the last 25 years, the Levering resident brings her fun and sass to downtown Petoskey’s Mitchell Street, Thursday-Saturday each week.
With a bubblegum pink doorway leading to her upstairs studio, art-lovers should have no trouble finding their way.

ARTSY FAMILY
Born in Petoskey and raised in Good Hart, this Harbor Springs High School grad first studied photography.
“I’ve been an artist since I started out as a photographer (at 16). My dad built me a darkroom in the basement with no ventilation,” Snively says with a laugh. “I didn’t know what I was doing. But then I went to Western (Michigan University) and I majored in photography; I would just photograph and then paint on it. They weren’t your typical, nice landscapes, but still kind of my style.”
Creativity runs in her family.
“My dad was very creative; he was always making things,” remembers Snively.
Brother Kirby is a well-known musician and furniture maker.
“For years, I didn’t think I could draw, because [Kirby] can draw anything; he’s very talented that way and very talented musically, so I was afraid of it for quite a while. I had to take a painting class in college and I fought it, but once I got there it was like, ‘Oh, I can do this’; it was kind of fun.”

FOLKSY, FUN AND RECYCLED
“I can draw the model, but I’m not interested in that perfect stuff. I like the crazy, the different,” admits Snively. “I like to work with funny stuff; humor is a big thing.” She enjoys painting with oil on wood and creating whimsical pieces with rich color and texture.
Recycled cookie tins found at yard sales and antiques shops are the basis for her newest and most durable works. “I have a lot of tin in my studio up north,” she says. “I cut it up, measure it out, and make pounded and recycled pieces. I love doing it, but I’ll be working on that at home – I can’t do noisy things in here.”
While living in the Virgin Islands, Snively noticed flattened bottle caps, rusted due to the area’s saltwater, discarded on the ground. “I started collecting those; they were like coins. Then, when I went to Europe, I started saving all the cool, different caps, like the cow on the milk jug.” Arranging manipulated bottle caps on wood became one of Snively’s trademarks.
“I’m still doing the bottle caps,” she says. “I used to have the Pub save them and now people bring them and drop them off on the doorstep.”

AN ARTIST’S INSPIRATION
Inspiration for new work comes to Snively in a variety of ways: “You see funny things or just somebody reacts,” she says. “I used to paint from dreams, but I haven’t done that in awhile. I have crazy dreams!”
Years ago, living in New York City and traveling to the Virgin Islands and Europe provided inspiration. She painted agave plants in the Caribbean, and churches and architecture on recycled tin to pay the rent in Spain.
“I have a book that I write titles down in, then once in awhile if I’m stuck I look in there,” Snively says.
A change of scenery in Petoskey’s downtown district is bound to inspire something new.
“I really do like to stay home and paint (in Levering), but I was getting stagnant,” she admits.
Welsh corgi Wilbur, and Snively’s cats even make appearances in some of her works.
“I read a lot of bios on artists – that keeps me going,” says Snively, who’s inspired by surrealist contemporary painter Francesco Clemente. “He was very prolific – one time he had three gallery shows at once in New York. And I like Mark Ryden from California. He makes creepy look good; I love his work.”
Reading and web-surfing helps her stay current. “I keep in touch with what other artists are doing, just so you feel like you’re in the same life.”
A dedicated artist, Snively will always have art in her life. “I think it’s just, needing to,” she says. “If I get away from it for a while I start getting anxious; it’s something I kind of have to do.”

Visit Kelli Snively at her upstairs studio in downtown Petoskey at 436 E. Mitchell St. (just up from Mitchell St. Pub) on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Her work is also available at the Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay, Gallery on Main in Bay Harbor and the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey. For more information go to www.kellisnively.com or e-mail kellisnively@hotmail.com


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close