Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Kelli Snively
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Kelli Snively

Carina Hume - June 15th, 2009
Kelli Snively: Art That’s Folksy & Fun

By Carina Hume 6/15/09

Humor is a big part of artist Kelli Snively’s life: Spill a glass of red wine on a new bride? Recreate it in a painting called Two Mad Brides. (She stepped on the other one’s dress.) Have a lovable Welsh corgi with big ears? Make him your muse for numerous paintings.
Well-known for her folksy and caricatured pieces over the last 25 years, the Levering resident brings her fun and sass to downtown Petoskey’s Mitchell Street, Thursday-Saturday each week.
With a bubblegum pink doorway leading to her upstairs studio, art-lovers should have no trouble finding their way.

ARTSY FAMILY
Born in Petoskey and raised in Good Hart, this Harbor Springs High School grad first studied photography.
“I’ve been an artist since I started out as a photographer (at 16). My dad built me a darkroom in the basement with no ventilation,” Snively says with a laugh. “I didn’t know what I was doing. But then I went to Western (Michigan University) and I majored in photography; I would just photograph and then paint on it. They weren’t your typical, nice landscapes, but still kind of my style.”
Creativity runs in her family.
“My dad was very creative; he was always making things,” remembers Snively.
Brother Kirby is a well-known musician and furniture maker.
“For years, I didn’t think I could draw, because [Kirby] can draw anything; he’s very talented that way and very talented musically, so I was afraid of it for quite a while. I had to take a painting class in college and I fought it, but once I got there it was like, ‘Oh, I can do this’; it was kind of fun.”

FOLKSY, FUN AND RECYCLED
“I can draw the model, but I’m not interested in that perfect stuff. I like the crazy, the different,” admits Snively. “I like to work with funny stuff; humor is a big thing.” She enjoys painting with oil on wood and creating whimsical pieces with rich color and texture.
Recycled cookie tins found at yard sales and antiques shops are the basis for her newest and most durable works. “I have a lot of tin in my studio up north,” she says. “I cut it up, measure it out, and make pounded and recycled pieces. I love doing it, but I’ll be working on that at home – I can’t do noisy things in here.”
While living in the Virgin Islands, Snively noticed flattened bottle caps, rusted due to the area’s saltwater, discarded on the ground. “I started collecting those; they were like coins. Then, when I went to Europe, I started saving all the cool, different caps, like the cow on the milk jug.” Arranging manipulated bottle caps on wood became one of Snively’s trademarks.
“I’m still doing the bottle caps,” she says. “I used to have the Pub save them and now people bring them and drop them off on the doorstep.”

AN ARTIST’S INSPIRATION
Inspiration for new work comes to Snively in a variety of ways: “You see funny things or just somebody reacts,” she says. “I used to paint from dreams, but I haven’t done that in awhile. I have crazy dreams!”
Years ago, living in New York City and traveling to the Virgin Islands and Europe provided inspiration. She painted agave plants in the Caribbean, and churches and architecture on recycled tin to pay the rent in Spain.
“I have a book that I write titles down in, then once in awhile if I’m stuck I look in there,” Snively says.
A change of scenery in Petoskey’s downtown district is bound to inspire something new.
“I really do like to stay home and paint (in Levering), but I was getting stagnant,” she admits.
Welsh corgi Wilbur, and Snively’s cats even make appearances in some of her works.
“I read a lot of bios on artists – that keeps me going,” says Snively, who’s inspired by surrealist contemporary painter Francesco Clemente. “He was very prolific – one time he had three gallery shows at once in New York. And I like Mark Ryden from California. He makes creepy look good; I love his work.”
Reading and web-surfing helps her stay current. “I keep in touch with what other artists are doing, just so you feel like you’re in the same life.”
A dedicated artist, Snively will always have art in her life. “I think it’s just, needing to,” she says. “If I get away from it for a while I start getting anxious; it’s something I kind of have to do.”

Visit Kelli Snively at her upstairs studio in downtown Petoskey at 436 E. Mitchell St. (just up from Mitchell St. Pub) on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Her work is also available at the Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay, Gallery on Main in Bay Harbor and the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey. For more information go to www.kellisnively.com or e-mail kellisnively@hotmail.com


 
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