Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Japanese Woodblocks: Mary Brodbeck
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Japanese Woodblocks: Mary Brodbeck

Kristi Kates - June 29th, 2009
Japanese Woodblock
Mary Brodbeck teaches the printmaking art of Japan
By Kristi Kates 6/29/09

Mary Brodbeck grew up on a dairy farm in southern Michigan, and felt “a magnetic pull” to the ground her family farmed. As a young adult, she wanted to expand her world away from that country life - studying industrial design at Michigan State University and subsequently moving to Los Angeles to work at an architectural firm. But the way she felt about the land and waters of Michigan remained unchanged, and she decided to return.
“After a few months in L.A., I realized that I would have to make a radical change in myself in order to survive there. In essence, I would have to leave the country girl behind. I decided to move back to Michigan - in part because I had never been to Traverse City - I’m not making this up! - and partly because I liked who I was and didn’t want to give up being that country girl.”

REVISING LIFE
Soon after Brodbeck arrived back in Michigan, she began designing office furniture for a manufacturing company in Holland. But it wasn’t long before she felt it was time for yet another life change.
“After a few years in the corporate environment, I longed for a work life that was more meaningful, and Michigan’s Great Lake landscapes had a great pull on me,” Brodbeck explains. “So, in 1990, I quit my job to ‘draw Michigan.’ I drove around the entire shoreline making sketches and taking photographs. It was about that time too, when I made my first woodblock print in a class in Saugatuck at OxBow, a school of art and artists’ residencies which has an affiliation with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.”
Brodbeck’s journey towards her art would meander for awhile; she returned to school - this time to Western Michigan University for a Masters of Fine Arts degree in printmaking - and began making plans for printmaking to replace her furniture design career.
“I was drawn to the Japanese woodblock printmaking process because of its simplicity, particularly when setting up shop,” she says. “Japanese woodblock prints are made much the same way today as they were 400 years ago. There are the carving tools, wood, ink (water color paint) rice paste, a few brushes, paper and a hand-held baren (the burnishing tool). Other attractions for me to this process include its non-toxicity, working in color, working with wood, and woodblock printmaking’s inherent reliance on design. The Japanese process is different from Western methods in that is is more heavily based on color and design, rather than mark-making; the Japanese process seemed to suit my interests, experience and temperament, best.”

JAPANESE OPPORTUNITY
While in the graduate program at WMU, Brodbeck sought to study the printmaking process in Japan. She soon got connected to Yoshisuke Funasaka, a teacher in Tokyo, who applied for the prestigious Bunka Cho Fellowship on Brodbeck’s behalf - and she got it. The Bunka Cho Fellowship, funded by the Japanese government, sponsors artists from abroad to travel to Japan to learn a traditional Japanese art, in part to foster knowledge and understanding between cultures, as well as to help keep Japanese arts alive throughout the world.
“It was a fantastic honor to receive the award, and I tried to take full advantage of it,” Brodbeck says. “While in Japan, I spent a lot of time working in my apartment. I enjoyed living in Tokyo very much, and enjoyed Japanese food and culture. Artistically, I was inspired by the Japanese woodblock landscapes series of Hokusai and Hiroshige and always knew that I was going to focus on the landscape too, specifically of Michigan and the Great Lakes.”
Recently, she completed a series of 10 prints of Sleeping Bear Dunes, from a residency she had on the lakeshore in 2006. The prints are on display at the Crooked Tree Art Council’s Art Tree Sales Gallery in Petoskey.

PETOSKEY WORKSHOP
Brodbeck’s Great Lakes prints are highly collectible, and are acclaimed for their “superior craftsmanship and striking design,” as one review says. Brodbeck has chosen to share what she’s learned by teaching Japanese woodblock printmaking in workshops around the country, as well as at her studio in Kalamazoo.
Petoskey will host Brodbeck’s talents at a workshop this July.
No experience is necessary for the workshop, although there is a maximum number of students allowed, so those interested are encouraged to sign up soon.
Brodbeck will take students step-by-step through creating a color woodblock print in the traditional relief printing method, in which the non-image area is carved away from the surface, and the remaining raised surfaces are painted; paper is then placed upon the carved and painted block and pressed so that the desired image transfers to the paper. This is the oldest form of printmaking; the relief method accompanied the invention of paper around 600 A.D.
“Students in the five day workshop will learn the woodblock printmaking basics of design and layout, carving, printing and color registration,” Brodbeck explains. “Each participant will complete at least one print design; I am hoping that everyone will also be willing to exchange with one another.”
“I started teaching this process soon after I came back from Japan,” she says, “I felt it was important to honor the fellowship’s mission.”

More info about Mary Brodbeck and her work may be found at www.marybrodbeck.com; further information on her Petoskey workshop, July 6-10, may be found at www.crookedtree.org, or by signing up at the Crooked Tree Arts Center at 231-347-4337.

 
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