Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · An American Century visits Petoskey
. . . .

An American Century visits Petoskey

Kristi Kates - July 20th, 2009
An American Century
Visits Petoskey

By Kristi Kates 7/20/09

“As far as how long it will take to tour the collection, I have had people
return over and over again - because they say they cannot take it all in
at one time,” says exhibit curator Gail DeMeyere.
DeMeyere - who is also CTAC’s visual arts/education director - is
referring to the newest exhibit recently opened at Petoskey’s Crooked Tree
Arts Center: the prestigious An American Century: Paintings from the
Manoogian Collection.
It is somewhat unprecedented to have a collection of this magnitude in a
smaller town, even one as arts-focused as Petoskey; but luckily for
Northern Michigan residents and art appreciators, Richard Manoogian
himself has several friends that live in the area, “and his love of art is
something that he is passionate about sharing with others,” DeMeyere
explains.

GREAT COLLECTORS
Manoogian began actively collecting American art in the mid-1970s; today,
he and his wife Jane are still collectors of great American art, and their
current collection is known to be remarkable for its quality and scope.
While the collection primarily focuses on the 19th century, it also
includes superb examples of American art from the late 18th and early 20th
centuries; the collection reflects Manoogian’s belief that “it is
important for people to appreciate the unique character, diversity, and
quality of American art.”
DeMeyere also notes that through Manoogian’s generosity, the funding of An
American Century was provided in full.
“Without this type of support on a grand scale, this exhibition simply
would not be possible given the current conditions that the arts are
experiencing today,” DeMeyere continues, “I do need to say, too, that the
primary force in getting the Manoogian Collection to Petoskey and the
Crooked Tree Arts Center this summer is Richard’s long time friendship
with local resident Ruth Petzold, whose work is also on display at CTAC;
her photography work is a pure joy, and reflects her respect for our
natural world both above and below the water.”

HISTORICAL WORKS
An American Century represents 33 works from a much larger collection
owned by the Manoogians. The works in An American Century include
representations from the Hudson River School of painting, which is
considered the first true American school of landscape painting; Jasper
Francis Cropsey is one of the first-generation Hudson River School
artists, represented in this collection with a work entitled Spring in
England
c. 1860.
The earliest work in the exhibition is a series entitled The Voyage of
Life, of which each painting spans over seven feet in length; the four
collected works take up an entire wall in the Crooked Tree Arts Center
gallery, and were considered the magnum opus of their painter, Thomas
Cole, although the series was actually completed by DeWitt Clinton
Boutelle when Cole succumbed to pneumonia in 1848.
From the mid 1800s, the Manoogian Collection moves through works of the
late 1800s and early 1900s, including works by artists James McDougall
Hart, David Johnson, George Cope, William Merritt Chase, John George
Brown, and the legendary John Singer Sargent.

EMOTIONAL CHORD
“This exhibition seems to strike an emotional chord with all who enter,”
DeMeyere enthuses, “as I walk the galleries it is interesting to me how
different pieces resonate with each new viewer. From one standpoint, there
is the sheer beauty of the American impressionist works of Frederick
Frieseke’s The Garden Pool, or William Merritt Chase’s Portrait of
Caroline Allport; and from the other side, there is the crowd favorite of
Cassius Coolidge’s The Poker Game.
“I also do not want to leave out the emotional impact of the Hudson River
School works, or John Singer Sargent’s Portrait of S. Weir Mitchell, she
continues, “I was just asked what piece in the collection was my favorite,
and I had to honestly say all of them. It seems that every time I enter
the galleries I fall in love with a new work. I have spent a great deal of
time looking at each painting, and I am struck with awe and respect for
the sensitivity, beauty and placement in history that these works
reflect.”

“An American Century: Paintings from the Manoogian Collection” and
“Sea/Safari/Chill: the Photography of Ruth Petzold” will be on display at
the Crooked Tree Arts Center through August 8, 2009. The galleries are
open Monday through Friday from 9-5, Saturday from 10-4, and Sunday from
12-4. There is a $10 recommended donation for the Manoogian exhibition. 


 
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