Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · A job in film?
. . . .

A job in film?

Kelsey Lauer - July 27th, 2009
A Job in Film?
As one industry dwindles,another one grows

By Kelsey Lauer 7/27/09

Michigan is no stranger to the art of filmmaking.
“Back in the heyday of the car industry in the ‘50s, Detroit actually
consumed more 35-millimeter film stock than Hollywood,” says Traverse City
film producer Richard Brauer. “But it was all corporate stuff. They
actually shot more film than Hollywood did. It’s an amazing statistic.”
Some of Brauer’s past productions include Mr. Art Critic, Escanaba in da
Moonlight, Barn Red and Frozen Stupid. He’s also been active through the
years filming commercials and promotional projects.
While Michigan may not replace Hollywood in the production of feature
films, Brauer thinks that the Michigan film industry has more than a
fighting chance. He credited it in part to the 2008 legislation that
provides a 40 percent refund to productions that spend at least $50,000
in-state.
“We all know it’s a beautiful place, but it’s a hard place to get to if
your home base is in Los Angeles,” Brauer says of Michigan. “But if you’re
going to get 40 percent back from the state for being here, all of a
sudden the logistical challenges fade away a little bit.”
Films made in Michigan may also offer job opportunities for individuals
displaced by the dwindling car industry, according to Brauer.
“There was a lot of production support relating to the car industry --
tons of it in Detroit -- and they’re all sitting around with their fingers
in their ears, so as features roll in, they’re more available now to work
on features,” he says. “A lot of it’s the same stuff. They’re not the
ones directing it or writing it; they’re the ones helping with electricity
or lighting and building sets and all that. And so they’ve been doing that
for the car industry forever.”

UP TO SNUFF
Brauer says that it will take time for Hollywood to realize the potential
of Michigan-based production support. Crew members have to demonstrate
that they are up to snuff, too.
“We have to prove ourselves. Let’s face it—Hollywood is really good at
making movies, and for them to be convinced to hire a local guy or gal, it
may not be worth it to them, risk-wise,” he says. “They’d much rather
bring their own people in, but once this thing gets rolling—it might take
five years before it really works—they might take a chance on somebody and
think, ‘That guy was perfect. He was really a thoughtful guy. Next time
we’re here, we’ll use him.’”
And one way to accomplish that is through training workshops or film
mentoring classes. So far, Brauer has taught at West Shore Community
College in conjunction with 10 West Studios in Manistee; and at a film
workshop In Lansing organized by Michigan State University, Lansing
Community College and Michigan Public Works.
“In the Lansing one, there were over 1,000 people that applied for this
class,” Brauer says. “But we had to limit it to 60, so Michigan Works
made up criteria, and you had to write essays and get into the program. By
the time I got down there, I was already at the top six percent of the
applicants. These are motivated people.”
Northwestern Michigan College also will hold its first film workshop
scheduled from Aug. 4-7, taught mostly by Brauer. “I’m going to bring in
three or four other people in the filming community to talk about their
specific area, including the film production assistant,” he says. “That’s
probably the best and easiest area for anybody to get into the film
business, to just become a production assistant. Then you can hang around
and sort of get the deal and then you gradually move up from there.”
Brauer plans to hire two students from each of the three classes to work
on his next film as paid interns.
“The job-industry connection is one we’re trying to make. I’ve always
tried to have mentoring opportunities with all our films. We’ve always
done this, it’s just that this is the first time I’ve actually grabbed
them out of a class. People just kind of bump into me or they make
themselves known. We sort of train them in the field.”

A Fitful film project

Brauer will begin shooting his next film, Fitful, this September in
Manistee and Milwaukee.
“This woman works for the National Historic Trust, and her office calls
her ands says, ‘Hey, on your way home, swing in and check out this ship.’
She does, her car gets wrecked and she has to spend the night because
she’s too far away for any help and her cell phone fell in the water,”
Brauer says. “There are no neighbors within 15 miles and it’s getting
dark, so she’s stuck on this boat. This thing is a very scary film but
it’s very funny, I think, so it’s got two real strong emotions going on
the whole time through. It’s kind of fun.”
Brauer plans to be done by Christmas and hopes that he will be able to
premiere the film at the Traverse City State Theatre.
“Money’s in the bank, we’re going. It’ll be done by Christmas,” he says.
“Hopefully, by Christmas, we’ll have a big old gala premiere, right
downtown there, and people can come and have some fun and get scared and
laugh, all at the same time.”












 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close